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Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 762 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 376 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 356 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 296 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 228 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 222 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Exordia (ed. Norman W. DeWitt, Norman J. DeWitt) 178 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 21-30 158 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 138 0 Browse Search
Andocides, Speeches 122 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20. You can also browse the collection for Athens (Greece) or search for Athens (Greece) in all documents.

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Demosthenes, Reply to Philip, section 1 (search)
It must now be clear to all of you, Athenians, that Philip never concluded a peace with you, but only postponed the war; for ever since he handed HalusA town in the south of Thessaly on the Pagasaean Gulf; not to be confused with Halonnesus. over to the Pharsalians, settled the Phocian question, and subdued the whole of Thrace, coining false excuses and inventing hollow pretexts, he has been all the time practically at war with Athens, though it is only now that he confesses it openly in the letter which he has sent.
Demosthenes, Reply to Philip, section 2 (search)
I shall, however, try to prove to you that you must not quail before his power nor offer a half-hearted resistance, but must enter the war with an unsparing provision of men, money, and ships—in a word, with all your resources. For first, men of Athens, you may reasonably expect that your mightiest allies and supporters will be those gods whose sanction he has flouted and whose name he has taken in vain through his unjust violation of the peace.
Demosthenes, Reply to Philip, section 8 (search)
Moreover, men of Athens, frequent reflection has taught me that not only do Philip's alliances end in suspicion and hostility, but also the various parts of his own kingdom are not united by such satisfactory and intimate ties as people imagine. For although in a general way the Macedonian power carries some weight and value as an auxiliary, yet by itself it is weak and, in face of such a stupendous task, even negligible;
Demosthenes, Reply to Philip, section 9 (search)
and Philip, by his wars and his campaigns and by all those activities to which his greatness might be attributed, has really made it a less trusty weapon to his own hand. For you must not imagine, men of Athens, that his subjects share his tastes; you must rather reflect that he wants glory, but they security. He cannot gain his end without danger; they, thinking of children, parents, and wives left at home, are not so eager to court ruin and danger every day to oblige him.
Demosthenes, Reply to Philip, section 13 (search)
This being so, how is it that they have so long remained loyal to him? Because, men of Athens, at present his prosperity overshadows all such shortcomings, for success has a strange power of obscuring and covering men's failings; but if he trips, all his weakness will be clearly revealed. For it is with the political as with the bodily constitution.
Demosthenes, Reply to Philip, section 16 (search)
stors, and is of an earlier date than the prosperity not only of Philip, but, roughly speaking, of all the kings that have ever reigned in Macedonia. Those kings actually paid tribute to Athens, but Athens never paid tribute to any power in the world. Moreover, we have a more secure claim than Philip upon the favour of heaven, in so far as our conduct has always been guided by greater regard for er date than the prosperity not only of Philip, but, roughly speaking, of all the kings that have ever reigned in Macedonia. Those kings actually paid tribute to Athens, but Athens never paid tribute to any power in the world. Moreover, we have a more secure claim than Philip upon the favour of heaven, in so far as our conduct has always been guided by greater regard for religion and for justice.
Demosthenes, Reply to Philip, section 17 (search)
Why, then, was he more successful than we in the late war? I will be frank with you, men of Athens. It is because he always takes a personal share in the hardships and dangers of the campaign, never neglects a chance, never wastes any season of the year; while we—for the truth must out—sit here idle; we are always hanging back and passing resolutions and haunting the market-place to learn the latest news. Yet what more startling news could there be than that a Macedonian should insult Athenians, daring to send us such a letter as you have heard read a moment ago?
Demosthenes, Reply to Philip, section 21 (search)
For none of you must assume that the same policy that weakened the power of Athens will suffice to restore and advance it, nor suppose that, if you are as half-hearted as before, others will be zealous in defence of your interests. Reflect, rather, what a disgrace it would be if your fathers faced many hardships and great dangers in fighting the Lacedaemonians,
Demosthenes, Philip, section 1 (search)
Philip to the Council and People of Athens, greeting. To the embassies that I have repeatedly dispatched to ensure the observance of our oaths and agreements you have paid no attention, so that I am forced to send you a statement of the matters in which I consider myself wronged. But you must not be surprised at the length of the letter, for I have many charges to prefer, and it is necessary to put them all clearly and frankly.
Demosthenes, Philip, section 9 (search)
And yet is it fair and right that, when it suits your convenience, you should call him an enemy of your state, but, when you want to bully me, the same man should be described as your fellow-citizen; and that on the death of Sitalces,Apparently a mistake. Sitalces, king of the Odrysae, was an ally, but not a citizen, of Athens, and was killed in battle against the Triballi in 424 (Thuc. 4.101). The description here exactly suits Cotys. on whom you did confer your citizenship, you should at once cultivate the friendship of his murderer, and pick a quarrel with us to shield Cersobleptes? And all the time you know perfectly well that of those who receive such honors at your hands not one cares a jot for your laws or your decre
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