hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Polybius, Histories 296 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 36 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 22 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden) 22 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 18 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 18 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 18 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 12 0 Browse Search
Sallust, The Jugurthine War (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.) 12 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 10 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Carthage (Tunisia) or search for Carthage (Tunisia) in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 5 document sections:

John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 286 (search)
Juno passes over Pachynus on her return from Argos to Carthage, as the gods were supposed to visit each of their favourite seats in the course of the year. See, among many other instances, 4. 143. Here Virg. was thinking of the return of Poseidon from the Ethiopians, when he sees Odysseus on the sea, Od. 5. 282 foll. Inachius of Argos 11. 286. Referre se, 2. 657: comp. v. 700 below. With the following speech comp. Juno's speech 1. 34 foll.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 293 (search)
Fatis contraria nostris fata Phrygum, because the destinies of the Trojans and of Rome were contrary to, and conflicted with, those of Argos and Carthage, which were the favourites of Juno. This is the chief cause of her hostility in the Aeneid. Comp. 1. 12—24. Fata contraria fatis of course implies the idea of a number of particular destinies acting like separate forces in the world, as opposed to that of one universal law. Comp. 9. 133 foll., and Venus' words 1. 239, fatis contraria fata rependens, where, though the fates spoken of are the prosperous and adverse fates of Troy, the contrast is really the same, as the adverse fates of Troy would be the prosperous fates of its enemies
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 1-15 (search)
Jupiter calls a council of gods, and exhorts them to compose their quarrel until the arrival of the time appointed for the assault of Carthage upon Rome.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 16-62 (search)
Venus prays Jupiter that whatever may be the fate of Aeneas, it may be permitted her to take Ascanius to herself, and that the Trojans, if they must give up Italy to Carthage, may be allowed at least to settle once more in their ruined fatherland.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 54 (search)
Inde, i. e. from Ascanius. Forb. comp. 1. 21, Progeniem sed enim Troiano a sanguine duci Audierat . . . Hinc populum late regem belloque potentem Venturum. Urbibus Tyriis a more general, perhaps a contemptuous expression for Carthage.