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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 32 6 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 3 1 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Samuel G. Perkins or search for Samuel G. Perkins in all documents.

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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Life of George Ticknor. (search)
uch frequented the families of Mr. Stephen Higginson, Mr. S. G. Perkins, Mr. Richard Sullivan, Mr. William Sullivan, Dr. John4) I set out on my journey, having the advantage of Mr. Samuel G. Perkins's company as far as Washington. He was one of the ersons, brusque. All men respected, many loved him. Mrs. Perkins was the daughter of Mr. Stephen Higginson, Senior, —an of Boston, and the head of the commercial house of which Mr. Perkins was a member. Mrs. Perkins was at one time very beautifMrs. Perkins was at one time very beautiful. Talleyrand, when I was in Paris in 1818, spoke to me of her as the most beautiful young person he had ever known, he ha of those days, there being no one in the coach with us, Mr. Perkins filled wholly with an account of the Revolution in St. Der gentlemen were. Mr. Otis was an intimate friend of Mr. Perkins, and he invited us both to take two rooms in their houseon, whom I had known at Dartmouth College, Hanover, took Mr. Perkins and myself to one of Prof. Silliman's Chemical Lectures.
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 2: (search)
had been printed for fifty years,—though he talked very freely of the natural impossibility that one generation should bind another to pay a public debt, and of the expediency of vesting all the legislative authority of a State in one branch, and the executive authority in another, and leaving them to govern it by joint discretion,—I considered such opinions simply as curious indicia of an extraordinary character. Georgetown, February 19, 1815. . . . . This evening, Mr. Sullivan, Colonel Perkins, and myself passed delightfully at Mr. Thomas Peter's, who married Miss Nellie Custis, granddaughter of Mrs. Washington, whom you see in the picture of The Washington Family. They are both of the Boston stamp in politics; and while Mr. Peter, as an extraordinary treat for an extraordinary occasion, regaled the delegates with a bottle of wine from General Washington's cellar, Mrs. Peter gave me an account of her grandfather's mode of life and intercourse with his family. He rose at six
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 3: (search)
1815. He had the happiness of the companionship of four of his most valued and intimate friends,—Mr. and Mrs. Samuel G. Perkins, Mr. Edward Everett, and Mr. Haven, of Portsmouth, N. H. Among other pMrs. Samuel G. Perkins, Mr. Edward Everett, and Mr. Haven, of Portsmouth, N. H. Among other passengers were two young sons of Mr. John Quincy Adams, on their way to join their father, then United States Minister at St. Petersburg. Mr. Ticknor wrote many pages during his voyage to his fathe Rotterdam, they went to the Hague, Leyden, Haarlem, Amsterdam, and Utrecht, where he parted from Mr. and Mrs. Perkins, and Mr. and Miss Haven; and with Mr. Everett and young Perkins, To be placedMrs. Perkins, and Mr. and Miss Haven; and with Mr. Everett and young Perkins, To be placed at school in Gottingen. went on his way to Gottingen. Of this parting, he says: It was not, indeed, like the bitterness of leaving home, but it was all else, and, indeed, in the sense of desolationPerkins, To be placed at school in Gottingen. went on his way to Gottingen. Of this parting, he says: It was not, indeed, like the bitterness of leaving home, but it was all else, and, indeed, in the sense of desolation, the same. For more than three months we had lived together as one family, . . . . and the affections which had long existed were ripened into the nearest intimacy. On the 13th of July, at Amste
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 13: (search)
e, he went as far east as Portland. I immediately suspected who he was, for I knew that M. de Talleyrand had been so far east, and no farther. I questioned him, therefore, about Boston. He seemed to have some recollection of it; said he knew a very intelligent family there, he did not remember their names, but there was a daughter in it whose name was Barbe [Barbara], one of the handsomest creatures he ever saw. I knew in an instant that it was Barbara Higginson, whom I had known as Mrs. S. G. Perkins quite intimately, when she was the mother of half a dozen children; with whom I had crossed the Atlantic in 1815, and who had often told me of her acquaintance with Talleyrand, and that he talked English with her who knew no French at all, when he refused to talk it in society generally. But he no longer cared anything about her or about anybody in Boston, except as a part of his own recollections and life. In this way we continued to talk for some time, until, at last, Mad. de Du
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 16: (search)
ces he furnished to Mr. Curtis for his Life of Webster. See that work, Vol. I. p. 192. Plymouth, Thursday Evening, December 21. . . . . We set off this morning at half past 8 precisely. Our own party consisted of Mr. and Mrs. I. P. Davis, Miss Russell, Frank Gray, Mr. and Mrs. Webster, Miss Stockton, Miss Mason, and myself; but in the course of the forenoon we overtook fifty or sixty persons more, most of them of our acquaintance, and at the dining-house found Colonel Perkins, Mrs. S. G. Perkins, and Susan. The dinner was very merry, . . . . in the afternoon ride Mr. Webster became extremely interested, and I enjoyed myself as much as anybody. At last we reached the hill that opened the Bay of Plymouth upon us, and it seemed in a moment as if I were at home, so familiar to me were the names and relations of everything I saw. It was like coming upon classic ground, where every object was a recollection and almost a history,—the point of land called the Governor's Farm, beca
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
ani, Prince, 166, 183. Herder, Baron von, 478. Herman, Professor, 108, 112. Hertzberg, Countess, 467. Heyne, Professor, 95, 105, 106. Higginson, Barbara. See Perkins, Mrs. S. G. Higginson, Stephen, 12, 13. Hill, Lord, Arthur, 442. Hillard, G. S., 326 note, 391 note. Hillhouse, Mr., 14. Hobhouse, (Sir) John Cam, 165. 428 and note. Peel, Sir, Robert, 416, 417, 480. Pellico, Silvio, 450. Pepperell, 337, 385. Perkins, Colonel T. H., 328, 370. Perkins, James, 370. Perkins, Mrs. S. G., 13, 49, 68, 260, 328, 331. Perkins, S. G., 12, 13, 14, 49, 68. Perkins, S. H., 68 and note, 121. Peter, America Pinkney, 38. Peter, Britannia WelliPerkins, S. G., 12, 13, 14, 49, 68. Perkins, S. H., 68 and note, 121. Peter, America Pinkney, 38. Peter, Britannia Wellington, 38. Peter, Columbia Washington, 38. Peter, Mrs. See Custis. Peter, Thomas, 38. Petrarch, letter on, 341-344. Philadelphia, visits, 15, 352. Phillips, Professor J., 422, 437 and note. Phillips, Thomas J., 443. Phillips, Willard, 391. Piacenza, visits, 162. Pichon, Baron, 132, 261. Pickering, John, 85, 39