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Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 58 0 Browse Search
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Aristotle, Politics 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristotle, Politics. You can also browse the collection for Catana (Italy) or search for Catana (Italy) in all documents.

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Aristotle, Politics, Book 1, section 1252b (search)
barbarians,— implying that barbarian and slave are the same in nature. From these two partnerships then is first composed the household, and HesiodHes. WD 405. was right when he wrote First and foremost a house and a wife and an ox for the ploughing— for the ox serves instead of a servant for the poor. The partnership therefore that comes about in the course of nature for everyday purposes is the ‘house,’ the persons whom CharondasA law-giver of Catana in Sicily, 6th century B.C. or earlier. speaks of as ‘meal-tub-fellows’ and the Cretan EpimenidesA poet and prophet invited to Athens 596 B.C. to purify it of plague. as ‘manger-fellows.’The variant reading o(moka/pnous, ‘smoke-sharers,’ seems to mean ‘hearth-fellows.’ On the other hand the primary partnership made up of several households for the satisfaction of not mere daily needs is the village. The village accordin
Aristotle, Politics, Book 2, section 1274a (search)
all the offices from the notable and the wealthy, the Five-hundred-bushel classand the Teamsters and a third property-class called the Knighthood; while the fourth class, the Thetes, were admitted to no office.For Solon's classification of the citizens by the annual income of their estates see Aristot. Ath. Pol. 7. Laws were givenPerhaps 664 B.C. by Zaleucus to the EpizephyrianZephyrium, a promontory in S. Italy. Locrians and by CharondasSee 1252b 14. of Catana to his fellow-citizens and to the other Chalcidic citiesColonies from Chalcis in Euboea. on the coasts of Italy and Sicily. Some persons try to connect Zaleucus and Charondas together: they say that Onomacritus first arose as an able lawgiver, and that he was trained in Crete, being a Locrian and travelling there to practise the art of soothsaying, and Thales became his companion, and Lycurgus and Zaleucus were pupils of Thales, and Charondas of Zaleucus;