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Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 36 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 36 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 22 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Heracleidae (ed. David Kovacs) 22 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 18 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 16 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris (ed. Robert Potter) 10 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Phoenissae (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 8 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 8 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War. You can also browse the collection for Mycenae (Greece) or search for Mycenae (Greece) in all documents.

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Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War, Book 1, chapter 9 (search)
clids. Atreus was his mother's brother; and to the hands of his relation, who had left his father on account of the death of Chrysippus, Eurystheus, when he set out on his expedition, had committed Mycenae and the government. As time went on and Eurystheus did not return, Atreus complied with the wishes of the Mycenaeans, who were influenced by fear of the Heraclids,—besides, his power seemed considerable, and he had not neglected to court the favour of the populace,—and assumed the sceptre of Mycenae and the rest of the dominions of Eurystheus. And so the power of the descendants of Pelops came to be greater than that of the descendants of Perseus. To all this Agamemnon succeeded. He had also a navy far stronger than his contemporaries, so that, in my opinion, fear was
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War, Book 1, chapter 10 (search)
Now Mycenae may have been a small place, and many of the towns of that age may appear comparatively insignificant, but no exact observer would therefore feel justified in rejecting the estimate given by the poets and by tradition of the magnitude of the armament. For I suppose if Lacedaemon were to become desolate, and the temples and the foundations of the public buildings were left, that as time went on there would be a strong disposition with posterity to refuse to accept her fame as a true exponent of her power. And yet they occupy two-fifths of Peloponnese and lead the whole, not to speak of their numerous allies without. Still, as the city is neither built in a compact form nor adorned with magnificen