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s, Samuel J. Hamrick, Wm. H. Johnson, Griffith C. Pentecost, John H. Rose, George F. Sample, Elzy Swain, Wm. S. Smith, Henry B. Trout, Jacob Van Vatter, Henry Williams, Abner Ward. Escaped — Sergts. C. W. Smith and Edward W. Yaryan; Corporals Wallace Stanton and Cyrus D. Cross; privates Wm. Brown, Thos. C. Brown, Caspar C. Christ, Martin Egan, John Egan, Enoch Heavenridge, James S. Haynes, Watson Jones, Martin John, Jas. John, Geo. H. Moffitt, Charles Messer, Peter Morely, Asa Maloy, James Perkins, George Pierce, William Porter, James L. Bigger, Webster Snowden, John T. Schiff, John R. Sumter, Henry G. Van Rensellaer, George F. Ward, John W. Winchell, John H. Yaryan. Summary — Killed, one; supposed killed, one; wounded, eleven; missing, eleven; paroled prisoners, twenty-eight; escaped, twenty-nine; wounded and paroled, three; wounded and escaped, one; wounded and missing, one. To Laz Noble, Adjutant-General of Indiana: The undersigned would respectfully report the condition
s, Samuel J. Hamrick, Wm. H. Johnson, Griffith C. Pentecost, John H. Rose, George F. Sample, Elzy Swain, Wm. S. Smith, Henry B. Trout, Jacob Van Vatter, Henry Williams, Abner Ward. Escaped — Sergts. C. W. Smith and Edward W. Yaryan; Corporals Wallace Stanton and Cyrus D. Cross; privates Wm. Brown, Thos. C. Brown, Caspar C. Christ, Martin Egan, John Egan, Enoch Heavenridge, James S. Haynes, Watson Jones, Martin John, Jas. John, Geo. H. Moffitt, Charles Messer, Peter Morely, Asa Maloy, James Perkins, George Pierce, William Porter, James L. Bigger, Webster Snowden, John T. Schiff, John R. Sumter, Henry G. Van Rensellaer, George F. Ward, John W. Winchell, John H. Yaryan. Summary — Killed, one; supposed killed, one; wounded, eleven; missing, eleven; paroled prisoners, twenty-eight; escaped, twenty-nine; wounded and paroled, three; wounded and escaped, one; wounded and missing, one. To Laz Noble, Adjutant-General of Indiana: The undersigned would respectfully report the condition
The following additional in company B are paroled prisoners: privates Wm. Voerhees, John Miller, Wm. S. Rice, Jackson Arnold, W. D. Walker and Leo Lawrent; Corporals Geo. Shears, Andrew Golden and G. L. Richards; and privates H. G. Bramble, C. M. Bryant, Thos. Clark, S. G. Eggleston, F. W. La Compt, R. B. Mack, John Pinegan, Daniel Porter, Wm. Saddler, Wm. H. Simmons, Jubal Shaw. Co. E; Sergeant Joseph Cushman, Corporal Jason Wallace, musician Walter Huff, and privates Joseph Babbitt, James Perkins, Russell Huntley, Washington Cox, Curtis B. Knox, William Chamberlin, Addison Weaver, Reuben L. Kelly, Wm. Golden, Henry Couch, Co. F; Corporals Thomas H. Berry and George H. Wagoner, and privates Hiram Cole, Jas. Livingston, Wm. H. Nesbitt, Andrew Topper, Geo. Wells, Co. G; privates W. H. Delancy, Nels. Christianson, Jos. Haigh, John B. Smith, John Whitehead, Co. H; privates John K. Marmon, A. G. Rouse, Henry J. Lowe, Robert Smith, Wm. H. Bissell, John Cole, Wm. R. Purinton, Co. I; priv
mesR. D. ShepherdBoston299 135 ShipLondonSprague & James'sSprague & JamesAugustus NealSalem368 136 BrigSappho Repaired, at an expense equal to the value of one hundred tons.Sprague & James'sSprague & JamesR. D. ShepherdBoston100 137 ShipJames PerkinsGeorge Fuller'sGeorge FullerStephen GloverBoston370 1381828ShipBostonT. Magoun'sT. MagounLiverpool Packet Co.Boston428 139 ShipLiverpoolT. Magoun'sT. MagounLiverpool Packet Co.Boston429 1/2 140 ShipColiseumT. Magoun'sT. MagounBrown, Soule, rR. D. ShepherdBoston480 198 ShipNantasketJ. Stetson'sJ. StetsonSargent & BrooksBoston461 199 ShipFranconiaJ. Stetson'sJ. StetsonH. HallBoston510 200 ShipLuconiaT. Magoun'sCurtis & Co.D. C. BaconBoston550 2011835ShipLevantT. Magoun'sT. MagounPerkins & Co.Boston480 202 ShipMoloT. Magoun'sT. MagounMagoun & SonMedford492 203 ShipRubiconSprague & James'sSprague & JamesWilliam EagerBoston489 204 ShipElizabeth BruceSprague & James'sSprague & JamesWilliam EagerBoston586 205 SloopNoddleGeo
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 8: early professional life.—September, 1834, to December, 1837.—Age, 23-26. (search)
ds became Mrs. J. Lothrop Motley and Mrs. Stackpole. Hillard's kind words had opened the doors of some of these houses to Sumner. Oliver Wendell Holmes, then a young physician, visited most if not all of these families. There was no want of good talking at a dinner or supper where Hillard, Benjamin, Holmes, and Sumner were gathered. Sumner was accustomed to call at William Sullivan's and Judge William Prescott's, both friends of his father; at Jeremiah Mason's, Samuel Austin's, and Mrs. James Perkins's. He frequented the rooms of Mr. Alvord, his former teacher at Cambridge, who passed the winter of 1837 in Boston when serving as a member of the Legislature from Greenfield. Mr. Alvord was the chief promoter of the Personal Replevin statute, intended for the protection of persons claimed as fugitive slaves, and wrote an able report in its behalf Leg. Doe., House, 1837, No. 51. The latter used to say of him and Wendell Phillips, whom he called his boys, that the State and the co
by deeds dated Nov. 30, 1808. The bridge was completed in 1809, and roads were opened to Cambridge Common, to Medford, and elsewhere, to attract travel from the country to Boston over this avenue. To enable the proprietors to manage and dispose of their valuable real estate, which had hitherto remained apparently undivided and uninhabited (except by a single family in the old Phips farm-house), the General Court, by an Act approved March 3, 1810, incorporated Thomas Handasyde Perkins, James Perkins, William Payne, Ebenezer Francis, and Andrew Craigie, being tenants in common of lands at and near Lechmere Point, with their associates, as the Lechmere Point Corporation. Within the next two months the several proprietors conveyed their shares to the Corporation at the nominal price of five dollars. Streets and lots of suitable size were laid out; but the records indicate that the sales of land were few. The first deed of a house-lot, entered on record, is dated Aug. 20, 1810, and co
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 19: (search)
death of N. A. Haven.- Webster's Eulogy on Adams and Jefferson. memoir of Mr. Haven. visit to Washington. In 1823 Mr. Ticknor was chosen a Trustee of the Boston Athenaeum, and at one time was its Vice-President, and he became greatly interested in enlarging the scope and extending the usefulness of this excellent institution. An effort was made in 1826 to increase its funds, which was successful, chiefly through the liberality of Colonel Thomas H. Perkins, and of his brother, Mr. James Perkins. With this was combined a project to unite the various subscription and society libraries of the city in one organization with the Athenaeum; and of this plan Mr. Ticknor, with his liberal views of the needs of public culture, was one of the most earnest promoters. Unfortunately the difficulties in carrying out the entire scheme proved insurmountable. During the winter of 1826 Mr. Ticknor, in addition to his other occupations and pursuits, was much engaged in these efforts, in per
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
tice of Massachusetts, 9, 10 note, 11, 340. Parker, Mr., 146, 148. Parker, Mr., 407. Park Street, house in, 387-389. Parr, Dr., 50, 52, 53, 288, 289. Parry, Captain, 422. Parsons, Chief Justice, 396. Parsons, William, 331, 332. Pastoret, Count, 253, 255, 256. Pastoret, Countess, 255, 256. Patterson, Mr., 193 note. Peabody, Rev. W. O. B., 428 and note. Peel, Sir, Robert, 416, 417, 480. Pellico, Silvio, 450. Pepperell, 337, 385. Perkins, Colonel T. H., 328, 370. Perkins, James, 370. Perkins, Mrs. S. G., 13, 49, 68, 260, 328, 331. Perkins, S. G., 12, 13, 14, 49, 68. Perkins, S. H., 68 and note, 121. Peter, America Pinkney, 38. Peter, Britannia Wellington, 38. Peter, Columbia Washington, 38. Peter, Mrs. See Custis. Peter, Thomas, 38. Petrarch, letter on, 341-344. Philadelphia, visits, 15, 352. Phillips, Professor J., 422, 437 and note. Phillips, Thomas J., 443. Phillips, Willard, 391. Piacenza, visits, 162. Pichon, Baron, 132, 261.
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
. 416, 417, 480; death of, II. 268. Pelet de la Lozere, Ti. 131. Pellico, Silvio, I. 450, II. 38, 39, 40, 41. Pennsylvania, visits, II. 221, 222. Pentland, Mr., Ti. 346. Pepperell, I. 337, 385. Percival, Mr., it. 394, 395. Perkins, Colonel T II., I. 328, 370. Perkins, James, T. 370. Perkins, Mrs. S. G., 1.13, 49, 68, 260, 328, 331. Perkins, S. G., I. 12, 13, 14, 49, 68. Perkins, S. II., T. 68 and note, 121. Pertz, Dr., II. 313 and note, 332, 358, 359, 365. Pertz, MPerkins, James, T. 370. Perkins, Mrs. S. G., 1.13, 49, 68, 260, 328, 331. Perkins, S. G., I. 12, 13, 14, 49, 68. Perkins, S. II., T. 68 and note, 121. Pertz, Dr., II. 313 and note, 332, 358, 359, 365. Pertz, Mrs., II. 359, 365. Peter, America Pinkney, T. 38; Britannia Wellington, 38; Columbia Washington, 38; Thomas, 38. Peter, Mrs. See Custis. Peters, of Merton, II. 168. Petrarch, letter on, I. 341-344. Philadelphia, visits, T. 15, 352, II. 222. Phillips, Jonathan, II. 300. Phillips, Professor J., I. 422, 437 and note, II. 176. Phillips, Thomas J., I. 443, II. 155. Phillips, Willard, I. 391, II. 489. Piacenza, visits (Placentia), I. 162, II. 338. Picard, William, let
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 25., Old ships and ship-building days of Medford. (search)
nd cargo estimated at less than $40,000, and sometimes brought back from China cargoes valued at over $250,000. See Morison's Maritime History of Massachusetts, pp. 58-70. Solid Men of Boston (M. S.), pp. 70, 76. A number of Medford vessels were engaged in this trade. They were vessels of two to three hundred tons, permitting their use in the shallow bays of the northwest coast. Among them was the ship Eclipse, three hundred and forty-three tons, built for Thomas H. Perkins, James Perkins and James Lloyd in 1805 by T. Magoun. In 1807 Capt. Joseph O'Cain of Boston, chartered his ship Eclipse of Boston to the Russian-American Company, traded their furs at Canton, visited Nagasaki and Petropavlovsh, lost the vessel on the Aleutian islands, built another out of the wreck, and returned to trade once more. Morison. Maritime History of Massachusetts. Another Medford-built ship engaged in the Northwest fur trade was the brig Charon, two hundred and thirty-eight tons, b