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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 4 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 2 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 2 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 2 0 Browse Search
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Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
where for e)cerupa/rou to\ ei)/dwlon dia\ puro/s we should perhaps read e)cepu/rou to\ ei)/dwlon dia\ puro/s, “he burned the body to ashes with fire,” ei)/dwlon being apparently used in the sense of “dead body”). Strabo describes the tomb of Cillus or Cillas, as he calls him, as a great mound beside the sanctuary of Cillaean Apollo, but he places the grave and the sanctuary, not in Lesbos, but on the opposite mainland, in the territory of Adramyttium, though he says that there was a Cillaeum also in Lesbos. See Strab. 13.1.62-63. Professor C. Robert holds that the original version of the legend of Oenomaus and Hippodamia belonged to Lesbos and not to Olympia. See his Bild und Lied, p. 187 note. and whether it was that he loved her, as some say, or that he was warned by an oracle that he must die by the man that married her, no man got her to wife; for her father could not persuade her to cohab
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 9, chapter 114 (search)
The Greeks who had set out from Mykale for the Hellespont first anchored off LectumAt the western end of the bay of Adramyttium. having been stopped by contrary winds, and came from there to Abydos, where they found the bridges broken which they thought would still be in place; these were in fact the chief cause of their coming to the Hellespont. The Peloponnesians then who were with Leutychides decided to sail away to Hellas, but the Athenians, with Xanthippus their general, that they would remain there and attack the Chersonesus. So the rest sailed away, but the Athenians crossed over to the Chersonesus and laid siege to Sestus.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 9, chapter 115 (search)
Now when the Persians heard that the Greeks were at the Hellespont, they had come in from the neighboring towns and assembled at this same Sestus, seeing that it was the strongest walled place in that region. Among them there was a Persian named Oeobazus from Cardia, and he had carried the equipment of the bridges there. Sestus was heldAt the western end of the bay of Adramyttium. by the Aeolians of the country, but with him were Persians and a great multitude of their allies.
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Messenia, chapter 27 (search)
for their return begged the Messenians to grant protection to themselves. The Messenians returned to Peloponnese and recovered their own land two hundred and eighty-seven years after the capture of Eira, in the archonship of Dyscinetus at Athens and in the third year of the hundred and second Olympiad,B.C. 370 when Damon of Thurii was victorious for the second time. It was no short time for the Plataeans that they were in exile from their country, and for the Delians when they settled in Adramyttium after being expelled from their island by the Athenians. The Minyae, driven by the Thebans from Orchomenos after the battle of Leuctra, were restored to Boeotia by Philip the son of Amyntas, as were also the Plataeans. When Alexander had destroyed the city of the Thebans themselves, Cassander the son of Antipater rebuilt it after a few years. The exile of the Plataeans seems to have lasted the longest of those mentioned, but even this was not for more than two generations. But the wanderi
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 7, chapter 8 (search)
the army and were entertained by Xenophon, and they redeemed his horse, which he had sold at Lampsacus for fifty daries,—for they suspected that he had sold it for want of money, since they heard he was fond of the horse,—gave it back to him, and would not accept from him the price of it. From there they marched through the Troad and, crossing over Mount Ida, arrived first at Antandrus, and then, proceeding along the coast, reached the plain of Thebes. Making their way from there through Adramyttium and Certonus, they came to the plain of the Caicus and so reached Pergamus, in Mysia.Here Xenophon was entertained by Hellas, the wife of GongylusWhose ancestor (father?), according to Xen. Hell. 3.1.6, had been given four cities in this neighbourhood by Xerxes “because he espoused the Persian cause, being the only man among the Eretrians who did so, and was therefore banished.” cp. Xen. Anab. 2.1.3 and note. the Eretrian and mother of Gorgion and Gongylus. She told him that there was a