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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 50 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 41 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 37 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 30 10 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 30 0 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 24 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 19 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Pender or search for Pender in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
rties, and will be so everywhere. Now a word about North Carolinians in this charge at Gettysburg, and of what I was an eye witness. On the morning of the 3rd I had been put in command, by order of General Lee, of two of the brigades of General Pender, who had been wounded. These were both of North Carolina troops, commanded by J. H. Lane and Alfred M. Scales. On taking command of these troops, entire strangers to me, and wishing as far as I could to inspire them with confidence, I addrehus greatly oblige, Yours, with much respect, John W. Daniel. Baltimore, November 24th, 1875. Jno. W. Daniel, Esq.: Dear Sir,--Your favor of 22d received. As respects the errors made in your able address in Richmond, as to the action of Pender's division, under my command, they are not very important, but may as well be corrected. First. You state that Our left, under Trimble, staggered at the start, &c. That is an error; there was no hesitation in my command at the start, for at f
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia, or the boys in gray, as I saw them from Harper's Ferry in 1861 to Appomattox Court-house in 1865. (search)
It was my proud privilege to follow the fortunes of the Army of Northern Virginia, from Harper's Ferry, in 1861, to Appomattox Court-house, in 1865. Entering the service as high private in the rear rank, and afterward acting as chaplain in both Stonewall Jackson's and A. P. Hill's corps, I had some peculiar facilities for seeing and knowing what occurred. Personally acquainted with Robert E. Lee, J. E. Johnston, Beaureguard, Jackson, Stuart, Ewell, A. P. Hill, Early, Edward Johnson, Rodes, Pender, Heth, Wilcox, Hampton, Fitzhugh Lee, W. H. F. Lee, John B. Gordon, Pegram, J. A. Walker, and a large number of others of our leading officers, I at the same time made it my duty to know thoroughly the unknown private of the rank and file. I marched with him along the weary road; I bivouaced with him in the pelting storm; I shared with him the rough delights of the camp; I joined with him in those delightful services which proved that Jesus was often in the army with a power rarely witnesse