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Sextus Propertius, Elegies (ed. Vincent Katz) 10 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 8 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 6 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 6 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 4 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington) 2 0 Browse Search
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M. Tullius Cicero, For Marcus Caelius (ed. C. D. Yonge), chapter 11 (search)
it was, however, a gentle one, and had more argument than ferocity in it; on which account it was listened to with the more attention. For while Publius Clodius, my friend, was allowing himself to be carried away by the greatest violence and impetuosity, and, being in a great state of excitement, was using the most severe language, and speaking at the top of his voice, though I had a high opinion of his eloquence, still I was not at all alarmed. For I had seen him conducting several trials without success. But I will reply to you first of all, O Balbus, with an entreaty to be allowed, without blame and without a charge of impiety to defend a man who never refuses an invitation to supper, who uses perfumes, and who often goes to Baiae.
M. Tullius Cicero, For Marcus Caelius (ed. C. D. Yonge), chapter 15 (search)
what you are doing, and what you are saying, and what you are charging us with, and what you are intending, and what you are seeking to achieve by this prosecution, you must give an intelligible and satisfactory account of your great familiarity, your intimate connection, your extraordinary union with him. The accusers talk to us about lusts, and loves, and adulteries, and Baiae, and doings on the sea-shore, and banquets, and revels, and songs, and music parties, and water parties; and intimate also that they do not mention all these things without your consent. And as for you, since, through some unbridled and headlong fury which I cannot comprehend, you have chosen these things to be brought into court, and dilated on at this trial, you must eith
M. Tullius Cicero, For Marcus Caelius (ed. C. D. Yonge), chapter 20 (search)
Does, then, that neighbourhood of his intimate nothing? nor the common report of men? Does not even Baiae itself speak pretty plainly? Indeed, they not only speak, but cry aloud; they proclaim that the lust of that one woman is so headlong, that she not only does not seek solitude, and darkness, and the usual concealments of wickedness, but even while behaving in the moshe way of life of a harlot, and has been accustomed to frequent the banquets of men with whom she has no relationship; if she does so in the city in country houses and in that most frequented place, Baiae, if in short she behaves in such a manner, not only by her gait, but by her style of dress, and by the people who are seen attending her, and not only by the eager glances of her eyes
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington), Book 3, Poem 4 (search)
bound, O'ertired, poor child, with play and sleep, With living green the stock-doves crown'd— A legend, nay, a miracle, By Acherontia's nestlings told, By all in Bantine glade that dwell, Or till the rich Forentan mould. “Bears, vipers, spared him as he lay, The sacred garland deck'd his hair, The myrtle blended with the bay: The child's inspired: the gods were there.” Your grace, sweet Muses, shields me still On Sabine heights, or lets me range Where cool Praeneste, Tibur's hill, Or liquid Baiae proffers change. Me to your springs, your dances true, Philippi bore not to the ground, Nor the doom'd tree in falling slew, Nor billowy Palinurus drown'd. Grant me your presence, blithe and fain Mad Bosporus shall my bark explore; My foot shall tread the sandy plain That glows beside Assyria's shore; 'Mid Briton tribes, the stranger's foe, And Spaniards, drunk with horses' blood, And quiver'd Scythians, will I go Unharm'd, and look on Tanais' flood. When Caesar's self in peaceful town The w<
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 732 (search)
Cetra is defined by Serv. and Isidorus (18. 12. 5) as a shield made wholly of leather. It seems to have been used by Africans, Spaniards, Achaeans and Britons: see passages in Lersch § 31. 4. Yates (Dict. A.) identifies it with the target of the Scotch Highlanders. Caligula (Suet. Calig. 19, quoted by Lersch) rode in state on a bridge built over the sea at Baiae, insignis quernea corona et cetra et gladio aureaque chlamyde. Falcati comminus enses seems to mean in close quarters their weapons are scimitars: the verb being supplied by a strong zeugma from laevas cetra tegit. Falcati enses = a(/rpai (Serv.).
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 710 (search)
Pal., Gud., and three other of Ribbeck's cursives have qualis, the reading before Wagn., who remarks that falis agrees better with sic v. 712. Ecboico Baiarum in litore like Euboicis Cumarum oris 6. 2 note, Baiae being near Cumae. Virg. draws a simile from the practice of his own time; not a usual thing with him. For these erections at Baiae comp. Hor. 2 Od. 18. 20 foll., 1 Ep. 1. 83 foll. Quondam in a simile G. 4. 261 note.
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams), Book 9, line 691 (search)
through his throat pierced deep into the breast; a gaping wound gushed blood; the hot shaft to his bosom clung. Then Erymas and Merops his strong hand laid low: Aphidnus next, then came the turn of Bitias, fiery-hearted, furious-eyed: but not by javelin,—such cannot fall by flying javelin,—the ponderous beam of a phalaric spear, with mighty roar, like thunderbolt upon him fell; such shock neither the bull's-hides of his double shield nor twofold corselet's golden scales could stay but all his towering frame in ruin fell. Earth groaned, and o'er him rang his ample shield. so crashes down from Baiae's storied shore a rock-built mole, whose mighty masonry, piled up with care, men cast into the sea; it trails its wreckage far, and fathoms down lies broken in the shallows, while the waves whirl every way, and showers of black sand are scattered on the air: with thunder-sound steep Prochyta is shaken, and that bed of cruel stone, Inarime, which lies heaped o'er Typhoeus by revenge of Jo
Sextus Propertius, Elegies (ed. Vincent Katz), Book 1, Addressed to Cynthia (search)
Addressed to Cynthia BAIAEnow Baia, then a fashionable resort on North shore of Bay of Naples, between Lucrine lake and promontory of Misenum. HERCULEAN SHORESHercules built causeway separating Lection to Lake Avernus, near Naples, another entrance to Hades. MISENUMsmall town on coast near Baiae. TEUTHRASmythological king in the region. While you linger in the middle of Baiae, Cynthia, wBaiae, Cynthia, where the path lies on Herculean shores, and marvel at seas subdued in the reign of Thesprotus, near the nobility of Misenum, does my memory ever bring a night of thought? Is there any place left for ppy among friends, whatever I will be, I will say, “Cynthia was the reason.” Just leave corrupt Baiae as soon as possible. Those shores will bring divorce to many, shores unfriendly to chaste girls.nthia was the reason.” Just leave corrupt Baiae as soon as possible. Those shores will bring divorce to many, shores unfriendly to chaste girls. Go to hell, waters of Baiae, you crime against
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan), BOOK II, CHAPTER VI: POZZOLANA (search)
CHAPTER VI: POZZOLANA 1. THERE is also a kind of powder which from natural causes produces astonishing results. It is found in the neighbourhood of Baiae and in the country belonging to the towns round about Mt. Vesuvius. This substance, when mixed with lime and rubble, not only lends strength to buildings of other kinds, but even when piers of it are constructed in the sea, they set hard under water. The reason for this seems to be that the soil on the slopes of the mountains in these neighbohere, and the moisture quickly hardens them so that they set into a mass which neither the waves nor the force of the water can dissolve. 2. That there is burning heat in these regions may be proved by the further fact that in the mountains near Baiae, which belongs to the Cumaeans, there are places excavated to serve as sweating-baths, where the intense heat that comes from far below bores its way through the earth, owing to the force of the fire, and passing up appears in these regions, thus
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Augustus (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 16 (search)
d by Pompey's cutting off the supply of corn by sea. But at last, having built a new fleet, and obtained twenty thousand manumitted slaves,The Romans employed slaves in their wars only in cases of great emergency, and with much reluctance. After the great slaughter at the battle of Cannae, eight thousand were bought and armed by the republic. Augustus was the first who manumitted them, and employed them as rowers in his gallies. who were given him for the oar, he formed the Julian harbour at Baiae, by letting the sea into the Lucrine and Avernian lakes; and having exercised his forces there during the whole winter, he defeated Pompey betwixt Mylae and Naulochus; although just as the engagement commenced, he suddenly fell into such a profound sleep, that his friends were obliged to wake him to give the signal. This, I suppose, gave occasion for Antony's reproach: " You were not able to take a clear view of the fleet, when drawn up in line of battle, but lay stupidly upon your back, gaz
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