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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 30 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 26 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 14 0 Browse Search
Hyperides, Speeches 10 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 21-30 8 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Letters (ed. Norman W. DeWitt, Norman J. DeWitt) 6 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 6 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 6 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 4 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Polybius, Histories. You can also browse the collection for Dodona (Greece) or search for Dodona (Greece) in all documents.

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Polybius, Histories, book 4, Philip Returns To the Peloponnese (search)
ith an even stronger passion for destruction than usual; for his object in everything he did was not so much to secure booty for himself, as to damage theDestroys Dodona. Epirotes. And having come to DodonaThe position of Dodona, long a subject of doubt, was settled by the discovery of the numerous inscriptions found about seven DodonaThe position of Dodona, long a subject of doubt, was settled by the discovery of the numerous inscriptions found about seven miles from Jannina, and published by Constantine Caraponos in 1878, Dodon et ses Ruines. See also Journal of Hellenic Studies, vol. i. p. 228. he burnt the colonnades, destroyed the sacred offerings, and even demolished the sacred building; so that we may say that the Aetolians had no regard for the laws of peace or war, but in tDodona, long a subject of doubt, was settled by the discovery of the numerous inscriptions found about seven miles from Jannina, and published by Constantine Caraponos in 1878, Dodon et ses Ruines. See also Journal of Hellenic Studies, vol. i. p. 228. he burnt the colonnades, destroyed the sacred offerings, and even demolished the sacred building; so that we may say that the Aetolians had no regard for the laws of peace or war, but in the one as well as in the other, acted in defiance of the customs and principles of mankind. After those, and other similar achievements, Dorimachus returned home. But the winter being now considerably advanced, and allPhilip starts again. idea of the king coming being given up owing to the time of the year, Philip suddenly started
Polybius, Histories, book 5, Plunder and Sacrilege At Thermus (search)
Plunder and Sacrilege At Thermus Up to this point everything was right and fair by the Sacrilege committed at Thermus. Was it justifiable? laws of war; but I do not know how to characterise their next proceedings. For remembering what the Aetolians had done at Dium4, 62. and Dodona,4, 67. they burnt the colonnades, and destroyed what were left of the dedicated offerings, some of which were of costly material, and had been elaborated with great skill and expense. And they were not content with destroying the roofs of these buildings with fire, they levelled them to their foundations; and threw down all the statues, which numbered no less than two thousand; and many of them they broke to pieces, sparing only those that were inscribed with the names or figures of gods. Such they did abstain from injuring. On the walls also they wrote the celebrated line composed by Samus, the son of Chrysogonus, a foster-brother of the king, whose genius was then beginning to manifest itself. The line
Polybius, Histories, book 5, Philip's Crime and Blunder (search)
, and retaliating upon the impious acts of the Aetolians by similar impieties, and "curing ill by ill"; and while he was always reproaching Scopas and Dorimachus with depravity and abandoned wickedness, on the grounds of their acts of impiety at Dodona and Dium, he imagined that, while emulating their crimes, he would leave quite a different impression of his character in the minds of those to whom he spoke. But the fact is, that whereas the taking and demolishing an enemy's forts, harbours, cid destroyed neither colonnades nor statutes, nor done injury to any of the sacred offerings. For my part I think it would have been one of the greatest goodness and humanity. For they would have had on their consciences their own acts at Dium and Dodona; and would have seen unmistakably that, whereas Philip was absolutely master of the situation, and could do what he chose, and would have been held fully justified as far as their deserts went in taking the severest measures, yet deliberately, fr
Polybius, Histories, book 9, Services of Macedonians To Greece (search)
s, by their victory over Ptolemy Ceraunus, than, thinking the rest of no account, Brennus promptly marched into the middle of Greece. And this would often have happened if the Macedonians had not been on our frontiers. "However, though I have much that I could say on the past, I think this is enough. Of all the actions of Philip, they have selected his destruction of the temple, to fasten the charge of impiety upon him. They did not add a word about their own outrage and crime, which they perpetrated in regard to the temples in Dium, and Dodona, and the sacred enclosures of the gods. The speaker should have mentioned this first. But anything you Aetolians have suffered you recount to these gentlemen with exaggeration: but the things you have inflicted unprovoked, though many times as numerous as the others, you pass over in silence; because you know full well that everybody lays the blame of acts of injustice and mischief on those who give the provocation by unjust actions themselves.