Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Pendleton or search for Pendleton in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The charge of the Crater. (search)
long ditch and placed the bodies crosswise, several layers up, and then refilled it. After they had finished burying their dead and were moving off, General Mahone noticed that they had left the dirt piled high enough for breastworks on the slope of the hill, midway between the two lines of battle. He quickly discovered the danger of this, as it would have afforded shelter for another assaulting column. He stopped the burial detail and made them level the ground, as they found it. General Pendleton, Chief of Artillery of General Lee's army, was standing near, and paid a high compliment to Mahone's foresight. The last act in the great battle. This was the last act in this celebrated battleā€”a battle won by the charge of three small brigades of Virginia, Georgia and Alabama troops, numbering less than 2,000 muskets, with the aid of the artillery, which rendered effective service to the charging columns, over an army of 70,000 men behind breast-works, which surrendered to this
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson, Confederate States army. (search)
urg, an interesting incident occurred. General Jackson had had some misunderstanding with Gregg, the nature of which I do not now recall. The night after this gallant gentleman and splendid soldier was mortally wounded, I told General Jackson, as I generally did of friends or prominent men killed and wounded. General Gregg was one of the most courteous and gallant gentlemen that I had ever known. He exposed himself that day in a way that seemed unneccessary, so much so indeed, that Colonel Pendleton, of Jackson's staff, rode up to him and, knowing he was quite deaf, shouted to him that the Yankees were shooting at him. Yes, sir, thank you, he replied, they have been doing so all day. When I told General Jackson that Gregg was badly injured, he said: I wish you would go back and see him, I want you to see him. I demurred a little, saying it had not been very long since I had seen him, and that there was nothing more to be done for him. He said: I wish you to go back and see him
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.43 (search)
nd Cavalry, Hampshire county. W. T. Mitchell, Sixth Cavalry, Pittsylvania county. T. A. Moon, Sixth Cavalry, Halifax county. A. M. King, Fiftieth Infantry, Saltville, Lee county. B. G. Brown, Seventh Infantry, Brown's Cove, Albemarle co. Charles D. McCoy, Twenty-fifth Infantry, Charlottesville. William C. Nunn, Fifth Cavalry, Little Plymouth. Peyton Alfriend, Thirty-ninth Militia, Petersburg. Bruce Gibson, Sixth cavalry, Upperville, Fauquier county. George W. Nelson, General Pendleton's staff, Beaver Dam, Hanover county. C. J. Lewis, Eighth Cavalry, Charleston, Kanawha county. Adjutants. D. M. Leyton, Twenty-fifth Infantry, Mount Meridian. B. B. Howelett, Fifth Cavalry, Cobb's creek. O. H. P. Lewis, Thirty-first Infantry, Beverly, Randolph county. W. W. Boggs, Twentieth Cavalry, Wheeling. J. Arrington, Forty-second Infantry, Campbell Courthouse. D. W. Garrett, Forty-second Infantry, Morgantown, Ga. H. T. Coalter, Fifty-third Infantry, King Willi