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Antiphon, Speeches (ed. K. J. Maidment) 36 0 Browse Search
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Diodorus Siculus, Library 16 0 Browse Search
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Plato, Hippias Major, Hippias Minor, Ion, Menexenus, Cleitophon, Timaeus, Critias, Minos, Epinomis 4 0 Browse Search
Plato, Euthydemus, Protagoras, Gorgias, Meno 4 0 Browse Search
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Antiphon, On the murder of Herodes (ed. K. J. Maidment), Witnesses (search)
I sailed from Mytilene, gentlemen, as a passenger on the same boat as this Herodes whom, we are told, I murdered. We were bound for Aenus, I to visit my father, who happened to be there just then, and Herodes to release some slavesProbably prisoners of war who were being ransomed by their relatives. It is surprising that no attempt is made to throw suspicion on one of these Thracians, as a motive would have been easy to find. to certain Thracians. The slaves whom he was to release were also passengers, as were the Thracians who were to purchase their freedom. I will produce witnesses to satisfy you of this. Witnesses
Antiphon, On the murder of Herodes (ed. K. J. Maidment), section 23 (search)
After crossing into the other boat, we fell to drinking. Now whereas it is established that Herodes quitted the boat and did not board it again, I did not leave the boat at all that night. Next day, when Herodes was missing, I joined in the search as anxiously as any; if anyone considered the matter serious, I did. Not only was I responsible for the dispatch of a messenger to Mytilene, that is to say, it was upon my suggestion that it was decided to send one,
Antiphon, On the murder of Herodes (ed. K. J. Maidment), Witnesses (search)
but when none of the passengers or the personal companions of Herodes volunteered to go, I offered to send my own attendant; and I hardly imagine that I was deliberately proposing to send someone who would inform against me. Finally, when the search had failed to reveal any trace of Herodes either at Mytilene or anywhere else and, with the return of fair sailing-weather, the rest of the boats began standing out to sea, I likewise took my departure. I will produce witnesses to prove these statements to you. Witnesses
Antiphon, On the murder of Herodes (ed. K. J. Maidment), section 29 (search)
certain. Herodes and Euxitheus took shelter for the night on a boat bound for Mytilene. After the storm was over, the passengers returned to their own vessel. had reached Mytilene, the prosecution first of all went on board and conducted a search. On finding the bloodstains,to\ ai(=ma(cf. tw=n proba/twn), because it had alreadyeltered form the rain, and that after the storm they continued their voyage to Mytilene, where the relatives of Herodes immediately came aboard and took them into cusheus parted from the men after the storm, he proceeding the Aenus, and they to Mytilene. 42, however, offers a difficulty. Euxitheus there says with reference to thment which on the face of it should mean that he travelled with Euxitheus from Mytilene to Aenus. There seems to be only one explanation of the inconsistency. Euxit that the man was actually in the pay of Euxitheus. Can he have been the a)ko/louqos of 24, sent back to Mytilene by E. and there detained by the family of Herod
Antiphon, On the murder of Herodes (ed. K. J. Maidment), section 76 (search)
Before the revolt of MytileneMytilene had revolted from Athens some ten years previously, in 428. my father gave visible proof of his devotion to your interests. When, however, the city as a whole was so ill-advised as to commit the blunder of revolting,Although the th=s u(mete/ras gnw/mhs of the Mss., if retained and taken with h(/marte, would give the sense “failed in what you expected of them,” an expression for which there are parallels, sunecamartei=n REQUIRES h(/marte alone to balance it,Mytilene had revolted from Athens some ten years previously, in 428. my father gave visible proof of his devotion to your interests. When, however, the city as a whole was so ill-advised as to commit the blunder of revolting,Although the th=s u(mete/ras gnw/mhs of the Mss., if retained and taken with h(/marte, would give the sense “failed in what you expected of them,” an expression for which there are parallels, sunecamartei=n REQUIRES h(/marte alone to balance it, and the repetition of gnw/mh lines later is harsh in the extreme. he was forced to join the city as a whole in that blunder. Not but what even then his feelings towards you remained unchanged: although he could no longer display his devotion in the old way. It was not easy for him to leave the city, as the ties which bound him, his children, and his property, were strong ones; nor yet could he set it at defiance as long as he remained
Antiphon, On the murder of Herodes (ed. K. J. Maidment), section 77 (search)
But from the moment that you punished the authors of the revolt—of whom my father was not found to be one—and granted the other citizens of Mytilene an amnesty which allowed them to continue living on their own land,See Thuc. 3.50. The walls of Mytilene were rased, her fleet taken from her, and the entire island, except for MethyMytilene were rased, her fleet taken from her, and the entire island, except for Methymna, divided among Athenian cleruchs. These drew a fixed rent from the inhabitants, who continued to work the land. he has not been guilty of a single fault, of a single lapse from duty. He has failed neither the city of Athens nor that of Mytilene, when a public service was demanded of him; he regularly furnishes choruses, andMytilene, when a public service was demanded of him; he regularly furnishes choruses, and always pays the imposts.The choruses mentioned were of course local, and performed at the Mytilenean festivals. The “services to Athens” amount to nothing more than the payment of te/lh(?harbor-dues). Professor Wade-Gery suggests to me that the ei)kosth/ may be meant, a 5 per cent impost which replaced the tribute early in
Antiphon, On the murder of Herodes (ed. K. J. Maidment), section 78 (search)
If Aenus is his favorite place of resort, that fact does not mean that he is evading any of his obligations towards Athens,Or possibly Mytilene. or that he has become the citizen of another city, like those others, some of whom I see crossing to the mainland and settling among your enemies, while the rest actually litigate with yoly commercial in character, between the citizens of different states. Fragments of two such treaties have survived : Athens-Phaseils (I.G.i2 16 ff.) and Athens-Mytilene (I.G. i2 60 ff.); and in the first of these there is a reference to a third, Athens-Chios. It is quite certain, however, that agreements of this sort did not e such a solution is that kai\ di/kas a)po\ sumbo/lwn u(mi=n dikazome/nous in l. 6 becomes otiose, as it is known that su/mbola already existed between Athens and Mytilene. Better is Reiskes's tou\s de\. We then have a contrast between Euxitheus' father, who is a loyal citizen of Mytilene under Athenian rule, and other Mytilenea
Antiphon, On the murder of Herodes (ed. K. J. Maidment), section 79 (search)
The act which my father joined his whole city in committing, which he committed not from choice but under compulsion, affords no just ground for punishing him individually. The mistake then made will live in the memory of every citizen of Mytilene. They exchanged great prosperity for great misery, and saw their country pass into the possession of others. Nor again must you be influenced by the distorted account of my father's conduct as an individual with which you have been presented. Nothing but money is at the bottom of this elaborate attack upon him and myself; and unfortunately there are many circumstances which favor those who seek to lay hands on the goods of others; my father is too old to help me: and I am far too young to be able to avenge myself as I should.
Aristotle, Metaphysics, Book 2, section 993b (search)
ence in respect of those things which are by nature most obvious.It is only fair to be grateful not only to those whose views we can share but also to those who have expressed rather superficial opinions. They too have contributed something; by their preliminary work they have formed our mental experience.If there had been no Timotheus,Of Miletus, 446 (?)—357 B.C. we should not possess much of our music; and if there had been no Phrynis,Of Mytilene; he is referred to as still alive in Aristoph. Cl. 971. Both Phrynis and Timotheus are criticized in the fragment of Pherecrates Chirontranslated by Rogers in the appendix to his ed. of the Clouds. there would have been no Timotheus. It is just the same in the case of those who have theorized about reality: we have derived certain views from some of them, and they in turn were indebted to others.Moreover, philosophy is rightly calleda knowledge o
Demosthenes, Exordia (ed. Norman W. DeWitt, Norman J. DeWitt), exordium 37, section 2 (search)
mself, but if you shall reject his views, that he may have done with the matter and neither annoy you nor tire himself out. This, then, will be my first statement: It is my opinion that the democratic party in Mytilene has been wronged and that it is your duty to obtain justice for them.The democracy was overthrown in Mytilene after the Social War in 355 B.C.: Dem. 13.8 and Dem. 15.19. For obtaining this justice s, then, will be my first statement: It is my opinion that the democratic party in Mytilene has been wronged and that it is your duty to obtain justice for them.The democracy was overthrown in Mytilene after the Social War in 355 B.C.: Dem. 13.8 and Dem. 15.19. For obtaining this justice I have a plan to propose when once I have demonstrated that they have been wronged and that it is your duty to go to their aid.
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