hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 43 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 7 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 17 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 15 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for William N. Pendleton or search for William N. Pendleton in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), War Diary of Capt. Robert Emory Park, Twelfth Alabama Regiment. January 28th, 1863January 27th, 1864. (search)
which had been previously sent in seach of me to the 13th, 15th, 3rd and 5th Ala. regiments, before reaching the 12th Ala. April 25. Rev. F. M. Kennedy, a North Carolina chaplain, preached at Round Oak Church. It was an able sermon. General Wm. N. Pendleton had been expected, but failed to come. April 26. Sunday. Leiutenant T. W. Harris, of the 12th Georgia, and R. M. Boring (my classmate) of the 4th Georgia, came to see me, and Harris preached a fine sermon. April 27. Completed Del some Yankee cavalry pickets, whom our sharpshooters under Major Blackford of the 5th Alabama quickly dispersed. We followed closely, and they evacuated Jeffersonton, falling back to the river, and crossing a bridge near Warrenton Springs. General Pendleton, chief of artillery, placed twelve pieces of cannon on a lofty hill immediately in front of my regiment, and commenced a rapid and destructive fire across the river, driving the enemy some distance beyond. As soon as it was ascertained tha
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate cause and its defenders. (search)
d by Vallandingham, of Ohio, with such boldness and ability as to cause his arrest and temporary imprisonment. In the Presidential contest of that year, Lincoln and Johnson were the candidates of the Republican, or war party, and McClellan and Pendleton were those of the Democratic, or peace party. The convention which nominated McClellan and Pendleton was one of the most representative bodies that ever assembled in this country. It met in the city of Chicago on the 29th of August, 1864, witPendleton was one of the most representative bodies that ever assembled in this country. It met in the city of Chicago on the 29th of August, 1864, with Governor Horatio Seymour, of New York, as its chairman. An idea of the temper of the convention may be gathered from an extract from one of the speeches delivered in it by Rev. C. Chauncey Burr, of New Jersey, which is as follows: We had no right to burn their wheat-fields, steal their pianos, spoons or jewelry. Mr. Lincoln had stolen a good many thousand negroes, but for every negro he had thus stolen, he had stolen ten thousand spoons. It had been said that, if the South would lay