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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 7, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for S. H. Pendleton or search for S. H. Pendleton in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
[J. H.] Chamberlayne. Dickenson's Battery, Captain [C.] Dickenson. Otey's Battery, Captain [D. N.] Walker. Second corps Artillery. Brigadier-General A. L. Long. Braxton's Battalion. Major Carter M. Braxton. Lee Battery, Lieutenant W. W. Hardwicke. First Maryland Artillery, Captain W. F. Dement. Stafford Artillery, Captain W. T. Cooper. Alleghany Artillery, Captain J. C Carpenter. Carter's Battalion. Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas H. Carter. Morris Artillery, Captain S. H. Pendleton. Orange Artillery, Captain C. W. Fry. King William Artillery, Captain William P. Carter. Jeff. Davis Artillery, Captain W. J. Reese. Cutshaw's Battalion. Major [W. E.] Cutshaw. Charlottesville Artillery, Captain J. McD. Carrington. Staunton Artillery, Captain A. W. Garber. Courtney Artillery, Captain W. A. Tanner. Nelson's Battalion. Lieutenant-Colonel [William] Nelson. Amherst Artillery, Captain T. J. Kirkpatrick. Milledge Artillery, Captain John Milledge
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Contributions to the history of the Confederate Ordnance Department. (search)
t Richmond. Progress of manufacture. Colonel Rains, in the course of the Summer of 1861, established a refinery of saltpetre at or near Nashville, and to this point chiefly were sent the nitre, obtained from the State of Georgia, and that derived from caves in East and Middle Tennessee. He supplied the two powder mills in that State with nitre, properly refined, and good powder was thus produced. A small portion of the Georgia nitre was sent to two small mills in South Carolina,—at Pendleton and Walhalla—and a powder produced, inferior at first, but afterwards improved. The State of North Carolina established a mill near Raleigh, under contract with certain parties to whom the State was to furnish the nitre, of which a great part was derived from caves in Georgia. A stamping mill was also put up near New Orleans, and powder produced before the fall of the city. Small quantities of powder were also received through the blockade from Wilmington to Galveston, some of it of ver
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Progress of manufacture. (search)
Progress of manufacture. Colonel Rains, in the course of the Summer of 1861, established a refinery of saltpetre at or near Nashville, and to this point chiefly were sent the nitre, obtained from the State of Georgia, and that derived from caves in East and Middle Tennessee. He supplied the two powder mills in that State with nitre, properly refined, and good powder was thus produced. A small portion of the Georgia nitre was sent to two small mills in South Carolina,—at Pendleton and Walhalla—and a powder produced, inferior at first, but afterwards improved. The State of North Carolina established a mill near Raleigh, under contract with certain parties to whom the State was to furnish the nitre, of which a great part was derived from caves in Georgia. A stamping mill was also put up near New Orleans, and powder produced before the fall of the city. Small quantities of powder were also received through the blockade from Wilmington to Galveston, some of it of very inferior qu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Further details of the death of General A. P. Hill. (search)
nes to suffer. Some may ask how it was that I, a courier in artillery, should have been in that locality. I was a mere boy, fond of excitement, and it so happened that our quarters were in the yard of a Mr. Whitworth, who lived almost south of General Lee's headquarters. I was awake all Saturday night, looking at the mortar and other shells, and when the enemy, on Sunday morning, came too close to our quarters to be comfortable, our wagon was packed and sent with all but myself to General Pendleton's headquarters. I remained, fed my mare, and held my position until the enemy were close enough for me to see how many had been shaved Saturday, and then I moved out, receiving as I went cheers or yells from the enemy, for which compliments I did not stop to thank them. When I got down in the bottom I stopped my mare in the branch, and was letting her drink, when General Hill came up, as before stated. I think General Lane will recollect my coming to him later in the day, when he w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of the Virginia division army of Northern Virginia Association (search)
sed at Williamsport, supported by some infantry and artillery, and by his demonstrations having kept McClellan in doubt as to Lee's intentions, and drawn Couch's division to resist him. On the 20th he repassed again to the Virginia side. General Pendleton had been left by Lee with the reserve artillery to cover Boteler's Ford. Fitz John Porter determined to cross the river and drive him off. He lined the Maryland side with skirmishers and sharpshooters, supported them by the division of Morty, but by some misunderstanding the order did not reach him in time. The movement was made at dark, and resulted in the capture of four pieces, among them one taken from the Federals at First Manassas, from Battery D, of the Fifth artillery. Pendleton was driven back in confusion. At 6.30, next morning, A. P. Hill moved back, and half a mile from Boteler's Ford formed his line of battle in two lines; the first of the brigades of Pender, Gregg and Thomas, under Gregg; and the second, of Lane