hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 67 13 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 60 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 35 13 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for A. S. Pendleton or search for A. S. Pendleton in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
part, by his selection of successive chiefs for his staff, none of whom had even snuffed the classical air of West Point or Lexington, my intended predecessor and actual successor (J. A. Armstrong and C. J. Faulkner), and the next successor (A. S. Pendleton), but chiefly by the selection of me, a man of peace, and soldier of the Prince of Peace, innocent, even in youth, of any tincture of military knowledge. Herein was indeed a strange thing; that I, the parson, tied to him by no blood tie, or loss here was nothing like so heavy as at Winchester, the injury done to the morale of the army was much greater. In both battles the Confederates lost valuable officers. At Winchester fell Rodes, Godwin, and Patton, at Fisher's Hill fell A. S. Pendleton, the Assistant Adjutant General of the army—a costly offering upon their country's altar. Sheridan now marched forward with little opposition. Early fell back before him to Brown's Gap, while the Federals pushed on to Staunton and Waynes
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson. (search)
be next his person at all, was characteristic of Jackson. He, who was an alumnus of the military academy at West Point, and nothing but a professional military man all his life, was least bound in professional trammels. This trait he signified, in part, by his selection of successive chiefs for his staff, none of whom had even snuffed the classical air of West Point or Lexington, my intended predecessor and actual successor (J. A. Armstrong and C. J. Faulkner), and the next successor (A. S. Pendleton), but chiefly by the selection of me, a man of peace, and soldier of the Prince of Peace, innocent, even in youth, of any tincture of military knowledge. Herein was indeed a strange thing; that I, the parson, tied to him by no blood tie, or interest, and by acquaintanceship only slightest and most transient; that I, at home nursing myself into partial convalescence from tedious fever, contracted in the performance of my spiritual functions among the soldiers of the previous campaign; t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
22, at Fisher's Hill, inflicted another defeat upon the Confederates. Here, he, under cover of the forest, outflanked Early's left and stampeded it. This quickly led to the abandonment of his whole line, and the loss of eleven guns. Though Early's loss here was nothing like so heavy as at Winchester, the injury done to the morale of the army was much greater. In both battles the Confederates lost valuable officers. At Winchester fell Rodes, Godwin, and Patton, at Fisher's Hill fell A. S. Pendleton, the Assistant Adjutant General of the army—a costly offering upon their country's altar. Sheridan now marched forward with little opposition. Early fell back before him to Brown's Gap, while the Federals pushed on to Staunton and Waynesboroa. Kershaw's infantry and Rosser's cavalry were sent to Early's aid, and in a short time he was ready for fight again. The Confederate cavalry was so active that Sheridan found it difficult to protect his supply trains, and considered it imprac