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Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 16 2 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 16 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 6 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson. You can also browse the collection for Pelham or search for Pelham in all documents.

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Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 14: the Richmond campaign. (search)
ing cheers, rising from every side out of the smoking woods, told that his will was anticipated, and the day was won. At this sound, no elation lighted up his features, but subduing the tempest of his passion, he rode calmly forward to direct the pursuit of the enemy. In this battle, General Jackson employed little artillery. Upon his wing a few of the batteries of D. H. Hill were put in action at the extreme left, with small effect at first, upon the enemy's fire. Later in the day, Major Pelham, of Stuart's horseartillery, whose splendid courage Jackson then first witnessed took position in front of Cold Harbor, with two guns, and engaged the Federal batteries which obstructed the movements of Hill. One of his pieces was speedily disabled; but with the other, he continued the unequal duel to the close of the day. At sunset, the batteries upon the extreme left were reinforced by those of Courtenay and Brockenborough. Thirty guns now opened upon the retreating enemy, and contrib
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 16: second Manassa's. (search)
lel to the Warrenton turnpike, and distant from it, between one and two miles. The division of A. P. Hill formed his left, that of Ewell his centre, and that of Taliaferro, strengthened by the remainder of the cavalry and the horse artillery of Pelham, his right. Scarcely had these dispositions been completed, when the enemy was found to be advancing along the Warrenton turnpike in heavy masses, as though to force his way back to Alexandria. Mid-day had now arrived. The second brigade ofely wounded were two brigade commanders, Field and Forno. During the heat of the battle, a detachment of Federal troops had penetrated to Jackson's rear, near Sudley Church, and captured a few wounded men and ambulances. The horse artillery of Pelham, with a battalion of cavalry, under Major Patrick, speedily brushed the annoyance away, and recovered the captures. But this incident cost the army the loss of one of its most enlightened and efficient officers, the chivalrous Patrick, who was m
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 18: Fredericksburg. (search)
st, and retired with loss down the river, running the gantlet of the guns of Major Pelham's horse artillery, which lined the bank. A few days after, they returned toth two brigades of cavalry, and his famous horse artillery, under the boy hero, Pelham, thrown forward toward the enemy's left flank in the plain. In front of Archeranced with them upon the plain. But as they passed the line of the river road, Pelham dashed forward into the open fields with two chosen guns of his horse-artilleryof infantry into crotchet at right angles to their main line, so as to confront Pelham, and directed upon him the whole fire of four batteries, besides the distant hey accuracy, and still pouring a rapid fire into the infantry. It was not until Pelham was recalled by positive orders, that he would surrender his hazardous positionened furiously upon the Federal infantry, firing to their front and left, while Pelham, supported by the twelve guns of Jackson in front of his extreme right, again s