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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 190 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 110 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 42 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 14 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 14 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 12 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 8 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 8 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Metaphysics 6 0 Browse Search
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson). You can also browse the collection for Miletus (Turkey) or search for Miletus (Turkey) in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 4 document sections:

Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 1, chapter 1 (search)
heir cities. For, in fact, the Ionian cities had originally belonged to Tissaphernes, by gift of the King,See Introd. p. viii. but at that time all of them except Miletus had revolted and gone over to Cyrus. The people of Miletus also were planning to do the very same thing, namely, to go over to Cyrus, but Tissaphernes, finding ouMiletus also were planning to do the very same thing, namely, to go over to Cyrus, but Tissaphernes, finding out about it in time, put some of them to death and banished others. Cyrus thereupon took the exiles under his protection, collected an army, and laid siege to Miletus both by land and by sea, and endeavoured to restore the exiles to their city; and this, again, made him another pretext for gathering an army. Meanwhile he sent to theMiletus both by land and by sea, and endeavoured to restore the exiles to their city; and this, again, made him another pretext for gathering an army. Meanwhile he sent to the King and urged, on the ground that he was his brother, that these Ionian cities should be given to him instead of remaining under the rule of Tissaphernes, and his mother co-operated with him in this. The result was that the King failed to perceive the plot against himself, but believed that Cyrus was spending money on his troops
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 1, chapter 2 (search)
ias the Arcadian, who commanded for him the mercenary force in the cities,See Xen. Anab. 1.1.6. to come with his troops, leaving behind only so many as were necessary to garrison the citadels. He likewise summoned the troops which were besieging Miletus, and urged the Milesian exiles to take the field with him, promising them that, if he should successfully accomplish the object for which he was taking the field, he would not stop until he had restored them to their homes. And they gladly obeyes differed from ordinary light-armed troops (cp. gumnh=tas above) only in the fact that they carried a small, light shield, the pe/lph—whence their name. The last-named, and Socrates also, belonged to the force that had been engaged in besieging Miletus. All these came to Cyrus at Sardis. Meanwhile Tissaphernes had taken note of these proceedings and come to the conclusion that Cyrus' preparations were too extensive to be against the Pisidians; he accordingly made his way to the King as quickly
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 1, chapter 4 (search)
, to Issus, the last city in Cilicia, a place situated on the sea, and large and prosperous. There they remained three days; and the ships from PeloponnesusSee Xen. Anab. 1.2.21. arrived to meet Cyrus, thirty-five in number, with Pythagoras the Lacedaemonian as admiral in command of them. They had been guided from Ephesus to Issus by Tamos the Egyptian, who was at the head of another fleet of twenty-five ships belonging to Cyrus—these latter being the ships with which Tamos had besieged Miletus, at the time when it was friendly to Tissaphernes,See Xen. Anab. 1.1.7. and had supported Cyrus in his war upon Tissaphernes. Cheirisophus the Lacedaemonian also arrived with this fleet, coming in response to Cyrus' summons,See note on Xen. Anab. 1.2.21. These seven hundred hoplites under Cheirisophus had been sent by the Lacedaemonian authorities to aid Cyrus, and were the only troops in his army which stood in any official connection with any Greek state. together with seven hundred hopli
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 1, chapter 9 (search)
ircumstances to prove false to his word. It was for this reason, then, that the cities trusted him and put themselves under his protection,See Xen. Anab. 1.1.6 fin. and that individuals also trusted him; and if anyone had been an enemy, when Cyrus made a treaty with him he trusted that he would suffer no harm in violation of that treaty. Consequently, when he came to hostilities with Tissaphernes, all the cities of their own accord chose Cyrus rather than Tissaphernes, with the exception of Miletus;See Xen. Anab. 1.1.7 and Xen. Anab. 1.2.2. and the reason why the Milesians feared him was, that he would not prove false to the exiles from their city. For he showed repeatedly, by deed as well as by word, that he would never abandon them when once he had come to be their friend, not even if they should become still fewer in number and should meet with still worse misfortune. It was manifest also that whenever a man conferred any benefit upon Cyrus or did him any harm, he always strove to