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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 50 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson 4 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, chapter 5 (search)
rock or a squirrel in the boughs. I took the boys with me in my rambles and it was a happy time. Another sister of Stephen Perkins's, a woman of great personal attractions, kept house for her father, who lived near by, Mr. Samuel G. Perkins, young the test of English gardening or even of our modern methods, except perhaps in the fruit produced. I remember that Stephen Perkins once took an English visitor, newly arrived, to drive about the region, and he was quite ready to admire everything this party except Dana wore these gay garments and bore on their heads little round and visorless caps with tassels. Mr. Perkins, whose attire was always defiantly plain, regarded these vanities with ill-concealed disapproval, but took greatly to it was usually called, where she was to appear in a pretty creole dress made of madras handkerchiefs and brought by Stephen Perkins from the West Indies. She was a most attractive and popular person, and was enthusiastic about Brook Farm, where sh
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Chapter army life and camp drill (search)
l. He often gives the most comical pictures of himself, as of his vacating his tent in a storm to some men who had been thoroughly soaked, after which he strolled into the woods and sat down in a puddle, where he stayed disconsolately all the morning, like a damp hen. He describes a certain very fat officer who took refuge behind a tree in a skirmish, but lapped over painfully. He is always piquant, and very free of his criticisms on his superior officers, as might be expected. Stephen Perkins, a cousin and pupil as a boy of Mr. Higginson's, was killed at the battle of Cedar Mountain, August 9, 1862, going into the fight when almost too ill to stand. June 20 Charles Devens is here and I went to see him yesterday — he looks well, and moves with a cane, but Lieutenant Sargent says his wound has made no progress since it occurred, and so may take a good while; the ball cannot be found by the probe, which is perhaps no great matter, but the peritoneum is destroyed in one plac
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Index. (search)
al trip, 345, 346. Ossoli, Margaret Fuller, account of, 29, 30, 32. Ossoli, Count, 30. Oxford, England, Commemoration Day at, 291, 292. P Palfrey, Dr. J. G., 3. Palfrey sisters, description of, 1-3. Parker, Theodore, at graduation exercises, 4; compared with H. W. Beecher, 46, 47; eloquence of, 53; Higginson and, 53. 54; described, 94; fire at home of, 269. Peabody, Elizabeth, founder of the kindergarten, 240, 241. Pennsylvania, rural, and Quakers, 72-76. Perkins, Stephen, in Civil War, 167, 168. Perry, Nora, 264. Petersons, the, of Philadelphia, 250. Phelps, Elizabeth Stuart, 272. Phillips, Wendell, 82, 93; and Whittier, 9, 11; fire at home of, 269, 270. Phillips, Mrs., Wendell, 268, 269. Pierrepont, Edward, 291, 292. Pigeon Cove, Mass., described, 146-51. Pollock, Sir Frederick and Lady, 282, 283. Princeton, Mass., summer at, 144-46. Pumpellys, the, 328. Q Quakers, meetings of, 73-77, 235-37. Quincy, President, of Harvar
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1856. (search)
aced in these volumes. There hung around Stephen Perkins a peculiar atmosphere, not merely suggesthe other day: I could write nothing about Stephen Perkins, because the simplest things I could say nd Langdon Erving, Alexander Agassiz, and Stephen Perkins. Three of these young men, including Steof the crew, the peculiar imperturbability of Perkins's temperament greatly contributed. He had an country and in Europe, was a likeness of Stephen Perkins taken by Staigg about 1843. None who havtionwas natural and almost controlling in Stephen Perkins. Holding in his hands youth, beauty, culcorded in these volumes,—Abbott, Goodwin, and Perkins,—besides Savage, who died of his wounds. Of o battle almost too ill to stand, of whom Stephen Perkins was one. All our officers behaved nobly, was yet more consonant with the nature of Stephen Perkins than would have been any priestly or miliuniverse where nothing runs to waste. To Stephen Perkins, with his haughty humility, the accidents[3 more...]<
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1860. (search)
came out; five were killed, five wounded, four captured, three of whom are thought to be wounded., We hear to-day that the enemy have retired to some distance. If true, we may soon hear more of our missing. Goodwin, Cary, Choate, and Stephen Perkins were all quite ill, but would not stay away from the fight. Choate was the only one of the four not killed. Goodwin could n't keep up with the regiment; but I saw him toiling up the hill at some distance behind, with the assistance of his on his back with his head on a piece of wood. He looked calm and peaceful, as if he were merely sleeping; his face was beautiful, and I could have stood and looked at it a long while. Captain Williams we found next. Then Goodwin, Abbott, and Perkins. They had all probably been killed instantly, while Cary lived until two o'clock, P. M., of the next day. His First Sergeant was shot in the leg, and lay by his side all the time. He says he was very quiet; spoke little, and did n't seem to su
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1863. (search)
lve hours, dying on the 18th of September, 1863, in the twenty-second year of his age. His body was taken to Albany, where it was buried with military honors from St. Peter's Church, October 10, 1863. Winthrop Perkins Boynton. Second Lieutenant 55th Mass. Vols. (Infantry), July 8, 1863; first Lieutenant, November 21, 1863; Captain, November 23, 1864; killed at Honey Hill, S. C., November 30, 1864. the subject of this sketch was born in Boston, August 29, 1841. His parents were Perkins and Mary Anne (Simonds) Boynton. After two years spent at the Endicott School in Boston, he was sent to the public Latin School, of which Francis Gardner, Esq. was principal. There he remained for six years, finishing his course in 1858, and having then no intention of going to college. In school he was not remarkable for any great brilliancy or especial endowments, but for steady fidelity to his duty. In the early part of the year 1859, having conceived the idea of entering college,
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1865. (search)
rigor, an enthusiasm, that the commanding officer in vain tried to stimulate in some of the older officers, sparing neither himself nor his men. When Lieutenant Paine was officer of the guard, his influence was felt by the remotest sentinel on the outskirts of the town. His intelligence and discipline and indomitable resolution were so fully recognized by Colonel Macy, that he often spoke of promoting him. Besides Lieutenant Summerhays, who saw him as I have described, he was seen by Lieutenant Perkins during the action, his face, according to both, actually glowing with pleasure, as it used in Falmouth when he had the best of an argument. He used always to be asking me how an officer should bear himself in battle, when he should be behind and when before his men. I had always rather understated than overstated the amount of danger it was necessary to incur, because I had seen at Fredericksburg that he would be rather disposed to expose himself too much than otherwise. He certainl
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, Biographical Index. (search)
I. 150. Peirce, B., Prof., II. 208, 213;, 277, 281. Perkins, C. E., I. 287. Perkins, Catherine C., I. 370. PerkiPerkins, Catherine C., I. 370. Perkins, J. A., Lieut., Memoir, 370-878. Also, I. 40. Perkins, Sarah, I. 350. Perkins, S. G., Lieut., Memoir, I. 349-357. Perkins, J. A., Lieut., Memoir, 370-878. Also, I. 40. Perkins, Sarah, I. 350. Perkins, S. G., Lieut., Memoir, I. 349-357. Also, II 186, 455. Perkins, S. H., I. 349. Perkins, William, I. 370. Perkins W. F., Capt., II. 19. Perry, Com., IPerkins, Sarah, I. 350. Perkins, S. G., Lieut., Memoir, I. 349-357. Also, II 186, 455. Perkins, S. H., I. 349. Perkins, William, I. 370. Perkins W. F., Capt., II. 19. Perry, Com., I. 34; II. 2. Pettigru, J. G., Maj.-Gen. (Rebel service), I. 122, 231;; II. 308. Phelps, Francis, I. 189. Phillips, CPerkins, S. G., Lieut., Memoir, I. 349-357. Also, II 186, 455. Perkins, S. H., I. 349. Perkins, William, I. 370. Perkins W. F., Capt., II. 19. Perry, Com., I. 34; II. 2. Pettigru, J. G., Maj.-Gen. (Rebel service), I. 122, 231;; II. 308. Phelps, Francis, I. 189. Phillips, C. A., Capt, II. 235. Phillips, Wendell, I. 61. Pickett, G. E, Brig.-Gen. (Rebel service), I. 96; II. 454, 455;. PierPerkins, S. H., I. 349. Perkins, William, I. 370. Perkins W. F., Capt., II. 19. Perry, Com., I. 34; II. 2. Pettigru, J. G., Maj.-Gen. (Rebel service), I. 122, 231;; II. 308. Phelps, Francis, I. 189. Phillips, C. A., Capt, II. 235. Phillips, Wendell, I. 61. Pickett, G. E, Brig.-Gen. (Rebel service), I. 96; II. 454, 455;. Pierce, E. W., Col., I. 100. Plaisted, H. M., Col., II. 40. Pleasanton, A., Maj.-Gen., II. 70. Plumb, Rev. Mr., II. 231.Perkins, William, I. 370. Perkins W. F., Capt., II. 19. Perry, Com., I. 34; II. 2. Pettigru, J. G., Maj.-Gen. (Rebel service), I. 122, 231;; II. 308. Phelps, Francis, I. 189. Phillips, C. A., Capt, II. 235. Phillips, Wendell, I. 61. Pickett, G. E, Brig.-Gen. (Rebel service), I. 96; II. 454, 455;. Pierce, E. W., Col., I. 100. Plaisted, H. M., Col., II. 40. Pleasanton, A., Maj.-Gen., II. 70. Plumb, Rev. Mr., II. 231. Pope, John, Maj.-Gen , I. 26, 124;, 218, 244, 267, 425; II. 50, 94;, 128, 134, 169, 217, 259, 309. Porter, Fitz-John, Perkins W. F., Capt., II. 19. Perry, Com., I. 34; II. 2. Pettigru, J. G., Maj.-Gen. (Rebel service), I. 122, 231;; II. 308. Phelps, Francis, I. 189. Phillips, C. A., Capt, II. 235. Phillips, Wendell, I. 61. Pickett, G. E, Brig.-Gen. (Rebel service), I. 96; II. 454, 455;. Pierce, E. W., Col., I. 100. Plaisted, H. M., Col., II. 40. Pleasanton, A., Maj.-Gen., II. 70. Plumb, Rev. Mr., II. 231. Pope, John, Maj.-Gen , I. 26, 124;, 218, 244, 267, 425; II. 50, 94;, 128, 134, 169, 217, 259, 309. Porter, Fitz-John, Maj.-Gen., II. 64, 65;,167, 168, 169, 170, 217, 337, 338, 383. Porter, G. D., II. 304. Porter, Joshua, Dr., I. 90. P
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 6: (search)
ottingen this morning an hour of sadness and depression. At Cassel I stopped a few hours, and Prof. Welcker, who makes part of my journey with me, carried me to see Volkel,—a man who has made himself rather famous by a treatise on the Olympian Jupiter, and by a little volume, published 1808, on the plundering Greece of its works of art, just at the time Bonaparte had taken everything of this kind from Germany to Paris. . . . . On returning to our lodgings, I took leave of Everett and Stephen Perkins, who had accompanied me thus far, and in the evening came on a few English miles to an ordinary inn. Frankfort, March 29.—The first person I went to see this afternoon was Frederick von Schlegel, and never was I more disappointed in the external appearance of any man in my life; for, instead of finding one grown spare and dry with deep and wearisome study, I found before me a short, thick, little gentleman, with the ruddy, vulgar health of a full-fed father of the Church. On sittin