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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 104 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 77 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 70 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 53 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 39 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 37 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 31 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 29 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 25 1 Browse Search
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 25 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for John Pegram or search for John Pegram in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 4 document sections:

y. I have taken all his guns, a very large amount of wagons, tents, &c.--everything he had — a large number of prisoners, many of whom were wounded, and several officers prisoners. They lost many killed. We have lost, in all, perhaps twenty killed and fifty wounded, of whom all but two or three were in the column under Rosecrans, which turned the position. The mass of the enemy escaped through the woods, entirely disorganized. Among the prisoners is Dr. Taylor, formerly of the army. Col. Pegram was in command. Colonel Rosecrans's column left camp yesterday morning, and marched some eight miles through the mountains, reaching the turnpike some two or three miles in rear of the enemy, defeating an advanced post, and taking a couple of guns. I had a position ready for twelve guns near the main camp, and as guns were moving up, I ascertained that the enemy had retreated. I am now pushing on to Beverly, a part of Colonel Rosecrans's troops being now within three miles of it.
Doc. 87.-Colonel Pegram's surrender. July 12, 1861. Gen. McClellan's report to Lieut.-Gen. Scott. Headquarters, Beverly, Va., July 13, 1861. Col. E. D. Townsend, Washington, D. C.:-- I have received from Col. Pegram propositions for the surrender, with his officers and remnant of his command — say six hundred men. They are said to be extremely penitent, and determined never again toal Government. I shall have near nine hundred or one thousand prisoners to take care of when Col. Pegram comes in. The latest accounts make the loss of the rebels in killed some one hundred and fiftinvariably shown to the northern prisoners by the South. I am, sir, your obedient servant, John Pegram, Lieutenant-Colonel P. A. C. S., Com'dg. General McClellan sent the following reply by hi United States Army: Headquarters, Department of the Ohio, Beverly, Va., July 13, 1861. John Pegram, Esq., styling himself Lieutenant-Colonel, P. A. C. S.: sir: Your communication dated yest
e general command of Gen. Garnett, of Virginia, though he remained at Laurel Hill, appointing Col. Pegram to command at Rich Mountain. Beverly, at the junction of the two roads, was not fortified. a white flag was seen flying over the rebel fort, and it was soon afterwards found deserted. Col. Pegram left as secretly as possible, taking to the woods. He abandoned every thing — tents, horses,as considerable, but has since been greatly increased. There will probably be a thousand, as Col. Pegram, with six hundred men, after wandering in the hills for thirty-six hours, and being completelg to surrender as prisoners of war. The General required an unconditional surrender, to which Col. Pegram submitted. He was brought into our camp at Beverly yesterday. His force is chiefly from Easan was in the jail, but she was liberated. She reports that another woman was carried away. Col. Pegram's army had been very boastful, and fully believed that the Yankees wouldn't fight. It is sai
up our line of march for Beverly, a distance of sixteen miles, which place we came within three miles of, when we found that a very formidable blockade had been erected, which we could not pass, and, therefore, had to march back on the route we had previously come, to a road that led to the northeast, towards St. George, in Tucker County, which we entered early in the morning. (Here I would state, in the way of parenthesis, that it was the object of General G. to form a connection with Colonels Pegram and Heck, who were stationed at Rich Mountain, and move on Cheat Mountain, via Huttonsville; but the enemy, it seems, cut us off, and got between the two commands, and had our small force almost completely surrounded.) Thus, you will see, our command, composed of four companies of cavalry, Captain Shoemaker's Danville Artillery, Colonel William B. Taliaferro's Twenty-third regiment, Colonel Jackson's regiment, Colonel Fulkerson's Thirty-seventh regiment, and the Georgia regiment, Col. R