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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 26 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 18 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 3 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lathrop, or Lothrop, John 1740-1816 (search)
Lathrop, or Lothrop, John 1740-1816 Clergyman; born in Norwich, Conn., May 17, 1740; graduated at Princeton College in 1763; became pastor of the Old North Church in Boston, in 1768. At the beginning of the Revolutionary War his church was demolished by the British. He then became the assistant of Dr. Ebenezer Pemberton in the New Brick Church of Boston, and when the latter died, in 1779, he was chosen pastor of the united congregations. He was the author of a Biographical memoir of the Rev. John Lothrop; and Compendious history of the late War. He died in Boston, Mass., Jan. 4, 1816.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Logan, John Alexander 1826-1886 (search)
ers the march that McPherson's troops made in the night from Jackson to Baker's Creek. Does he not remember that while Pemberton, with nearly his whole army, was attacking Hovey's division, my division was moved in on the right of Hovey, and Crocker supporting Hovey, these three divisions receiving nearly the whole force of Pemberton's 30,000 men? Does he not remember of one small brigade sent by me (with his assent) down through a strip of wood, a distance of a mile or a mile and a half away from the balance of the force, getting in on the left flank of Pemberton's army? Does he not remember that that one little brigade of not more than 2,000 men attacked the left flank of Pemberton's army, and that the latter became so panic-strickePemberton's army, and that the latter became so panic-stricken that the whole army fled, and we captured all the artillery and drove them that night across Black River? If a brigade of 2,000 men could do all this by striking the flank of the enemy, what does General Grant think Porter with his corps could ha
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 2: Parentage and Family.—the father. (search)
my, Andover, Mass., at that time under the charge of Ebenezer Pemberton, and was placed in the family of Rev. Jonathan French, the minister of the South Parish of that town. Mr. Pemberton was a graduate of Princeton College. James Madison and Aand Quincy, in his Life of Josiah Quincy, p. 28, says of Mr. Pemberton: This gentleman lived till 1836, and was past ninety whpresidents-Kirkland and Quincy to Harvard. A sketch of Mr. Pemberton, written by Charles Pinckney Sumner, is printed in the family, while pursuing his studies at the academy under Mr. Pemberton and his predecessor, Dr. Eliphalet Pearson, afterwards Memorial of Abigail Stearns. Boston, 1859. To both Mr. Pemberton and Rev. Mr. French Major Sumner wrote with earnestnessOn Oct. 9, 1788, Ma or Sumner, then in Boston, wrote to Mr. Pemberton,— I like the appearance and improvement of Master in the Billerica Academy, of which his former teacher, Mr. Pemberton, had become the principal. While here he received a pl
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 15: the Circuits.—Visits in England and Scotland.—August to October, 1838.—age, 27. (search)
each supposing the other referred to by Denman! After dinner the conversation turned upon politics, and upon Canadian affairs in particular. His Lordship seemed to exult over Lord Durham, and to think that he had him on the hip. He praised Roebuck as a person of great talent; and spoke of Erskine as a very great man. When I asked who at the bar now was most like him, he said: Nobody: there is a degenerate race now; there are no good speakers at the bar, except Sir William Follett and Mr. Pemberton. He spoke of Lord Langdale as a person who had never done any thing, and who never would do any thing, and who was an ordinary man. He said that Mr. and Mrs. Austin, John Austin, 1797-1860; author of The Province of Jurisprudence Determined; and Mrs. Sarah Austin of the Taylor family of Norwich, the translator of Ranke's History of the Popes, and other German works. Mrs. Austin died in 1867. Their daughter, Lady Duff Gordon, well-known in literature, died in Egypt, in 1869.—who had
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
Thomas Shepard, See Book I, Chap. IX. in some respects the best poem produced in the colonies before the eighteenth century, dates from 1677. As early as 1693, at least, book dealers had begun to sell private libraries, for in that year appeared The Library of the late Reverend and learned Mr. Samuel Lee . . . Exposed . . . to sale, by Duncan Campbell, Boston. At Boston also was issued in 1717 A catalogue of curious and valuable books, belonging to the late Reverend & learned Mr. Ebenezer Pemberton . . . to be sold by auction, at the Brown Coffee-House in Boston, the second day of July, 1717, which is held to be our first auction sale catalogue of books. With these dates, involving as they do scholarly activity, press work of some note, printer and publisher, adumbrations at least of literary genius, and the circulation of books through carefully formulated advertisement, the history of American publishers and publication may truly be said to be under headway. In these earl
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
442 Patterson, Medill, 294 Paul, 469 Paul Kauvar, 277 Paul Patoff, 88 Payne, J. H., 498 Peabody, Andrew Preston, 302, 472 Peabody, F. G., 423 Peabody, Josephine Preston, 290 Peabody, O. W. B., 481 Pearl Bryn, 512 Pearl of great price, the, 519 Pearl of Orr's Island, the, 72 Peary, Josephine D., 170 Peary, R. E., 169 Peffer, Senator, 357 Peg oa My heart, 295 Peirce, Benjamin, 233, 242, 462 Peirce, C. S., 236, 239, 241-44, 246, 247, 251 257, 265 Pemberton, Ebenezer, 534 Pendennis, 294 Penicault, 591 Penn, Wm., 387, 445 Pennsylvania Archives, the, 175 Pennsylvania farmer, the, 432 Pennsylvania Gazette, 576 Pennsylvania (University), 392, 393, 394, 434, 577 Penrod, 288, 420 Pension Beaurepas, the, 99 Pepys, 513 Percival, R. D., 549 Perennes, P., 592 Perplexed philosopher, a, 441 Perriam, Jonathan, 356 Perrin, Bernadotte, 468 Perry, A. L., 435 Perry, B. F., 342 Perry, Bliss, 36, 307 Perry, Commodore,
it was said that it was large, high, curiously hung with green; our dining place was also accommodated with the pleasancy of a murmuring rivulet. This day, some of our company saw a bear; but being near a thick swamp, he escaped our pursuit. Towards night we heard (I think) three guns; but we knew not who shot them. Our whole company come this day to Quaboag, about sundown, not long before nor after. Coll. Mass. Hist. Soc., XXXI. 102. The easterly section of this road is mentioned by Pemberton, under date of Sept. 30, 1783, in his manuscript Chronology, preserved in the library of the Mass. Hist. Society: A gentleman of this State remarks, that soon after the settlement of our Fathers at Boston, the persons appointed to explore the country, and lay out public roads did it as far as the bank by Mrs. Biglow in Weston, and reported that they had done it as far as they believed would ever be necessary, it being about seven miles from the College in Cambridge. It is proper to add
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Chapter 15: ecclesiastical History. (search)
hich he principally delighted. Like his great Lord and Master, he went (or sent) about doing good. His principles were sober, sound, moderate, being of a catholic and pacific spirit. In a preface to Dr. Sewall's sermon on the death of Rev. Ebenezer Pemberton, Dr. Mather fully corroborates the foregoing testimony: In the same week another faithful minister of God was taken away, viz. the Rev. Mr. William Brattle, pastor of the church in Cambridge, whom also I had reason to have an intimate ace discorag'd: went back & lodg'd wt abundance of heartiness at Mr. Belchers. Mr. White & I trudg'd throa up to ye South, where I knew Mr. Colman was to preach in ye forenoon, when he design'd to give the separate character of Mr. Pemb., [Rev. Ebenezer Pemberton, who died Feb. 13, 1717] wc yr wasn't time for on ye Lecture, wc he did sweetly & well: telling how emulous he always was to excell; his candle envied, &c., yt when we saw him stand up how our expectations wr always rais'd & yt he always
had Boradel, bap. 14 Ap. 1765, m. William Cooper 1 Sept. 1784. 14. Josiah, s. of Jonathan (10), by w. Elizabeth had Pemberton, bap. 29 Oct. 1769; William, ,ap. 10 June 1770; Sarah, hap. 12 Dec. 1773, d. of consumption, at the almshouse, 6 Jan. so to have been the last representative of royal authority in the Province; for when Governor Gage returned to England, Pemberton says in his Manuscript Chronology (in the Mass. Hist. Soc. Lib.), under date of 10 Oct. 1775, Sir William Howe succeedn Mar. 1772. She must have lived at least until 14 Aug. 1776, if she entered her 106th year. Under date of Mar. 1774, Pemberton says, Died this month at Cambridge the widow Abigail Mayo, aged 106 years (Man. Gen.); but Pemberton's dates are not aPemberton's dates are not always accurate. It seems certain that she was living in Mar. 1772, and she may have survived the 14th of August 1776. Her great grandson, Edward Sparhawk, Esq., who was b. 29 Nov. 1770 and d. 3 Sept. 1867, informed his pastor, the Rev. Frederic A.
ad of Camb. 22 Jan. 1771, was ord. at Fryeburg, Me., Oct. 1775, and d. May 1805. Stephen, bap. 20 May 1750; Mary, bap. 1 Mar. 1751-2; Nicholas, bap. 8 Sept. 1754; Ebenezer, bap. 13 Feb. 1757. William the f. taught the Grammar School in Camb. several years, and d. of apoplexy 17 June 1758, a. 39. 13. Jonathan, s. of Jonathan (10), m. Elizabeth Parker 2 Sept. 1763, and had Boradel, bap. 14 Ap. 1765, m. William Cooper 1 Sept. 1784. 14. Josiah, s. of Jonathan (10), by w. Elizabeth had Pemberton, bap. 29 Oct. 1769; William, ,ap. 10 June 1770; Sarah, hap. 12 Dec. 1773, d. of consumption, at the almshouse, 6 Jan. 1797, a. 23; Josiah, bap. 7 July 1776; James, bap. 9 Aug. 1778, d. at the almshouse 14 Sept. 1795, a. 17. Josiah the f. d. at the almshouse 15 Ap. 1793, a. 17. 15. Samuel, s. of Jonathan (10), was a victualler on the south side of the river, and in. Sarah Spring 23 Nov. 1762. Administration on his estate was granted 4 Aug. 1772 to his w. Sarah, and guardians were appo
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