hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 16 2 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 16 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 6 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Pelham or search for Pelham in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 1 document section:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—the war on the Rapidan. (search)
om Kelly's Ford when they found themselves facing Lee's brigade, which had arrived in haste, followed by a battery of artillery commanded by the young and valiant Pelham. Averell's dismounted men occupied the edge of a wood, strongly intrenched behind a stone wall; beyond this wood lay a quantity of fallow lands which separated tge in order to check their progress, and covering every group of men within their reach with shells. One of these projectiles inflicted a mortal wound upon young Pelham, who, at the age of twenty-one, had already gained the esteem and admiration of his chiefs. The Confederates, thus repulsed, got as far as Brandy Station, abourigade, and driven back upon their line of skirmishers. But the latter presented such a bold front, and the Southern artillerists, anxious to avenge the death of Pelham, served their pieces with so much zeal and precision, that the Unionists thought they had to cope with a brigade of infantry which had come to the assistance of S