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Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 28 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 12 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 10 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Minor Works (ed. E. C. Marchant, G. W. Bowersock, tr. Constitution of the Athenians.) 4 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Eudemian Ethics 4 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 2 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Metaphysics 2 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Economics 2 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 2 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristotle, Eudemian Ethics. You can also browse the collection for Ephesos (Turkey) or search for Ephesos (Turkey) in all documents.

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Aristotle, Eudemian Ethics, Book 2, section 1223b (search)
that the same person will do the same action voluntarily and involuntarily at the same time.The same argument applies also in the case of passion;for there appear to be control and lack of control of passion as well as of desire and what is contrary to passion is painful and restraint is a matter of force, so that if what is forced is involuntary, what is in accordance with passion will always be voluntary. Even HeracleitusThe natural philosopher of Ephesus, fl. c. 513 B.C. His sentence ended O(/ TI GA\R A)\N XRH/|ZH| GI/NESQAI, YUXH=S W)NEI=TAI, Iamblichus, Protrepticus, p. 140. seems to have in view the strength of passion when he remarks that the checking of passion is painful; for 'It is difficult (he says) to do battle with passion, for it buys its wish at the price of life.' And if it is impossible to do the same act voluntarily and involuntarily at the same time and in respect of the sa
Aristotle, Eudemian Ethics, Book 7, section 1235a (search)
ly variant. One party thinks that the like is friend and the opposite foe— The less is rooted enemy to the more For ever, and begins the day of hate, Eur. Phoen. 539f. E)XQR=AS H(ME/RAS= E)/XQRAS, cf. DOU/LION H)=MAR= DOULEI/A, Paley.and moreover adversaries are separated in locality, whereas friendship seems to bring men together. The other party say that opposites are friends, and HeracleitusThe natural philosopher of Ephesus, fl. end of 6th cent. B.C. rebukes the poet who wrote— Would strife might perish out of heaven and earth, Hom. Il. 18.107 for, he says, there would be no harmony without high and low notes, and no animals without male and female, which are opposites.These, then, are two opinions about friendship, and being so widely separated they are too generali.e. being so absolutely opposite to one another, they are too sweep