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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz). You can also browse the collection for Duncan Archibald Pell or search for Duncan Archibald Pell in all documents.

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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
isplain myself. You see, fus' I was subjoined to Ginral Burnside; an' den I was disseminated to Ginral Pharo. We wus advancing up towards der front, an' I, as it might be, loitered a little. Presently I see some of our boys a-runnina back. Ho, ho, sez I, run is your word, is it? So I jes separates myself from my gun and I re-tires to dis spot. Well, there was Ginral Pharo taking a drink, and an appearance was about as of packing. Whereat I presently discovered, through the joyous Captain Pell (who asked me tauntingly if he could do anything for me at Newport ), that Burnside and his Staff were all going on a thirty-day leave, which will extend itself, I fancy, indefinitely, so far as this army goes. On my return I found two fat civilians and a lean one. Fat number one was Mr. Otto, Assistant Secretary of the Interior; Fat number two, a Professor Matile, a Swiss of Neufchatel, and friend of Agassiz (you perhaps remember the delicious wine of that place). The lean was Mr. Fall
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 9 (search)
epeated itself on Grant's face, as he put down the bonbonniere beside the scroll. Then he looked very fixedly at Mr. Washburn and slowly drew a sheet of paper from his pocket. Everyone was hushed, and there then burst forth the following florid eloquence: Sir! I accept the medal. I shall take an early opportunity of writing a proper reply to the President. I shall publish an order, containing these resolutions, to the troops that were under my command before Vicksburg. As he stopped, Major Pell drew a long breath and said: I thought we were sure of a speech this time, but now we never shall get one out of him. The medal was of gold, three pounds in weight; on one side a bad likeness of Grant; on the reverse a goddess, in an impossible position, who, as General Meade remarked, seemed to keep a general furnishing shop of guns and sabres. What is the meaning of the allegory? he enquired of the Lieutenant-General. I don't know, replied Grant, with entire simplicity, I don't know,
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
good, 121, 266; bearing of Rebel, 152. Ord, Edward Otho Cresap, 200, 233, 266, 320, 335, 357. Ordinary, in Virginia, 119. Otto, William Tod, 212. Ovens, Dutch, 351. Palfrey, Francis Winthrop, 65. Parke, John Grubb, 233, 234, 236, 323, 334; described, 213; engineer, 246. Parker, Isaac Brown, 288. Parker, Theodore, 260. Patrick, Marsena Rudolph, 74. Patten, Henry Lyman, 208. Pease, Charles Elliott, 358. Peeble house, 235, 254, 321. Peel, Cecil Lennox, captain, 49. Pell, Duncan Archibald, 212, 312, 319. Pemberton, John Clifford, 102. Perkins house, 328. Perkinson, —, 347. Petersburg, manoeuvres about, 160; mine, 195, 310, 341; taken, 333, 339. Phillips, Charles Appleton, 169. Picket line, described, 301. Piney Branch church, 104. Platt, Edward Russell, 123. Pleasonton, Alfred, 75, 79, 80; Lyman with, 14; for command, 60. Pleasants, Henry, 195, 198. Plunder, demoralizing effect, 40; Hancock and, 288. Point of Rocks, Appomattox River, 193. Pontoon