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Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 26 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 22 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris (ed. Robert Potter) 20 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 18 0 Browse Search
Aeschylus, Agamemnon (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.) 4 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 4 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 4 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 2 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer). You can also browse the collection for Aulis or search for Aulis in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 3 document sections:

Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
O. Keller, Thiere des classischen Alterthums (Innsbruck, 1887), p. 1. The interpretation may perhaps be supported by an Assyrian bas-relief which represents a Herculean male figure carrying an ape on his head and leading another ape by a leash, the animals being apparently brought as tribute to a king. See O. Keller, op. cit., p. 11, fig. 2; Perrot et Chipiez, Histoire de l'Art dans l'Antiquité, ii.547, fig 254. and as for Syleus in Aulis, who compelled passing strangers to dig, Hercules killed him with his daughter Xenodoce, after burning the vines with the roots.Compare Diod. 4.31.7; Tzetzes, Chiliades ii.432ff.; Conon 17. Euripides wrote a satyric play on the subject. See TGF (Nauck 2nd ed.), pp. 575ff. The legend may be based on a custom practised by vine-dressers on passing strangers. See W. Mannhardt, Mythologische Forschungen, pp. 12, 53ff., who, for the rough jest
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
ff., ed. Dindorf; Cicero, De natura deorum iii.19.50. So, too, in Boeotia the two maiden daughters of Orion are said to have sacrificed themselves freely to deliver their country from a fatal pestilence or dearth, which according to an oracle of the Gortynian Apollo could be remedied only by the voluntary sacrifice of two virgins. See Ant. Lib. 25; Ov. Met. 13.685-699. The frequency of such legends, among which the traditional sacrifice of Iphigenia at Aulis may be included, suggests that formerly the Greeks used actually to sacrifice maidens in great emergencies, such as plagues and prolonged droughts, when ordinary sacrifices had proved ineffectual. But when this was of no avail, they inquired of the oracle how they could be delivered; and the god answered them that they should give Minos whatever satisfaction he might choose. So they sent to Minos and left it to him to claim satisfaction. And Minos ordered
Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
ed to victual the fleet and army assembling at Aulis. The conjecture is confirmed by the statement nsis, that before the Greek army set sail from Aulis, it had received a supply of corn, wine, and women. The armament mustered in Aulis. The men who went to the Trojan war wer of the Greek forces which mustered at Aulis, see Hom. Il. 2.494-759; Eur. IA ships, thirty. When the armament was in Aulis, after a sacrifice to Apollo, a serpentefore they again returned to Argos and came to Aulis. Having again assembled at AulisAulis after the aforesaid interval of eight years, they were in great perplexity about the voyagergos and arrived for the second time at Aulis, the fleet was windbound, and Calchas s king. After putting to sea from Aulis they touched at Tenedos. It was ruled bent before the Greek army assembled at Aulis; according to the Scholiast on Hom. I[1 more...]