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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 436 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 315 1 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 58 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 46 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 1. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 40 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Isaac T. Hopper: a true life 26 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 14 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 12 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
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William A. Smith, DD. President of Randolph-Macon College , and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy., Lectures on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery as exhibited in the Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United States: withe Duties of Masters to Slaves., Lecture VII: the institution of domestic slavery. (search)
the doctrine and the hypothetical assumption on which it is based. 1. If the doctrine be true, it will follow that all wrong is without any remedy, except in the few cases in which things may be restored to their original state. This would be a deplorable state of things indeed. It would work special disaster to our Northern brethren. For, first, if this doctrine be true, they own scarcely one foot of honest land; nor is there any in the whole country, save the original purchase of William Penn, and a few other unappreciable portions of territory. The Indians were the original and rightful owners of this whole country, according to the theory of rights which forms the basis of this doctrine. From the most of their possessions they were forcibly ejected at the peril of life as well as liberty; and from the remainder they were driven by a policy which in civilized life would be held and treated as knavery. These lands, according to this doctrine, should in all honesty be restor
d she was the property of one Major Carney; but at his death, she, with all his people, was by his will made free. In my fourteenth year, when I had no work to do, I attended a private and secret school, kept in Norfolk by a minister. In my fifteenth year I embraced the Gospel; at that time I was also engaged in the coasting trade with my father. In 1856, I left the sea for a time, and my father set out to look for a place to live in peace and freedom. He first stopped in the land of William Penn, Benjamin Franklin, and where the bright Juniata flows--Pennsylvania--but he rested not there; the black man was not secure on the soil where the Declaration of Independence was written. He went far. Then he visited the Empire State--great New-York — whose chief ambition seemed to be for commerce and gold, and with her unceasing struggle for supremacy, she heard not the slave; she only had time to spurn the man with the sable skin, and made him feel that he was an alien in his native lan
r of Woburn, m. Ann Goodwin, Nov. 25, 1775.   Mary Kidder of Charlestown, d. Jan. 19, 1779.    Susanna Kidder d. Nov. 5, 1801, aged 19,ch. of Jas. and Susanna Kidder. Charles Kidder d. June 13, 1802, aged 15, Rebecca Kidder d. Oct. 23, 1814, aged 12,  1KNOX, Moses, son of John and Nancy (Cochran) Knox, was b. in Pembroke, N. H., Aug. 4, 1812; m., May 23, 1839, Abigail, dau. of Edward S. and Persis Phipps Walker, of Charlestown; and has--  1-2Joseph Henry, b. Aug. 27, 1842.  3William Penn, b. Mar. 2, 1845.  4Mary Adelaide, b. Feb. 11, 1849.  5Moses Edwards, b. Mar. 5, 1855. Sir Robert Lawrence, of Ashton Hall, was a descendant of Sir Robert Lawrence, knighted about 1190. This Sir Robert, of Ashton, had a third son, Nicholas Lawrence, of Agercroft, whose fourth son was John, who d. 1461, leaving a son, Thomas L., of Ramburgh, in Suffolk. This Thomas d. 1471, leaving John Lawrence, oldest son, whose will is dated 1504. John had an only son, Robert, whose son, J
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barclay, Robert, 1648-1690 (search)
tracted public sympathy to his co-religionists. The first remonstrance of Friends against war was put forth by Barclay in 1677, entitled a Treatise on universal love. Barclay made many religious journeys in England, Holland, and Germany with William Penn, and was several times imprisoned on account of the promulgation of his doctrines. Charles II. was Barclay's friend through the influence of Penn, and made his estate at Ury a free barony in 1679, with the privilege of criminal jurisdiction.many religious journeys in England, Holland, and Germany with William Penn, and was several times imprisoned on account of the promulgation of his doctrines. Charles II. was Barclay's friend through the influence of Penn, and made his estate at Ury a free barony in 1679, with the privilege of criminal jurisdiction. He was one of the proprietors of East Jersey, and in 1682 he was appointed its governor (see New Jersey) ; but he exercised the office by a deputy. He died in Ury, Oct. 13, 1690.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bradford, William, 1588-1657 (search)
ower, and was drowned. He succeeded John Carver (April 5, 1621) as governor of Plymouth colony. He cultivated friendly relations with the Indians; and he was annually rechosen governor as long as he lived, excepting in five years. He wrote a history of Plymouth colony from 1620 to 1647, which was published by the Massachusetts Historical Society in 1856. He died in Plymouth, Mass., May 9, 1657. printer; born in Leicester, England, in 1658. A Friend, or Quaker, he came to America with Penn's early colonists in 1682. and landed near the spot where Philadelphia was afterwards built. He had learned the printer's trade in London, and, in 1686, he printed an almanac in Philadelphia. Mixed up in a political and social dispute in Pennsylvania, and suffering thereby, he removed to New York in 1693, and in that year printed the laws of that colony. He began the first newspaper in New York. Oct. 16, 1725--the New York gazette. He was printer to the government of New York more than
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Claypoole, James 1634- (search)
Claypoole, James 1634- Settler; born in England in 1634; a Quaker, and a close friend of William Penn; was a witness of the signing of the Charter of Privileges granted to the settlers in 1682; came with his family to Pennsylvania in 1683, and held important offices.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Colonial settlements. (search)
n between the first settlements in Delaware, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, owing to their early political situation. The (present) State of Delaware remained in possession of the Dutch, and afterwards of the English, until it was purchased by William Penn, in 1682, and annexed to State of Pennsylvania (q. v.) So it remained until the Revolution as the Territories, when it became the State of Delaware (q. v.) The first permanent settlement in New Jersey (q. v.) was made at Elizabethtown in 1644. A province lying between New Jersey and Maryland was granted to William Penn, in 1681, for an asylum for his persecuted brethren, the Quakers, and settlements were immediately begun there, in addition to some already made by the Swedes within the domain. Unsuccessful attempts to settle in the region of the Carolinas had been made before the English landed on the shores of the James River. Some settlers went into North Carolina from Jamestown, between the years 1640 and 1650, and in 1663 a s
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Delaware, (search)
to lat. 40°; and settlers from Maryland attempted to drive away the settlers from the present State of Delaware. When William Penn obtained a grant of Pennsylvania, he was very desirous of owning the land on Delaware Bay to the sea, and procured froder of the territory. Lord Baltimore pressed his claim, but in 1685 the Lords of Trade and Plantations made a decision in Penn's favor. A compromise afterwards adjusted all conflicting claims. The tracts which now constitute the State of Delaware, Penn called The Territories, or Three Lower counties on the Delaware. They were governed as a part of Pennsylvania for about twenty years afterwards, and each county had six delegates in the legislature. Then Penn allowed them a separate legislaPenn allowed them a separate legislature; but the colony was under the governor of Pennsylvania until 1776, when the inhabitants declared it an independent State. A constitution was adopted by a convention of the people of the three counties—New Castle, Kent, and Sussex —Sept. 20, 177
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Delaware Indians, (search)
of the Delaware below Trenton, and the whole valley of the Schuylkill. After the conquest of New Netherland, the English kept up trade with the Delawares, and William Penn and his followers bought large tracts of land from them. They were parties on the Indian side to the famous treaty with Penn. At that time the Indians withinPenn. At that time the Indians within the limits of his domain were estimated at 6,000 in number. William Penn purchasing land from the Delaware Indians. The five Nations (q. v.) conquered the Delawares, and called them women in contempt; and when, at the middle of the eighteenth century, the latter, dissatisfied with the interpretation of a treaty, refused to lWilliam Penn purchasing land from the Delaware Indians. The five Nations (q. v.) conquered the Delawares, and called them women in contempt; and when, at the middle of the eighteenth century, the latter, dissatisfied with the interpretation of a treaty, refused to leave their land, the Five Nations haughtily ordered them to go. Commingling with warlike tribes, the Delawares became warlike themselves, and developed great energy on the war-path. They fought the Cherokees, and in 1773 some of them went over the mountains and settled in Ohio. As early as 1741 the Moravians had begun mission
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), De Peyster, Abraham, 1658-1728 (search)
De Peyster, Abraham, 1658-1728 Jurist; born in New Amsterdam (New York), July 8, 1658; eldest son of Johannes De Peyster, a noted merchant of his day. Between 1691 and 1695 he was mayor of the city of New York; was first assistant justice and then chief-justice of New York, and was one of the King's council under Governor Hyde (afterwards Lord Cornbury), and as its president was acting-governor for a time in 1701. Judge De Peyster was colonel of the forces in New York and treasurer of that province and New Jersey. He was a personal friend and correspondent of William Penn. Having amassed considerable wealth, he built a fine mansion, which stood, until 1856, in Pearl street. It was used by Washington as his headquarters for a while in 1776. He died in New York City Aug. 10, 1728.
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