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Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 28 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 12 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 10 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Minor Works (ed. E. C. Marchant, G. W. Bowersock, tr. Constitution of the Athenians.) 4 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Eudemian Ethics 4 0 Browse Search
Aristophanes, Clouds (ed. William James Hickie) 2 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 2 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Metaphysics 2 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Economics 2 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson). You can also browse the collection for Ephesos (Turkey) or search for Ephesos (Turkey) in all documents.

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Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 1, chapter 4 (search)
arched one stage, five parasangs, to the Pyramus river, the width of which was a stadium.The stadium = 582 1/2 English feet. From there he marched two stages, fifteen parasangs, to Issus, the last city in Cilicia, a place situated on the sea, and large and prosperous. There they remained three days; and the ships from PeloponnesusSee Xen. Anab. 1.2.21. arrived to meet Cyrus, thirty-five in number, with Pythagoras the Lacedaemonian as admiral in command of them. They had been guided from Ephesus to Issus by Tamos the Egyptian, who was at the head of another fleet of twenty-five ships belonging to Cyrus—these latter being the ships with which Tamos had besieged Miletus, at the time when it was friendly to Tissaphernes,See Xen. Anab. 1.1.7. and had supported Cyrus in his war upon Tissaphernes. Cheirisophus the Lacedaemonian also arrived with this fleet, coming in response to Cyrus' summons,See note on Xen. Anab. 1.2.21. These seven hundred hoplites under Cheirisophus had been sent by
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 2, chapter 2 (search)
iver and the hoplites outside.” Upon hearing these words the generals and captains went away and proceeded to do as Clearchus had directed. And thenceforth he commanded and they obeyed, not that they had chosen him, but because they saw that he alone possessed the wisdom which a commander should have, while the rest were without experience. Section 6 in the manuscript is as follows. This passage is regarded by edd. generally as an interpolation.[The length of the journey they had made from Ephesus, in Ionia, to the battlefield was ninety-three stages, five hundred and thirty-five parasangs, or sixteen thousand and fifty stadia; and the distance from the battlefield to Babylon was said to be three hundred and sixty stadia.] Afterwards, when darkness had come on, Miltocythes the Thracian, with the horsemen under his command, forty in number, and about three hundred Thracian foot-soldiers, deserted to the King. But Clearchus put himself at the head of the rest of the troops, following o
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 5, chapter 3 (search)
lympia to attend the games and returned to him his deposit. Upon receiving it Xenophon bought a plot of ground for the goddess in a place which Apollo's oracle appointed. As it chanced, there flowed through the plot a river named Selinus; and at Ephesus likewise a Selinus river flows past the temple of Artemis. In both streams, moreover, there are fish and mussels, while in the plot at Scillus there is hunting of all manner of beasts of the chase. Here Xenophon built an altar and a temple with hat even the draught animals which bring people to the festival have their feast also. Immediately surrounding the temple is a grove of cultivated trees, producing all sorts of dessert fruits in their season. The temple itself is like the one at Ephesus, although small as compared with great, and the image of the goddess, although cypress wood as compared with gold, is like the Ephesian image. Beside the temple stands a tablet with this inscription:The place is sacred to Artemis. He who holds i
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 6, chapter 1 (search)
question, it seemed best to him to consult the gods; and he accordingly brought two victims to the altar and proceeded to offer sacrifice to King Zeus, the very god that the oracle at Delphi had prescribed for him;cp. Xen. Anab. 3.1.5 ff. and it was likewise from this god, as he believed, that the dreamcp. Xen. Anab. 3.1.11 f. came which he had at the time when he took the first steps toward assuming a share in the charge of the army. Moreover, he recalled that when he was setting out from Ephesus to be introduced to Cyrus,cp. Xen. Anab. 3.1.8. an eagle screamed upon his right; it was sitting, however, and the soothsayer who was conducting him said that while the omen was one suited to the great rather than to an ordinary person, and while it betokened glory, it nevertheless portended suffering, for the reason that other birds are most apt to attack the eagle when it is sitting; still, he said, the omen did not betoken gain, for it is rather while the eagle is on the wing that it get