hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 16 2 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 16 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 6 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Pelham or search for Pelham in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fitzhugh Lee. From the Times-dispatch, January 5, 1908. (search)
delicate operations of the campaign. One of the hardest fought cavalry battles of the war, in proportion to the numbers engaged, was that between General Averill's Division of nearly 3,000 men, and Fitz Lee's Brigade of not more than 800 (many having been sent home to recruit their horses) at Kelly Ford on the 17th of March, 1863. The Confederates were victorious, and Averill recrossed the Rappahannock. Breathed's horse artillery covered itself with glory. It was here that the gallant Pelham, as General Lee spoke of him, in his report of Fredericksburg, was killed, a loss deeply deplored by the whole army. I refer again to Chancellorsville only to say that I do not think the value of Fitz Lee's service in screening and protecting Jackson's great flank movement, and by his quick and close reconnoisance, ascertaining and pointing out to Jackson where his lines could be formed to strike the enemy's rear and flank at the greatest advantage, is generally appreciated. With Stuart