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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 18 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 16 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 14 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 14 0 Browse Search
Aeschines, Speeches 12 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 12 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 8 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 6 0 Browse Search
Dinarchus, Speeches 6 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer). You can also browse the collection for Chalcis (Greece) or search for Chalcis (Greece) in all documents.

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Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
ao (Chicago, 1913), pp. 94, 189 (as to the Philippine Islanders). I have cited many more instances in Spirits of the Corn and of the Wild, ii.148ff. The story of the brutality of Tydeus to Melanippus may contain a reminiscence of a similar custom. From the Scholiast on Hom. Il. v.126 we learn that the story was told by Pherecydes, whom Apollodorus may be following in the present passage. The grave of Melanippus was on the road from Thebes to Chalcis (Paus. 9.18.1), but Clisthenes, tyrant of Sicyon, “fetched Melanippus” (e)phga/geto to\n Mela/nippon ) to Sicyon and dedicated a precinct to him in the Prytaneum or town-hall; moreover, he transferred to Melanippus the sacrifices and festal honours which till then had been offered to Adrastus, the foe of Melanippus. See Hdt. 5.67. It is probable that Clisthenes, in “fetching Melanippus,” transferred the hero's bones
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
ut as Tiresias told them to send a herald to treat with the Argives, and themselves to take to flight, they did send a herald to the enemy, and, mounting their children and women on the wagons, themselves fled from the city. When they had come by night to the spring called Tilphussa, Tiresias drank of it and expired.See Paus. 9.33.1, who says that the grave of Tiresias was at the spring. But there was also a cenotaph of the seer on the road from Thebes to Chalcis (Paus. 9.18.4). Diod. 4.67.1 agrees with Pausanias and Apollodorus in placing the death of Tiresias at Mount Tilphusium, which was beside the spring Tilphussa, in the territory of Haliartus. After travelling far the Thebans built the city of Hestiaea and took up their abode there. But the Argives, on learning afterwards the flight of the Thebans, entered the city and collected the booty, and pulled down the walls. But they sent a portio