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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 13 5 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 7 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 2 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 2 2 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington. You can also browse the collection for William H. Penrose or search for William H. Penrose in all documents.

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on the works at Petersburg. Fifteenth New Jersey Infantry. First Jersey Brigade — Wright's Division--Sixth Corps. (1) Col. Samuel Fowler. (2) Col. William H. Penrose, R. A. Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. A. (3) Col. Edward L. Campbell; Bvt. Brig. Gen. U. S. V. companies. killed and died of wounds. died of disease, acci 947 officers and men. Colonel Fowler was forced to resign within a few months on account of ill health, and died before the close of the war. He was succeeded by Penrose, then a Lieutenant in the Third United States Infantry. Lieutenant-Colonel Campbell had served with honor in the Third New Jersey, and, as Colonel Penrose was in Colonel Penrose was in command of the brigade much of the time, led the Fifteenth in most of its battles. The regiment joined the Army of the Potomac at Harper's Ferry on October 1, 1862, and was assigned to the First Jersey Brigade, Brooks's (1st) Division, Sixth Corps; it remained in the First Division during its entire term of service. It was under
early in the war by reason of the First and Second Jersey Brigades; in fact, any history of the Army of the Potomac would be incomplete and deficient were it without frequent mention of those gallant commands. The First Jersey Brigade, proper, consisted of the 1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th New Jersey, to which the 15th was added in 1862; the 10th, 23d, and 40th were also attached at various times. It was commanded successively by Generals Kearny, Taylor, Torbert, Colonel Brown (3d N. J.), and General Penrose. General Taylor was killed at Bull Run Bridge, while in command of the brigade. The Second Jersey Brigade was composed originally of the 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th Regiments, to which the 11th was subsequently added. Other regiments were attached to the brigade at different times. The Ninth New Jersey was a regiment which reflected credit on its State, and made a brilliant reputation in the Department in which it served. It fought in the battles along the North Carolina coast, and i