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Plato, Letters 268 0 Browse Search
Sallust, Conspiracy of Catiline (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.) 14 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 8 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 4 0 Browse Search
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Aristotle, Politics, Book 5, section 1312a (search)
n (if this story told by the narrators of legends is true—and if it did not happen with Sardanapallus, it might quite well be true of somebody else), and Dion attacked the younger DionysiusTyrant of Syracuse 367-356 and 346-343 B.C., cf. 1312a 34 ff. because he despised him, when he saw the citizens despising him anre must be an utter disregard of safety, if regard for safety is not to check the enterprise; they must always have present in their minds the opinion of Dion, although it is not easy for many men to have it; Dion marched with a small force against Dionysius, saying that his feeling was that, whatever point he Dion marched with a small force against Dionysius, saying that his feeling was that, whatever point he might be able to get to, it would be enough for him to have had that much share in the enterprise—for instance, if it should befall him to die as soon as he had just set foot in the country, that death would satisfy him.And one way in which tyranny is destroyed, as is each of the other forms of constitution
Aristotle, Politics, Book 5, section 1312b (search)
many years before this book was written. that of the family of DionysiusSee 1312a 4 n.—Gelo's, when Thrasybulus the brother of Hiero paid court to the son of Gelo and urged him into indulgences in order that he himself might rule, and the son's connections banded together a body of confederates in order that the tyranny might not be put down entirely but only Thrasybulus, but their confederates seizing the opportunity expelled them all; Dionysius was put down by Dion, his relative, who got the people on to his side and expelled him, but was afterwards killed. There are two causes that chiefly lead men to attack tyranny, hatred and contempt; the former, hatred,attaches to tyrants always, but it is their being despised that causes their downfall in many cases. A proof of this is that most of those that have won tyrannies have also kept their offices to the end, but those that have inherited them almost all lose them at once; for the
Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese), book 1, chapter 12 (search)
a chance of obtaining merciful consideration.In our relations with whom, almost = from whom. Another interpretation is: “In reference to whom there is a chance . . . consideration from others, meaning the judges” (Welldon). And those against whom we have a complaint, or with whom we have had a previous difference, as Callippus acted in the matter ofDionCallipus was a friend of Dion, who freed Syracuse from Dionysius the Younger. He afterwards accused Dion and contrived his murder. His excuse was that Dion knew what he intended to do, and would be likely to strike first, if he did not anticipate him.; for in such cases it seems almost an act of justice. And those who are going to be attacked by others, if we do not attack first, since it is no longer possible to deliberate; thus, Aenesidemus is said to have sent the prize in the game of cottabus to Gelon,Aenesidemus, tyrant of Leontini, being anticipat
Demosthenes, Philip, section 10 (search)
the younger Evagoras, Philip's history is inaccurate. He was expelled from Cyprus, and helped Artaxerxes to recover the island after the revolt, but he was never reinstated. His grandfather, of the same name, the friend and helper of Conon, was made an Athenian citizen. of Cyprus and to DionysiusThe younger, expelled by Dion in 356 and by Timoleon in 343. of Syracuse, to them and their descendants. Now, if you can persuade either of these peoples to restore their exiled tyrants, then you may apply to me for as much of Thrace as was ruled by Teres and Cersobleptes. But if you have not a word to say against those who overthrew Evagoras and Dionysius, but persist in harassing me, have I not a perfect right to defe
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 7, chapter 22 (search)
suffered shipwreck, for about three years preparations had been underway there. Triremes were anchored off Elaeus in the Chersonese; with these for their headquarters, all sorts of men in the army were compelled by whippings to dig a canal, coming by turns to the work; the inhabitants about Athos also dug. Bubares son of Megabazus and Artachaees son of Artaeus, both Persians, were the overseers of the workmen. Athos is a great and famous mountain, running out into the sea and inhabited by men. At the mountain's landward end it is in the form of a peninsula, and there is an isthmus about twelve stadia wide; here is a place of level ground or little hills, from the sea by Acanthus to the sea opposite Torone. On this isthmus which is at the end of Athos, there stands a Greek town, Sane; there are others situated seaward of Sane and landward of Athos, and the Persian now intended to make them into island and not mainland towns; they are Dion, Olophyxus, Acrothoum, Thyssus, and Cleonae.
Isaeus, Philoctemon, section 20 (search)
While she was still living in the tenement-house, she had relations with a freedman whose name was Dion, whom she declared to be the father of these young men; and Dion did, in fact, bring them up as his own children. Some time later Dion, having committed a misdemeanor and being afraid of the consequences, withdrew to Sicyon. The woman Alce was then installed by Euctemon to look after his tenement-house in the Cerameicus,The “Potters' Quarter” at Athens, partly inside and partly outside the om she declared to be the father of these young men; and Dion did, in fact, bring them up as his own children. Some time later Dion, having committed a misdemeanor and being afraid of the consequences, withdrew to Sicyon. The woman Alce was then installed by Euctemon to look after his tenement-house in the Cerameicus,The “Potters' Quarter” at Athens, partly inside and partly outside the walls near the Dipylon Gate (see Frazer's note on Paus. 1.2.4). near the postern gate, where wi
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Phocis and Ozolian Locri, chapter 9 (search)
hey are these: —Aracus of Lacedaemon, Erianthes a Boeotian . . . above Mimas, whence came Astycrates, Cephisocles, Hermophantus and Hicesius of Chios; Timarchus and Diagoras of Rhodes; Theodamus of Cnidus; Cimmerius of Ephesus and Aeantides of Miletus. These were made by Tisander, but the next were made by Alypus of Sicyon, namely:—Theopompus the Myndian, Cleomedes of Samos, the two Euboeans Aristocles of Carystus and Autonomus of Eretria, Aristophantus of Corinth, Apollodorus of Troezen, and Dion from Epidaurus in Argolis. Next to these come the Achaean Axionicus from Pellene, Theares of Hermion, Pyrrhias the Phocian, Comon of Megara, Agasimenes of Sicyon, Telycrates the Leucadian, Pythodotus of Corinth and Euantidas the Ambraciot; last come the Lacedaemonians Epicydidas and Eteonicus. These, they say, are works of Patrocles and Canachus. The Athenians refuse to confess that their defeat at Aegospotami was fairly inflicted, maintaining that they were betrayed by Tydeus and Adeimantu
Plato, Letters, Letter 2 (search)
9a, Plat. L. 7.349d. that you think that not only I myself should keep quiet but my friends also from doing or saying anything bad about you; and that “you except Dion only.”cf. Plat. L. 7.347c. Now your saying this, that Dion is excepted, implies that I have no control over my friends; for had I had this control over you and DiDion is excepted, implies that I have no control over my friends; for had I had this control over you and Dion, as well as the rest, more blessings would have come to us all and to the rest of the Greeks also, as I affirm. But as it is, my greatness consists in making myself follow my own instructions.This closely resemblesPlat. Laws 835c (withMO/NOSforME/GAS). However, I do not say this as though what Cratistolus and PolyxenusPolyxenuDion, as well as the rest, more blessings would have come to us all and to the rest of the Greeks also, as I affirm. But as it is, my greatness consists in making myself follow my own instructions.This closely resemblesPlat. Laws 835c (withMO/NOSforME/GAS). However, I do not say this as though what Cratistolus and PolyxenusPolyxenus was a Sophist and a disciple of Bryson of Megara, cf. Plat. L. 2.314dand Plat. L. 13.360c. Of Cratistolus nothing further is known. have told you is to be trusted; for it is said that one of these men declares that at OlympiaProbably the Olympic Festival of 364 B.C. (not 360 B.C. as in Plat. L. 7.350b); see the Prefatory Note
Plato, Letters, Letter 3 (search)
re most eager to do it, whereas now I am urging Dion to do precisely the same thing; and thus we arr god or chance, with your assistance, cast out Dion, and you were left alone. Do you suppose, thenenvy, and to use every endeavor to make you and Dion as friendly to each other as possible, separate come alone, and stated that you would send for Dion later on. On this account I did not go; and, to the effect that if I came I should find that Dion's affairs would all proceed as I desired, but tas the firm opinion of everyone, beginning with Dion, that it was my duty to make the voyage and notrs, that you should, in the first place, recall Dion on terms of friendship—which terms I mentioned;for the year, declaring that you would sell all Dion's property and send one half of the proceeds to. For when you had sold all the goods, without Dion's consent—though you had declared that without nd now that Theodotes and Heracleides, who were Dion's connections, were the subjects of accusations[10 more...]<
Plato, Letters, Letter 4 (search)
Plato to Dion of Syracuse wishes well-doing.It has been plain, I believe, all along that I took a keen interest in the operationsThis refers to Dion's military operations in Sicily in 357 B.C., and pDion's military operations in Sicily in 357 B.C., and perhaps later. that have been carried out, and that I was most anxious to see them finally completed. In this I was mainly prompted by my jealous regard for what is nobleThe reference is to Dion's plaDion's plans for the political reformation of Sicily; for I esteem it just that those who are truly virtuous, and who act accordingly, should achieve the reputation they deserve. Now for the present (God willes certain persons (who these are of course you know)The persons meant are Plato's own pupils and Dion's political supporters. to surpass the rest of mankind as if they were less than children.For thiides; but we, as I said, know nothing, although we hear many reports from the people here. And, Dion, do you also bear in mind that you are thought by some to be unduly wanting in affability; so do
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