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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 76 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 39 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 37 5 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 28 0 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 25 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 24 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 21 3 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 14 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for W. N. Pendleton or search for W. N. Pendleton in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
on the evening of January 15th, there has passed away another of our prominent Confederate leaders. As classmate of General R. E. Lee at West Point, his Chief of Artillery during the war, and his Pastor during his residence in Lexington, General Pendleton was closely connected with our great chieftain in life, and now sleeps well, hard by his grave, while the spirits of the two soldiers, who were faithful to cross and country, doubtless bask together in the smiles of the great Captain of our Salvation. Of strong intellect, broad culture, firm convictions, devoted patriotism, earnest piety, and evangelical spirit, Dr. Pendleton made his impress on the age in which he lived, and will be sadly missed, not only in Lexington, but in the State and land which he loved so well and served so faithfully. General B. G. Humphries, of Miss., has also joined the column which has crossed over the river to rest under the shade of the trees, leaving behind him the stainless name of a gallant
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
on the evening of January 15th, there has passed away another of our prominent Confederate leaders. As classmate of General R. E. Lee at West Point, his Chief of Artillery during the war, and his Pastor during his residence in Lexington, General Pendleton was closely connected with our great chieftain in life, and now sleeps well, hard by his grave, while the spirits of the two soldiers, who were faithful to cross and country, doubtless bask together in the smiles of the great Captain of our Salvation. Of strong intellect, broad culture, firm convictions, devoted patriotism, earnest piety, and evangelical spirit, Dr. Pendleton made his impress on the age in which he lived, and will be sadly missed, not only in Lexington, but in the State and land which he loved so well and served so faithfully. General B. G. Humphries, of Miss., has also joined the column which has crossed over the river to rest under the shade of the trees, leaving behind him the stainless name of a gallant
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Lee Memorial Association. (search)
an escort of ten students from Richmond College, and was met by the Lee Memorial Association, the officers, faculty, and students of Washington and Lee University; the officers, faculty, and cadets of the Virginia Military Institute; and the citizens of Lexington and vicinity, among whom were many little girls and ladies laden with floral tributes, all eager to show respect to the memory of the immortal Lee. Among the men of distinction present were Governor Letcher, General Early, General Pendleton, General Smith, and others. The young gentlemen of Richmond College, composing the guard of honor, performed their responsible task handsomely and successfully, although confronted by serious difficulties on the way, and merit the thanks of all interested in the noble work of art, which they kindly volunteered to accompany. As soon as the wagon bearing the statue was drawn ashore, the procession, consisting of the elements named above, moved towards Lexington under the conduct o