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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Chapter 1: old Cambridge (search)
whose first wife was a Channing, and whose second wife a Dana. Rev. Charles Lowell came to live in Cambridge in 1819, and he and his children, the Rev. R. T. S. Lowell, James Russell Lowell, and Mrs. S. R. Putnam, were all authors. Judge Joseph Story, the most eminent legal writer whom America has produced, resided for many years in Cambridge (1829-1845), as did his son, William Wetmore Story, author and sculptor, and his son-in-law, George Ticknor Curtis, legal writer and historian. Benjamin Peirce, who was college librarian (1826-1831), was father of the celebrated mathematician of that name; and his two grandchildren, James Mills Peirce and Charles Sanders Peirce, have followed with distinction in the same path. The Rev. John G. Palfrey, the historian of New England, bequeathed similar tastes to his children, both of his sons having contributed to military history, while his oldest daughter has written both poetry and fiction under the name of E. Foxton. Professor Charles Elio
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Chapter 4: Longfellow (search)
time, the best model of manners among all the professors, but it was sometimes felt that his courtesy had a little background of reserve, not easily surmounted. Young people demand not merely kindliness from their elders, but perhaps a little exuberance, and are sometimes as much checked by the absence of this secondary supply of cordiality as by coldness of first greeting. Professor Longfellow never was cold, but on the other hand he was never quite warm; and I sometimes thought that Professor Peirce, the mathematician, who rarely answered our greetings in the street, yet was all frankness if he happened to speak to us, was more thoroughly winning to juveniles than the uniformly courteous but more distant Longfellow. The point where this underlying stratum of coolness came in superbly was in his feeling toward critics, who were absolutely powerless to hurt him. He rarely read their attacks, though he had a habit of preserving them; and the really outrageous assaults of Poe, for in
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Index (search)
as, 150, 151, 152. Page, W. H., 69. Palfrey, Rev. J. G., 16, 44, 50. Palfrey, Miss Sarah H., 16. Parker, Rev., Theodore, 53, 58, 62, 63, 67, 104, 179, 180, 181. Parsons, Charles, 77. Parsons, T. W., 67. Paul, Jean, (see Richter). Peirce, Benjamin, 16. Peirce, Prof., Benjamin, 143. Peirce, C. S., 16. Peirce, J. M., 16. Percival, J. G., 175, 191. Perry, T. S., 70. Petrarch, Francis, 191. Phelps, E. J., 195. Phillips, M. D., 68. Phillips, Wendell, 104, 179. Phillips, Willard, Peirce, Prof., Benjamin, 143. Peirce, C. S., 16. Peirce, J. M., 16. Percival, J. G., 175, 191. Perry, T. S., 70. Petrarch, Francis, 191. Phelps, E. J., 195. Phillips, M. D., 68. Phillips, Wendell, 104, 179. Phillips, Willard, 44. Pierce, Pres., Franklin, 113. Poe, E. A., 137, 144, 173. Pope, Alexander, 90, 91. Popkin, Dr. J. S., 23. Potter, Barrett, 119. Pratt, Dexter, 126. Pratt, Rowena, 126. Putnam, Rev., George, 54, Putnam, Mrs. S. R., 16. Puttenham, George, 159. Quincy, Edmund, 67, 104. Quincy, Pres., Josiah, 29, 43, 157. Read, Gen., Meredith, 132. Richter, J. P. F., 85, 116. Riedesel, Baroness, 149, 150. Ripley, George, 48, 54,57, 67, 113. Rossetti, D. G., 132. Rousseau, J. J., 191. Ruggle