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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 33: battles around Spottsylvania. (search)
ard, General Wilcox sent Thomas' and Scales' brigades to Lane's assistance and they arrived just as Lane's brigade had repulsed this body of the enemy, and they pursued it for a short distance. As soon as Mahone's division arrived from the left, Perrin's and Harris' brigades of that division and, subsequently, McGowan's brigade of Wilcox's division were sent to General Ewell's assistance, and were carried into action under his orders. Brigadier General Perrin was killed and Brigadier General MBrigadier General Perrin was killed and Brigadier General McGowan severely wounded, while gallantly leading their respective brigades into action; and all the brigades sent to Ewell's assistance suffered severely. Subsequently, on the same day, under orders from General Lee, Lane's brigade of Wilcox's division and Mahone's own brigade (under Colonel Weisiger) were thrown to the front, for the purpose of moving to the left, and attacking the flank of the column of the enemy which had broken Ewell's line, to relieve the pressure on him, and, if possi
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
dleton, General, 153, 162, 196, 198-204, 207, 209-10 Peninsular, 54, 57-58-59, 65 Penn, Colonel, 307, 309, 310 Penn, Major, 16, 203, 204 Pennsylvania, 46, 131, 159, 164, 236, 257, 259, 263, 264, 285-86-87, 306, 367, 401-02, 409, 414, 455 Perrin, General, 355 Perrin's Brigade, 355 Peters, Professor, Wm. E., 473, 474 Petersburg, Pa., 264 Petersburg, Va., 341, 359, 465-66, 474, 476 Petersburg, Western Virginia, 332-33, 335-338 Philadelphia, 255, 262, 386, 394 Pickett, GeneralPerrin's Brigade, 355 Peters, Professor, Wm. E., 473, 474 Petersburg, Pa., 264 Petersburg, Va., 341, 359, 465-66, 474, 476 Petersburg, Western Virginia, 332-33, 335-338 Philadelphia, 255, 262, 386, 394 Pickett, General, 163, 236, 275, 342, 360 Piedmont, 165, 370, 374-75-76, 382, 434 Piedmont Station, 11 Pisgah Church, 105, 285 Pittsylvania House, 26 Pitzer, Major A. L., 107, 187, 211, 220, 226-27, 377 Plank Road, 167, 169, 182, 203-212, 214, 216, 218, 220, 222-23, 225- 233, 317-18, 320, 322, 324, 344, 351-52 Pleasant Valley, 154 Plymouth, 340 Po River, 353-54-55, 357 Point Lookout, 385-86, 390 Pole Green Church, 361, 362 Poolsville, 394 Pope, General (U. S. A.), 40, 92, 102-
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 13: campaign in Virginia.-Bristol Station.-mine Run.-Wilderness. (search)
mparison, the heaviest of the four years of war. In the bitter struggle, trees large and small fell, cut down by bullets. Grant re-enforced Hancock by the Sixth Corps and by two of Warren's divisions, after failing to get Warren and Burnside in at other points. He then had over half of his army-over fifty thousand men-holding on to the advantage gained, while Lee, equally as determined, purposed to retake the position. Rodes's, Ramseur's, and Gordon's troops, three brigades under McGowan, Perrin, and Harris, and two battalions of artillery were put in, and all day the savage contest raged. Late in the night Lee drew back his troops on the new line. On the 11th he thought Grant was preparing for another move, and that night ordered most of the cannon out of the salient so as to be ready for a counter move, all of which a deserter from Johnson's line reported, and which may account for the assault which, though favored by a climatic condition, was courageously executed. Johnson
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
awaiting instructions from General Hill. I at once ordered forward Thomas' brigade and McGowan's, (then commanded by Col. Perrin,) to form an obtuse angle with Ramseur's brigade, which was the right of Rodes' first line, leaving an interval of onewhich was held by my skirmishers, when the night attack was abandoned, and Rodes' front line occupied the road-Thomas and Perrin extending the same with their commands, the right of Thomas' brigade resting a short distance from an orchard near a brick dwelling and barn. Next morning the skirmishing was very heavy in front of Thomas and Perrin, requiring, at times, whole regiments to be deployed to resist the enemy and drive them back, which was always most gallantly done. While this was goinhe division, and with Lowrance's brigade and my own, under command of Colonel Avery, moved back to the rear of Thomas and Perrin on the 4th. There was skirmishing at intervals that day, and at dark we commenced falling back in the direction of Fairf
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 13: invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania-operations before Petersburg and in the Shenandoah Valley. (search)
tion. The blow, given as usual by Hill, fell first on Miles, who promptly repelled the assailants. In a second attack they were again repulsed, with heavy loss. But Hill was determined to capture the works, and he ordered Heth's division to do so at all hazards. That commander then .concentrated a powerful artillery fire on the Nationals, and this was followed by a storming force, which, by desperate charges, succeeded in breaking Miles's line, and in capturing the batteries of McKnight, Perrin, and Sleeper. Hancock then ordered Gibbon to retake the works and guns; but his efforts to do so failed. Miles rallied a part of his broken column (Sixty-first New York), and by desperate fighting recovered some of the lost ground and McKnight's guns. At the same time Gibbon was assailed by some dismounted cavalry and driven, when the pursuit was checked by a flank fire. The Nationals retreated to a rear line, where the troops had been rallied, and when night fell Hancock withdrew from R
his losses up to this time at 39,791; to which some-thing must be added for the losses of Burnside's corps before it was formally incorporated with the Army of the Potomac. If we assume that half these fell in the Wilderness, our losses around Spottsylvania C. H. were scarcely less than 20,000 men. The Rebels, holding a ridge, generally fighting on the defensive and behind breastworks, had suffered considerably less, but still quite heavily. Among their officers killed were Gens. Daniels, Perrin, and J. M. Jones. In the Wilderness, our army had cut loose from its original base north of the Rapidan. It had since established a new one at Fredericksburg, to which its wounded were sent, and where they were met by officers, nurses, and other employes of the Sanitary and Christian Associations, with the amplest and most thoughtful provision for the mitigation of their sufferings. As it moved down toward Richmond, new bases were establish at Port Royal and then at White House; so that
her example of Lee's favorite rule to let his antagonist attack him on the further side of a stream. Taylor's Bridge could easily have been held by Lee for a much longer time, but its ready abandonment was part of the tactics by which Grant was being led into a military dilemma. In the picture the Federal soldiers confidently hold the captured redoubt, convinced that the possession of it meant that they had driven Lee to his last corner. severe, the killed including General Daniel and General Perrin, while Generals Walker, Ramseur, R. D. Johnston, and McGowan were severely wounded. In addition to the loss of these important commanders, Lee was further crippled in efficient commanders by the capture of Generals Edward Johnson and Steuart. The Union loss in high officers was light, excepting General Sedgwick on the 9th. General Webb was wounded, and Colonel Coon, of the Second Corps, was killed. Lee's forces had been handled with such consummate skill as to make them count one al
her example of Lee's favorite rule to let his antagonist attack him on the further side of a stream. Taylor's Bridge could easily have been held by Lee for a much longer time, but its ready abandonment was part of the tactics by which Grant was being led into a military dilemma. In the picture the Federal soldiers confidently hold the captured redoubt, convinced that the possession of it meant that they had driven Lee to his last corner. severe, the killed including General Daniel and General Perrin, while Generals Walker, Ramseur, R. D. Johnston, and McGowan were severely wounded. In addition to the loss of these important commanders, Lee was further crippled in efficient commanders by the capture of Generals Edward Johnson and Steuart. The Union loss in high officers was light, excepting General Sedgwick on the 9th. General Webb was wounded, and Colonel Coon, of the Second Corps, was killed. Lee's forces had been handled with such consummate skill as to make them count one al
art's Cav. Losses: Union, 40 killed, 150 wounded; Confed., 30 killed, 150 wounded. May 8-18, 1864: Spotsylvania, Fredericksburg Road, Laurel Hill, and Ny River, Va. Union, Army of the Potomac, Maj.-Gen. Meade; Confed., Army of Northern Virginia, Gen. R. E. Lee. Losses: Union, 2725 killed, 13,416 wounded, 2258 missing; Confed., 1000 killed, 5000 wounded, 3000 missing; Union, Maj.-Gen. Sedgwick and Brig.-Gens. Rice and Stevenson killed; Confed. Gens. Daniel and Perrin killed; Maj.-Gen. Ed. Johnson and Brig.-Gen. Steuart captured. May 9, 1864: Varnell's Station, Ga. Union, First Div. McCook's Cav.; Confed., Wheeler's Cav. Losses: Union, 4 killed, 25 wounded, 100 captured. May 9-10, 1864: swift Creek or Arrowfield Church, Va. Union, Tenth and Eighteenth Corps, Army of the James; Confed., Gen. Beauregard's command. Losses: Union, 90 killed, 400 wounded; Confed., 500 killed, wounded, and missing. May 9-10, 1864: Cloyd's Mo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General A. P. Hill's report of battle of Gettysburg. (search)
Archer, Pettigrew and Brokenbrough on the right, and Pender formed in his rear; Thomas on the left, and Lane, Scales and Perrin on the right. Pegram's and McIntosh's battalions of artillery were put in position on the crest of a hill overlooking ths division was then ordered forward — Thomas' brigade being retained in reserve — and the rout of the enemy was complete, Perrin's brigade taking position after position of the enemy, and driving him through the town of Gettysburg. The want of cavalclock; McLaw's about half-past 5. Soon after McLaws moved forward, General Anderson moved forward the brigades of Wilcox, Perrin and Wright in echelon. The charge of these three brigades was very gallantly made, and pressed on until Wilcox's right beof any success which might be gained by the assaulting column, or to support it if necessary; and to that end, Wilcox and Perrin were moved forward to eligible positions. The assault failed, and after almost gaining the enemy's works, our troops fel
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