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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 436 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 315 1 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 58 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 46 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 1. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 40 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Isaac T. Hopper: a true life 26 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 12 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for William Penn or search for William Penn in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry.—1764-1805. (search)
anded on the island of Campobello. Andrew became a so-called branch (i.e., commissioned) pilot, at Quoddy, and died suddenly in the service in the year 1813. His wife, whom he survived, though not long, was reputed the first person buried on Deer Island; and on this unfertile but picturesque and fascinating spot Fanny Lloyd was born in 1776, and became the belle of the family. She was of a tall, majestic figure, singularly graceful in People's Journal. (Eng.) Sept. 12, 1846, p. 141; Penn. Freeman, Mar. 25, 1847. deportment and carriage; her features were fine, and expressive of a high intellectual character; and her hair so luxuriant and rich that, when she unbound it, like that of Godiva of old, it fell around her like a veil. The outward being, however, was but a faint image of the angelic nature within; she was one of those who inspire at once love and reverence; she took high views of life and its duties; and, consequently, when adversity came upon her as an armed man,
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 4: editorial Experiments.—1826-1828. (search)
s after the publication of Whittier's first poem, a second, in blank verse, entitled The Deity, appeared, with an editorial Underwood's Life of Whittier, p. 396. paragraph declaring that his poetry bore the stamp of true poetic genius, which, if carefully cultivated, would rank him among the bards of his country. Other pieces followed, on such themes as The Vale of the Merrimack, The Death of Alexander, The Voice of Time, The Burial of the Princess Charlotte of Wales, To the Memory of William Penn, The Shipwreck, Paulowna, Memory, Benevolence, etc., but they are so little above mediocrity that it is not easy to see wherein Mr. Garrison so instantly discovered the stamp of genius and the presage of future distinction as a poet; and Mr. Whittier has never deemed them worth including in his collected poems. The copy of the Free Press containing his first poem was flung to the boy Whittier by the carrier or postrider, one day, while he was helping his uncle Moses repair a stone wall
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 11: first mission to England.—1833. (search)
ing the Colonization Society in the vein of his Thoughts, told how Clarkson had been deceived by its agent assuring him that its first object was to emancipate all the slaves, the chairman interrupted him, saying that this was a grave charge; Mr. Cresson was present—would he admit or deny having made such a statement? Cresson answered that he had done so,—a confession dictated not more by candor than by necessity, for Mr. Garrison was able to hand Mr. Cropper a pamphlet to which Report of Penn. Colon. Soc. for 1831. Cresson had furnished an introduction, declaring that the great object of the Colonization Society is the final and entire abolition of slavery; and Mr. George Thompson cited a placard of one of Cresson's meetings, headed, American Colonization Society and the Abolition of Slavery. Mr. Garrison then described with what feelings he heard Sir Robert Peel in the House of Commons Lib. 3.126, 167. a few days before June 3. Look at the consequences of emancipation in
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 12: American Anti-slavery Society.—1833. (search)
norable object of the members of this Convention to show to our countrymen that they have misunderstood the character, and misconceived the plans, of William Lloyd Garrison. He is said to be imprudent. What is prudence? Is it succumbing to a majority of our frail fellowmortals? Is it holding back a faithful expression of the whole truth, until the people are ready to say amen? Was that the prudence of the Apostle Paul, when he stood before the Roman Governor? Was that the prudence of William Penn, when he poured contempt on the regalia of kings by wearing before the King of England his broad beaver? Imprudence is moral timidity. That man is imprudent who is afraid to speak as God commands him to speak, when the hour of danger is near. If this reasoning be correct, Mr. Garrison is one of the most prudent men in the nation! He is not perfect. He is frail, like the rest of human flesh. But if God had not endowed him as he has, and smiled propitiously on his imprudences, we sh