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Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 36 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 36 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 22 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Heracleidae (ed. David Kovacs) 22 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 18 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 16 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris (ed. Robert Potter) 10 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Phoenissae (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 8 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 8 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Euripides, Heracleidae (ed. David Kovacs). You can also browse the collection for Mycenae (Greece) or search for Mycenae (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 8 document sections:

Euripides, Heracleidae (ed. David Kovacs), line 73 (search)
confederacy of towns that existed before the unification of Attica under Theseus. Have you left the shore of Euboea and put in from beyond the water with sea-going oar? Iolaus It is no islander's life that I live. We have come to your land from Mycenae. Chorus What is the name the people of Mycenae call you? Iolaus You know, I'm sure, of Iolaus, the man who stood at Heracles' side. I am not unknown to fame. Chorus I have heard of you before. But whose are the young children you lead by the ha of Euboea and put in from beyond the water with sea-going oar? Iolaus It is no islander's life that I live. We have come to your land from Mycenae. Chorus What is the name the people of Mycenae call you? Iolaus You know, I'm sure, of Iolaus, the man who stood at Heracles' side. I am not unknown to fame. Chorus I have heard of you before. But whose are the young children you lead by the hand? Tell us. Iolaus They are Heracles' sons, strangers, who have come as suppliants to you and your city.
Euripides, Heracleidae (ed. David Kovacs), line 134 (search)
Herald I am an Argive, for that is what you ask me. But I want to tell you my purpose in coming and who it is that has sent me. Eurystheus, king of Mycenae, has sent me here to fetch these children. I have come here, stranger, with many just pleas both to carry out and to urge. I am an Argive myself, and I seek to take away these Argives who have run away from my own country, persons sentenced by the laws of that country to die. It is proper that we who are the city's inhabitants should pasmanhood, would be but poor fighters, if it is this prospect that raises your spirits, and there is a long stretch of time before then, when they might well be killed. But take my advice: give me nothing but merely allow me to take what is mine and thereby win Mycenae for an ally. Do not make the mistake you Athenians so often make, taking the weak for your friends when you might have chosen the strong. Chorus Who can decide a plea or judge a speech until he has heard plainly from both sides?
Euripides, Heracleidae (ed. David Kovacs), line 253 (search)
e a just cause and am victorious in my plea? Demophon And how is it just to abduct a suppliant? Herald Is that not a blot on my name but no harm to you? Demophon The disgrace is mine if I let you drag these children off. Herald Put them beyond your border and we will take them from there. Demophon You are a fool to think you can outwit the god. Herald This is the place, it seems, for the worthless to flee. Demophon The gods' sanctuaries are a common defense for all. Herald Perhaps Mycenae's people will not think so. Demophon Am I not then the master of things here? Herald Yes, if you are wise enough not to injure them. Demophon Be injured! I shall not defile the gods. Herald I am not eager you should have war with Argos. Demophon No more am I. But these I'll not let go. Herald I'll take them all the same for they are mine. Demophon Then you will find the trip to Argos hard. Herald I'll learn from the event if this is so. Demophon You touch them to your cost—your p
Euripides, Heracleidae (ed. David Kovacs), line 288 (search)
Chorus Now is the time to show forethought, before the Argive army approaches our borders. The war-strength of Mycenae is keen, but after these events more keen than ever. For this is the way with all heralds, to build up a tale twice as large as the truth. What grand story do you think he will tell his masters, how he suffered monstrous treatment and barely escaped with his life?
Euripides, Heracleidae (ed. David Kovacs), line 333 (search)
Demophon Your words are well spoken, old sir, and I am confident that the deeds of these children will match them: our favor to you will be remembered. I shall muster the citizens and marshall them so that we may meet the army of Mycenae with a large force: first I shall send scouts to spy on it so that it may not approach without my being aware (for at Argos every man is a swift-footed warrior), and then I shall gather the prophets and make sacrifice. But leave Zeus's altar and go with the children to the palace. There are men there who will take care of you, even if I am away. Go to the palace, old sir. Iolaus I will not leave the altar. We will stay here as suppliants and pray for the city's good fortune. But when she has escaped with honor from this struggle, then we will go to the palace. The gods we have as allies are not worse than those of the Argives, my lord. For Hera is their champion, Zeus's wife, but Athena is ours. This too is a source of good fortune for us, that
Euripides, Heracleidae (ed. David Kovacs), line 759 (search)
Chorus It is dreadful that a prosperous city like Mycenae, famed for its war-strength, should nurse a hatred against our land. But it is cowardly, o my city, if we are to hand over suppliant strangers at the behest of Argos. Zeus is my ally, I have no fear, Zeus is justly grateful to me: never shall I reveal the gods to be less good than mortals.
Euripides, Heracleidae (ed. David Kovacs), line 784 (search)
his four-horse chariot, took his stand in the middle of the space between the armies. Then he said, ‘Argive general, why can we not let this land and you will not harm to Mycenae by depriving it of its soldiery. Rather, join in single combat with me, and either, if you kill me, take away the children of Heracles, or, if you are killed, cede to me the honors and the house that are mine from my father.’ The army murmured and they released at once the propitious stream of blood from the necks of the cattle. Others mounted their chariots, while the foot-soldiers put flank against flank under the protection of their shields. The leader of the Athenians gave his men such exhortation as a brave man ought to give: ‘Fellow-citizens, now must a man protect the land that gave him birth and raised him up.’ But the enemy general for his part fervently urged his allies that they not consent to disgrace Argos and Mycenae<
Euripides, Heracleidae (ed. David Kovacs), line 928 (search)
Enter the Servant by Eisodos A with Eurystheus under guard. Servant My lady, though you see it yourself, still I will tell you: we have come bringing Eurystheus to you, a sight you had not hoped to see and a stroke of fortune he had not looked to feel. For he never supposed that he would fall into your hands when he set off from Mycenae with his throng of toiling soldiers, thinking thoughts too high for justice, to sack the city of Athena. But the god made the outcome the reverse of his expectations. Hyllus and brave Iolaus were erecting a victory statue in honor of Zeus, God of the Rout. But they instructed me to bring this man to you, intending to give pleasure to your heart. For there is no pleasanter sight than to see one's enemy fallen after prosperity into misfortune. Alcmene Have you come, hateful creature? Has Justice caught you at long last? Come, first turn your head towards me and steel yourself to look your enemies in the face: you are the ruled now, no longer the