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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 76 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 39 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 37 5 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 28 0 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 25 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 24 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 21 3 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 14 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for W. N. Pendleton or search for W. N. Pendleton in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia, or the boys in gray, as I saw them from Harper's Ferry in 1861 to Appomattox Court-house in 1865. (search)
lzey, of the First Maryland regiment, was now put in command of our brigade, which was made to consist of the Thirteenth Virginia, Third Tennessee, Tenth Virginia, and First Maryland, and we had a season of constant drilling, heavy guard duty, and rigid discipline. On the 21st of July, Colonel Jackson had a sharp skirmish at Falling Waters with the advance of General Patterson's army, in which, with 300 of the Fifth Virginia regiment, and one piece of artillery (commanded by Captain Rev. Dr. Pendleton), he kept back, for some time, two brigades of the enemy, and retired when about to be flanked, bringing off forty-five prisoners and inflicting other loss, with a loss on his part of only two killed and six or eight wounded. General Johnston at once advanced his whole army to Darkesville, six miles from Martinsburg, where we found Jackson awaiting us, and where, for four days, we remained in line of battle, and, with a force of not quite 9,000, threw down the guage to General Patte
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. where is General Nathaniel Green of Revolutionary fame buried? (search)
Notes and Queries. where is General Nathaniel Green of Revolutionary fame buried? Our attention has been recently called to the fact that the grave of this distinguished General and noble patriot is now unknown. His remains were originally deposited in the vault of Major Pendleton, of Savannah, but they were afterwards removed, and the patriot-soldier now rests, so far as we are able to learn, in an unknown grave. If we have been misinformed, or if any one can give details concerning this interesting question, we should be glad to hear from him.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 10.92 (search)
The artillery of the A. N. V. In the last campaign and at the surrender. Report of General W. N. Pendleton, Chief of artillery, army of Northern Virginia. Headquarters artillery corps, Army N. Va., Appomattox Courthouse, April 10, 1865. Colonel W. H. Taylor, A. A. General A. N. V.: Colonel,--I have the honor to submitn the lines near Richmond and Petersburg, only sixty-one remained, and thirteen caissons. I have the honor to be-- Respectfully, your obedient servant, W. N. Pendleton, Brigadier: General and Chief of Artillery. Letter from General A. L. Long. Charlottesville, Va., October 19, 1881. General,--Having heard freque characterized it on more hopeful fields, and when the last blow was struck the veterans of a hundred battles did not conceal the manly tears that flowed in sorrow for the lost cause. Very respectfully, A. L. long, Chief of Artillery Second Corps, Army of Northern Virginia. General W. N. Pendleton, Chief of Artillery A. N. V.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Longstreet's division. (search)
th General Evans's brigade, where it bore a conspicuous part in the the affair at Ball's Bluff, on the 21st of October. The remaining brigades of the army were about the same time thrown into three other divisions of three brigades each and commanded by Major-Generals G. W. Smith, E. Kirby Smith, and Earl Van Doon. Thus constituted, and with a small cavalry force under General Stuart holding the outposts beyond Halifax C. H. and a General Reserve Artillery of ten batteries under Colonel W. N. Pendleton, the army went into quarters. As the great majority of the army were volunteers enlisted for only twelve months, great concern was felt in the winter of 1861 and 1862, that steps should be taken to keep up the number in the field during the ensuing summer, and the Confederate Congress took up the subject at an early day. After much discussion, a law was passed and published to the army on the 1st of January, 1862, offering to all twelve months volunteers, who should reenlist, a f
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
rder every battery to move into action, and to continue firing as long as the battle lasted. A message came from General Lee, and Jackson had scarcely uttered his crisp Very well! when he suddenly wheeled his horse and said to the gallant Captain Pendleton of his staff: Go to the line and see all of the commanders. Tell them this thing has hung in suspense too long; sweep the field with the bayonet. Pendleton galloped off on his perilous mission, but had hardly gotten out of sight when a Pendleton galloped off on his perilous mission, but had hardly gotten out of sight when a ringing rebel yell ran along our whole line and proclaimed that our reserves had gotten fully into action — that the enemy were being driven from the field, and that the victory was ours. Darkness closed in upon the scene, and there followed a night with the wounded, and a mourning for the gallant dead. General McClellan speaks of our forces in this battle as embracing overwhelming numbers, and this theory is adopted by most Northern writers on the subject. But the field returns of both ar