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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Friendly Association. (search)
he commonwealth towards the Indians and the white people, and exasperated both by their greed and covetousness. The Indians were made thoroughly discontented by the frauds practised on them in the purchase of lands and the depredations of banditti called traders. So much had they become alienated from the English that in 1755 the Delawares and others joined the French in making var. For some time the Friends, or Quakers, had observed with sorrow the treatment of the Indians by Thomas and John Penn and the traders, and, impelled by their uniform sympathy with the oppressed, they formed a society in 1756 called the Friendly Association for Regaining and Preserving Peace with the Indians by Pacific Measures. The society was a continual thorn in the sides of the proprietors and Indian traders, for the active members of the association watched the interests of the red men with keen vigilance, attended every treaty, and prevented a vast amount of fraud and cheating in the dealings of the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Penn, John 1741-1788 (search)
Penn, John 1741-1788 A signer of the Declaration of Independence; born in Caroline county, Va., May 17, 1741; studied law with Edmund Pendleton; was an eloquent and effective speaker; and possessed a high order of talent. In 1774 he settled in Greenville county, N. C., and was a delegate in the Continental Congress from there in 1775-76 and 1778-80. Mr. Penn was placed in charge of public affairs in North Carolina when Cornwallis invaded the State in 1781. He died in North Carolina int. In 1774 he settled in Greenville county, N. C., and was a delegate in the Continental Congress from there in 1775-76 and 1778-80. Mr. Penn was placed in charge of public affairs in North Carolina when Cornwallis invaded the State in 1781. He died in North Carolina in September, 1788. The American Penn, born in Philadelphia, Pa., Feb. 29, 1700; son of William Penn by his second wife; was the only male descendant of the founder who remained a Quaker. He died in England in October, 1746.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Penn, William 1644- (search)
pied it while lie remained in America, and there his son, John Penn, governor of Pennsylvania when the Revolution broke out, was born. In that house the agent of Penn (James Logan) entertained Lord Cornbury, of New York, and his suite of fifty perse present and future peace of Europe. This was published by Penn in the latter part of the year 1693-94, while war was raging on the Continent. Penn sought to show the desirableness of peace and the truest means of it at that time and for the futu should agree to constitute a General Diet or Slate-roof (Penn's) House in Philadelphia. congress of nations, wherein ea 1693. It is not included in the original folio edition of Penn's works, but finds place in one of the later editions. It irs of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, vol. VI. Penn's plan for the federation and peace of Europe, doubly inter date is the Great design of Henry IV. of France, to which Penn himself refers in his essay. The original account of this
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), State of Pennsylvania, (search)
nia Assembly, in 1764, to enact a new militia law brought on another quarrel between the proprietaries and the representatives of the people. One of the former, John Penn, was now governor. He claimed the right to appoint the officers of the militia, and insisted upon several other provisions, to which the Assembly would not givePalmerPresident1747 James HamiltonDeputy Governor1748 Robert H. MorrisDeputy Governor1754 William DennyDeputy Governor1756 James HamiltonDeputy Governor1759 John PennGovernor1763 James HamiltonPresident1771 Richard PennGovernor1771 John PennGovernor1773 [Proprietary government ended by the Constitution of 1776. The reprJohn PennGovernor1773 [Proprietary government ended by the Constitution of 1776. The representatives of the Penn family were paid for the surrender of their rights, and a government by the people established.] State governors. Thomas WhartonPresident (died in office 1778)1777 George BryanActing. Joseph ReedPresident1778 William MoorePresident1781 John DickinsonPresident1782 Benjamin FranklinPresident1785 Thom
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pennymite and Yankee War. (search)
s of the Susquehanna Company entered the Wyoming Valley and invested the block-house, garrisoned by ten men, who gave Governor Penn notice of the situation. Three of the Connecticut men were lured into the blockhouse under pretence of making an adje the Yankees. Meanwhile the company had sent commissioners to Philadelphia to confer upon a compromise. The governor (Penn) refused to receive them, and sent an armed force, under Colonel Francis, into the valley. The sheriff joined Francis wittified his house. Imitating the bad faith of their opponents, the Yankees seized his property and burned his house. Governor Penn now (1770) called upon General Gage, in command of the British troops at New York, for a detachment to restore order our years peace smiled upon the beautiful valley. Suddenly, in the autumn of 1775, the Pennsylvanians, encouraged by Governor Penn, renewed the civil war, killing and imprisoning the inhabitants. The Continental Congress interfered in vain; but wh
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Quakers. (search)
by Congress for this act was that when the enemy were pressing on towards Philadelphia in December, 1777, a certain seditious publication, addressed To our Friends and Brethren in Religious Profession in these and the adjacent Provinces, signed John Pemberton, in and on behalf of the Meeting of sufferings, held in Philadelphia, Dec. 26, 1776, had been widely circulated among Friends throughout the States. At the same time the Congress instructed the board of war to send to Fredericksburg John Penn, the governor, and Benjamin Chew, chief-justice of Pennsylvania, for safe custody. While the British army was in Philadelphia in 1778, Joseph Galloway, an active Tory, and others employed John Roberts and Abraham Carlisle, members of the Society of Friends, as secret agents in detecting foes to the British government. Carlisle was a sort of inquisitorgeneral, watching at the entrances to the city, pointing out and causing the arrest of Whigs, who were first cast into prison and then gran
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), North Carolina, (search)
k, having Governor Martin on board, and sail for Charleston......May 29, 1776 Declaration of Independence of the United States read before the court-house in Halifax by Cornelius Harnett......Aug. 1, 1776 Joseph Hewes, William Hooper, and John Penn, for North Carolina, sign the Declaration of Independence......Aug. 2, 1776 A congress chosen by election assembles at Halifax, Nov. 12, 1776, frames a constitution for North Carolina not submitted to the people, elects Richard Caswell governor by ordinance, and completes its labors......Dec. 18, 1776. Articles of confederation ratified by North Carolina......April 5, 1778 John Penn, Cornelius Harnett, and John Williams sign the articles of confederation on the part of North Carolina......July 21, 1778 Four hundred North Carolina Whigs under Col. Francis Locke attack a camp of Tories under Lieut.-Col. John Moore, and rout them at Ramsour's Mill, near Lincolnton......June 20, 1780 Battle of Charlotte......Sept. 26, 1780
discharged from the airpump. The feedpumps are supplied with water from this hotwell, through the medium of a pipe, the overplus being discharged through the side of the vessel by another pipe (not shown). Napier's direct-action steam-engine. Penn's marine steam-engine. In Penn's direct-action steamengine, a is the cylinder; b the piston-rod, carrying the cross-head c c; this latter consists of four arms, branching diagonally from the center. On each side two side-rods d d are suspendePenn's direct-action steamengine, a is the cylinder; b the piston-rod, carrying the cross-head c c; this latter consists of four arms, branching diagonally from the center. On each side two side-rods d d are suspended from the extremities of the arms c c of the cross-head, and are attached at the lower end to a cross-bar, in the center of which is a pin, to which the forked end of the arm g of the connecting-rod h is coupled; i i are two guiderods, upon which the bar e slides, the rods passing through brass bushes attached to the side of the bar; k is the crank, and m the side frame; n the slide-case, and p the steam pipe. Di′rect-draft. In steam-boilers, when the hot air and smoke pass off in a sing
, and all entire, is less than a troy ounce! The actual weight of the working part of the engines — that is, all excepting the boiler — is just that of a sovereign. One of the tiniest working models in the world is now in the possession of John Penn (of Greenwich), the eminent maker of the great engines of which it is the reduced counterpart. It will stand on an English silver 3 d. piece; it really covers less space, for its base-plate measures only 3/8 of an inch by about 3/10. The engines are of the trunk form introduced by Penn; the cylinders measure 1/8 of an inch in diameter, and the trunk 1/20. The length of stroke is 3/40 of an inch. They are fitted with reversing gear, and are generally similar in design to the great machines with which ships of the Warrior class are equipped. From the extreme smallness of this model a few minutiae — such, for instance, as the air-pumps — have necessarily been omitted; so small are some of the parts, that they require a powerful m
nects directly to the crank. It was invented by James Watt, and was brought into use by Maudslay. Watt's model, made at Soho in 1763, was exhibited at the London Exhibition of 1851. Witty of Hull patented the oscillating cylinder in England in 1813. English patent, June 5. Goldsworth Gurney was in some way associated with the improvement of it, and has been credited with the invention. It was introduced by those two famous makers of marine and river engines, Maudslay and Field and Penn and Sons. This engine has a cylinder mounted on gudgeons or trunnions, generally near the middle of its length, on which it is capable of swaying to and fro through a small arc, so as to enable the piston-rod to follow the movements of the crank, to which it is directly attached without the intervention of a connectingrod. This construction is economical of space and weight. The trunnions are hollow, and are connected by steam-tight joints, one with a steam-pipe leading from the boiler
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