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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 2 0 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 6, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 28, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, Chapter 24: conclusion — military lessons of the War. (search)
and chosen from the army itself, or fresh from West Point, and too commonly construe themselves into the élite, as made of better clay than the common soldier. Thus they separate themselves more and more from their comrades of the line, and in process of time realize the condition of that old officer of artillery who thought the army would be a delightful place for a gentleman if it were not for the d----d soldier; or, better still, the conclusion of the young lord in Henry IV., who told Harry Percy (Hotspur) that but for these vile guns he would himself have been a soldier. This is all wrong; utterly at variance with our democratic form of government and of universal experience; and now that the French, from whom we had copied the system, have utterly proscribed it, I hope that our Congress will follow suit. I admit, in its fullest force, the strength of the maxim that the civil law should be superior to the military in time of peace; that the army should be at all times subject t
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 19: (search)
d and chosen from the army itself, or fresh from West Point, and too commonly construe themselves into the élite, as made of better clay than the common soldier. Thus they separate themselves more and more from their comrades of the line, and in process of time realize the condition of that old officer of artillery, who thought the army would be a delightful place for a gentleman if it were not for the d—d soldier; or, better still, the conclusion of the young lord in Henry IV., who told Harry Percy (Hotspur) that but for these vile guns he would himself have been a soldier. This is all wrong; utterly at variance with our democratic form of government and of universal experience; and now that the French, from whom we had copied the system, have utterly prescribed it, I hope that our Congress will follow suit. General Sherman's own military history, however, will show that it was not until he attained the rank of brigadier-general that his antipathy to staff duty began. But fro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sergeant Smith Prentiss and his career. (search)
d from the ideal world. He had lingered spellbound, among the scenes of mediaeval chivalry. His spirit had dwelt, until almost naturalized, in the mystic dreamland they peopled—among paladins and crusaders and Knights Templar; with Monmouth and Percy—with Bois-Gilbert and Ivanhoe, and the bold McGregor——with the cavaliers of Rupert, and the iron enthusiasts of Fairfax. As Judge Bullard remarks of him, he had the talent of an Italian improvisatore, and could speak the thoughts of poetry with The mightiest river Rolls mingling with his fame forever. The tidings of his death came like wailing over the State, and we all heard them as the toll of the bell for a brother's funeral. The chivalrous felt when they heard that young Harry Percy's spur was cold that the world had somehow grown commonplace, and the men of wit and genius, or those who could appreciate such qualities in others, looking over the surviving bar, exclaimed with a sigh: The blaze of wit, the flash of br
r anywhere else on the face of the earth, a dead level of social equality, we will, as Capt. Cuttle suggests, make a note of it, and give the enemies of South Carolina its full benefit. We don't know where, in the United States, there is any want of an inclination to imitate the aristocracies of Europe as closely as such a thing is possible in this new country. Perhaps the fault of South Carolina is, that she has succeeded more completely than any of her rivals, though on that point we don't pretend to decide. One thing is certain: She has acted in the present critical state of affairs with a dignity, intelligence, and firmness, that will make her name bright and imperishable on the pages of American history. The gallant Harry Percy of the South has not unsheathed his sword an hour too soon, and when he crosses his steel with his detestable foe, a million brave hearts will cheer him on, and a million bright swords start from their sheaths to sustain his noble and immortal cause.
Calling spirits. "I can call spirits from the vasty deep," Says Owen Glendower, when irritated by the alight regard Harry Percy was disposed to pay to his magical pretensions. "And so can I, and so can any man; But will they come when you do call for them?" Was the very natural and pertinent answer of the dauntless and incredulous Northumbrian. It would avail little for the skeptic to ask such a question of the Yankee spirit rappers. Their spirits always come when called for in the regular way. To be sure they do not generally appear to have been greatly improved by their residence in the other world, so far as style and language is concerned. Shakespeare, for instance, having been summoned from his long home to dictate a play to some Yankee recording clerk, makes quite a botch of the thing, and Byron, Moore, and Scott have all, under the same circumstances, failed in a manner that would have greatly perplexed Murray and the Longmans. Nevertheless, they occasi