hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 36 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 36 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 22 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Heracleidae (ed. David Kovacs) 22 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 18 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 16 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris (ed. Robert Potter) 10 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Phoenissae (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 8 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 8 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 6 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 246 results in 87 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
Tiryns, after fortifying also Midea and Mycenae.As to the fortification or foundation of Mycenae by Perseus, see Paus. 2.15.4, Paus. 2.16.3. And he had sons by Andromeda: beforat the kings of Persia are descended); and in Mycenae he had Alcaeus and Sthenelus and Heleus and Ms to the five sons born to Perseus in Mycenae, except that he calls one of them Ael son Eurystheus, who reigned also over Mycenae. For when Hercules was about to be bor then about to be born would reign over Mycenae, and Hera out of jealousy persuaded the Ilithff. When Electryon reigned over Mycenae, the sons of Pterelaus came with some uppose that Electryon was still reigning over Mycenae at the time of this expedition of the sons hem from Polyxenus and brought them to Mycenae. Wishing to avenge his sons' death, El while he himself seized the throne of Mycenae and Tiryns; and he entrusted Midea to
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
man, he sacrificed to Saviour Zeus and brought the lion to Mycenae. Amazed at his manhood, Eurystheus forbade him thenceforth n of Pelops the Elean. This Copreus had killed Iphitus and fled to Mycenae, where he was purified by Eurystheus and took up his abode. third labour he ordered him to bring the Cerynitian hind alive to Mycenae.Compare Pind. O. 3.28(50)ff.; Eur. Herc. 375ff.; Diod. 4.13sed the anger of the goddess and carried the beast alive to Mycenae. As a fourth labour he ordered him to bring the Erymanthianthe exhausted animal into deep snow, trapped it, and brought it to Mycenae. The fifth labour he laid on him was to carry out the dung d on him was to bring the mares of Diomedes the Thracian to Mycenae.As to the man-eating mares of Diomedes, see Diod. 4.15.3ffzetzes, Chiliades ii.320 sq. And having brought the belt to Mycenae he gave it to Eurystheus. As a tenth labour
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
2.5.11 (Antaeus), Apollod. 2.7.7 (Cycnus). Compare Apollod. E.2.5 (Oenomaus); note on Apollod. 1.7.8 (Evenus). After Eurystheus had perished, the Heraclids came to attack Peloponnese and they captured all the cities.For the first attempted invasion of the Peloponnese by the Heraclids or sons of Herakles, see Diod. 4.58.1-4. The invasion is commonly spoken of as a return, because, though their father Herakles had been born at Thebes in Boeotia, he regarded Mycenae and Tiryns, the kingdom of his forefathers, as his true home. The word (ka/qodos) here employed by Apollodorus is regularly applied by Greek writers to the return of exiles from banishment, and in particular to the return of the Heraclids. See, for example, Strab. 8.3.30, Strab. 8.4.1, Strab. 8.5.5, Strab. 8.6.10, Strab. 8.7.1, Strab. 8.8.5, Strab. 9.1.7, Strab. 10.2.6, Strab. 13.1.3, Strab. 14.2.6; Paus. 4.3.3; Paus. 5.6.3. T
Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
arrates the crimes of Atreus and Thyestes in agreement with Apollodorus and actually cites him as his authority, if, as seems nearly certain, we should read Apollodorus for Apollonius in his text (see above p. 164). The restoration of the passage to its present place in the text of Apollodorus is due to the German editor R. Wagner. Here after describing how Aegisthus had murdered Atreus and placed his own father Thyestes on the throne of Mycenae, Apollodorus tells us how the nurse of Atreus's two children, Agamemnon and Menelaus, saved the lives of her youthful charges by conveying them to Sicyon. The implied youthfulness of Agamemnon and Menelaus at the time of the death of their father Atreus is inconsistent with the narrative of Hyginus, Fab. 88, who tells how Atreus had sent his two sons abroad to find and arrest Thyestes. the nurse took Agamemnon and Menelaus to Polyphides,
Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
Helen for the evil he had spoken of her in a former poem; for having lost the sight of his eyes he ascribed the loss to the vengeance of the heroine, and sought to propitiate her by formally retracting all the scandals he had bruited about concerning her. See Plat. Phaedrus 243a-b; Plat. Rep. 9.586c; Isoc. 10.64; Paus. 3.19.13; Poetae Lyrici Graeci, ed. Th. Bergk, iii.980ff. When Menelaus was aware of the rape, he came to Agamemnon at Mycenae, and begged him to muster an army against Troy and to raise levies in Greece. And he, sending a herald to each of the kings, reminded them of the oaths which they had sworn,As to these oaths, see above, Apollod. 3.10.9. and warned them to look to the safety each of his own wife, saying that the affront had been offered equally to the whole of Greece. And while many were eager to join in the expedition, some repaired also to Ulysses in Ithaca. But h
Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
B.C.(Fasti Hellenici, i.134ff.). After Agamemnon had returned to Mycenae with Cassandra, he was murdered by Aegisthus and Clytaemnestra; for she while he was putting it on he was cut down, and Aegisthus reigned over Mycenae.As to the murder of Agamemnon, see Hom. Od. 3.193ff.; Hom. Od. 303-305; Hom. O on his father's murderers. The god gave him leave, so he departed secretly to Mycenae in company with Pylades, and killed both his mother and Aegisthus.This ginus, Fab. 119, Orestes was accused by Tyndareus before the people of Mycenae, but was suffered to retire into banishment for the sake of his fatherprivative). Such is a sample of Byzantine etymology. and having come to Mycenae, he united his sister Electra in marriage to Pylades,As to the marriage of Ele, with the note. And after wandering for eight years he came to port at Mycenae, and there found Orestes, who had avenged his father's murder. And havi<
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XI, Contents of the Eleventh Book of Diodorus (search)
t of the Acragantini, was defeated by the Syracusans and lost his overlordship (chap. 53). —How Themistocles, who had fled for safety to Xerxes and was put on trial for his life, was set at liberty (chaps. 54-59). —How the Athenians freed the Greek cities throughout Asia (chaps. 60-62). —On the earthquake that occurred in Laconia (chap. 63). —On the revolt of the Messenians and Helots against the Lacedaemonians (chaps. 63-64). —How the Argives razed Mycenae to the ground and made the city desolate (chap. 65). —How the Syracusans overthrew the royal line of Gelon (chaps. 67-68). —How Xerxes was slain by treachery and Artaxerxes became king (chap. 69). —On the revolt of the Egyptians against the Persians (chap. 71). —On the civil discords which took place among the Syracusans (chaps. 72-73). —How the Athenians defeated in war the Aeginetans and Corinthians (chaps. 78-79). —How the Phocians made
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XI, Chapter 65 (search)
no orders from the Argives; and they kept disputing with them also over the shrine of HeraThe famous Heraeum, situated at about the same distance from Mycenae and Argos in the hills south of the former. In it was later a celebrated statue of Hera, of gold and ivory, by Polycleitus. and claiming that they had In a word, the Argives were suspicious of the Mycenaeans, fearing lest, if they got any stronger, they might, on the strength of the ancient prestige of Mycenae, dispute the right of Argos to the leadership. Such, then, were the reasons for the bad blood between them; and from of old the Argives had ever be taken by storm through lack of support from outside. The Argives sold the Mycenaeans into slavery, dedicated a tenth part of them to the god, and razed Mycenae. So this city, which in ancient times had enjoyed such felicity, possessing great men and having to its credit memorable achievements, met with such an end,
Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs), line 1047 (search)
and report what has happened here to our friends there before Achilles' son is killed at the hands of his enemies? Enter by Eisodos B a messenger. Messenger Ah me! What an unhappy lot is mine, and what terrible news have I come bearing for you, old sir, and for my master's kin! Peleus Oh no! How my prophetic heart foretells disaster! Messenger To tell you my news, aged Peleus, your grandson is dead: such are the sword-thrusts he has received from the men of Delphi and the stranger from Mycenae. Peleus staggers backwards. Chorus Leader Oh, oh, what are you doing, old man? Do not fall! Hold yourself up! Peleus I am no more, I am destroyed! My speech has departed and the strength of the limbs that hold me up! Messenger If you wish to avenge yourself and your kin, hear what has happened and hold yourself erect. Peleus Ah fate, how you have overwhelmed me, unhappy man that I am, on the farthest edge of old age! But how did the only son of my only son perish? Though the news is pa
Euripides, Electra (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 167 (search)
The Chorus of Argive Country-Women enter. Chorus O Electra, daughter of Agamemnon, I have come to your rustic courtyard. A milk-drinker from Mycenae has come, he has come, a mountain walker; he reports that the Argives are proclaiming a sacrifice for the third day from now, and that all maidens are to go to Hera's temple. Electra My unhappy heart beats fast, friends, but not at adornment or gold; nor will I set up choruses with the maidens of Argos and beat my foot in the mazes of the dance. By tears I pass the night; tears are my unhappy care day by day. See if my filthy hair, and the rags of my dress, will be fit for a princess, a daughter of Agamemnon, or for Troy, once taken, which remembers my father.
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...