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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 34 0 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 32 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 10 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 10 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 10 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 4 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Metaphysics 4 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 2 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 2 0 Browse Search
Aristophanes, Acharnians (ed. Anonymous) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Pausanias, Description of Greece. You can also browse the collection for Croton (Italy) or search for Croton (Italy) in all documents.

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Pausanias, Description of Greece, Laconia, chapter 3 (search)
On the death of Alcamenes, Polydorus his son succeeded to the throne, and the Lacedaemonians sent colonies to Croton in Italy and to the Locri by the Western headland. The war called the Messenian reached its height in the reign of this king. As to the causes of the war, the Lacedaemonian version differs from the Messenian. The accounts given by the belligerents, and the manner in which this war ended, will be set forth later in my narrative. For the present I must state thus much; the chief leader of the Lacedaemonians in the first war against the Messenians was Theopompus the son of Nicander, a king of the other house. When the war against Messene had been fought to a finish, and Messenia was enslaved to the Lacedaemonians, Polydorus, who had a great reputation at Sparta and was very popular with the masses—for he never did a violent act or said an insulting word to anyone, while as a judge he was both upright and humane— his fame having by this time spread throughout Greece, was mur
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Elis 2, chapter 9 (search)
the same opinion about it as my predecessors, who hold that the chariot is an offering of the Gelon who became tyrant in Sicily. Now there is an inscription on the chariot that it was dedicated by Gelon of Gela, son of Deinomenes, and the date of the victory of this Gelon is the seventy-third Festival488 B.C.. But the Gelon who was tyrant of Sicily took possession of Syracuse when Hybrilides was archon at Athens, in the second year of the seventy-second Olympiad491 B.C., when Tisicrates of Croton won the foot-race. Plainly, therefore, he would have announced himself as of Syracuse, not Gela. The fact is that this Gelon must be a private person, of the same name as the tyrant, whose father had the same name as the tyrant's father. It was Glaucias of Aegina who made both the chariot and the portrait-statue of Gelon. At the Festival previous to this it is said that Cleomedes of Astypalaea killed Iccus of Epidaurus during a boxing-match. On being convicted by the umpires of foul play and