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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 4 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 2 0 Browse Search
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Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 12: (search)
re the equals, if not the superiors, intellectually of the men at the head of the bureaus of the metropolitan newspapers of to-day. Among them were such men as Whitelaw Reid of the New York Tribune; J. B. McCullough of the Saint Louis Democrat; Alexander McClure of the Philadelphia Ledger; Horace White, Mr. Sheehan, of the Chicago Times; Murat Halstead, L. A. Gobright, E. B. Wight, George A. Townsend, J. Russell Young, subsequently librarian of the Congressional Library, W. Scott Smith, Eli Perkins, Charles Lanman, Don Piatt, Ben Perley Poore, E. V. Smalley, Mark Twain, Frederick Douglass, and a host of correspondents who have made enviable reputations in their calling. Among the women reporters who wielded influential pens as correspondents of important newspapers were Mary Clemmer Ames, Mrs. Lippincott, Mrs. H. M. Barnum, Mrs. Olivia Briggs, Mrs. Coggswell, Mrs. and Miss Snead, and Miss Mary E. Healey. General Grant soon nominated his cabinet, retaining those who had served d
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 9: the Western influence (search)
w content to let the reputation of our humor stand or fall by the quality of the American joke. Artemus War. So far as pure humor is concerned, there has never been a distinct boundary line between England and America. Nor can we say that what is called American humor belongs distinctively to the West. The early humorists were mostly of Eastern origin, though bred and emancipated in the Westthus Artemus Ward was from Maine, Josh Billings from Massachusetts, and Orpheus C. Kerr and Eli Perkins from New York. The prince among these jokers was Artemus Ward, who as a lecturer glided noiselessly upon the stage as if dressed for Hamlet, and looked as surprised as Hamlet if the audience laughed. The stage was dark, and the performance was interrupted by himself at intervals, to look for an imaginary pianist and singer who never came, but who became as real to the audience as Jefferson's imaginary dog Schneider in Rip Van Winkle, for whom he was always vainly whistling. This unsee
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Index. (search)
Ormond, Brown's, 70. Orpheus C. Kerr, 243. Ossoli, Margaret Fuller, 179, 180, 232. Outre-Mer, Longfellow's, 140. Ovid, 8. Paine, Thomas, 54, 55. Palfrey, John Gorham, 117. Paracelsus, Browning's, 262. Paradise lost, Milton's, 15. Parker, Theodore, 176, 178, 179, 233, 270. Parkman, Francis, 98, 118-121. Peter, 239. Parton, James, 119. Pater, Walter, 166. Pathfinder, Cooper's, 99. Pendennis, Thackeray's, 258. Penn, William, 74, 147. Pepper, Colonel, 235. Perkins, Eli, 243. Peter Rugg, the Missing man, Austin's, 187-189. Phi Beta Kappa, 155. Philanthropist, 149, 150. Phillips, Katharine, 12. Phillips, Wendell, 10, 43, 270. Piatt, John James, 264. Pickard, Samuel T., 150. Pickering, Thomas, 65. Pickwick papers, Dickens's, 90. Pinkney, Edward C., 216. Pioneers, Cooper's, 239. Pit, Norris's, 255. Poe, Edgar Allan, 90, 118, 143, 165, 190, 206-215, 231. Poor Richard's Aimanac, Franklin's, 58, 59. Pope, Alexander, 9, 40, 108, 158,