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Aristotle, Politics 4 0 Browse Search
Aristophanes, Wasps (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.) 4 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese) 4 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 4 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 2 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 51-61 2 0 Browse Search
Sophocles, Oedipus Tyrannus (ed. Sir Richard Jebb) 2 0 Browse Search
Plato, Parmenides, Philebus, Symposium, Phaedrus 2 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Hippolytus (ed. David Kovacs) 2 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 2 0 Browse Search
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Bacchylides, Epinicians (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Ode 3 For Hieron of Syracuse Chariot-Race at Olympia 468 B. C. (search)
Ode 3 For Hieron of Syracuse Chariot-Race at Olympia 468 B. C. Clio, giver of sweet gifts, sing the praises of the mistress of most fertile Sicily, Demeter, and of her violet-garlanded daughter, and of Hieron's swift horses, racers at Olympia; for they sped with majestic Victory and with Aglaia by the wide-whirling Alpheus, where they made the son of Deinomenes a prosperous man, a victor winning garlands. And the people shouted, “Ah! thrice-blesseOlympia; for they sped with majestic Victory and with Aglaia by the wide-whirling Alpheus, where they made the son of Deinomenes a prosperous man, a victor winning garlands. And the people shouted, “Ah! thrice-blessed man! Zeus has granted him the honor of ruling most widely over the Greeks, and he knows not to hide his towered wealth under black-cloaked darkness.” The temples teem with cattle-sacrificing festivities; the streets teem with hospitality. Gold flashes and glitters, the gold of tall ornate tripods standing before the temple, where the Delphians administer the great precinct of Phoebus beside the Castalian stream. A man should honor the god, for that is the greatest prosperity. <
Bacchylides, Epinicians (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Ode 5 For Hieron of Syracuse Single-horse victory at Olympia 476 B. C. (search)
Ode 5 For Hieron of Syracuse Single-horse victory at Olympia 476 B. C. Fortunate in your fate, commander of the Syracusans, riders of whirling horses: you, if any man on earth today, will rightly understand this honor, sweet gift of the violet-garlanded Muses. Now, calm your righteous mind; rest it from cares, and consider: a hymn, woven with the help of the deep-waisted Graces, is sent from the holy islandCeos, off the coast of Attica; homeland of Bacchylides and his uncle, the poet Simonides.to your glorious city by your guest-friend, the brilliant servant of Ourania with her golden headband. He wants to pour forth his voice from his heart to praise Hieron. High above, slicing the deep air with his swift golden wings, the eagle, messenger of loud-thundering, wide-ruling Zeus, trusts boldly in his powerful strength, and thin-voiced birds crouch in fear. The peaks of the great earth do not restrain him, nor the rough, choppy waves of the un
Bacchylides, Epinicians (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Ode 6 For Lachon of Ceos [Boys'] Foot Race at Olympia 452 B. C. (search)
Ode 6 For Lachon of Ceos [Boys'] Foot Race at Olympia 452 B. C. Lachon has won from greatest Zeus the best glory with his feet by the streams of the Alpheus [the victories] through which before Ceos rich in vines has been sung at Olympia as victorious in boxing and the foot race, by young men, luxuriant with garlands in their hair. And now by the will of Victory, the hymn of Ourania, ruler of song, honors you, wind-footed son of Aristomenes, in songs b Lachon has won from greatest Zeus the best glory with his feet by the streams of the Alpheus [the victories] through which before Ceos rich in vines has been sung at Olympia as victorious in boxing and the foot race, by young men, luxuriant with garlands in their hair. And now by the will of Victory, the hymn of Ourania, ruler of song, honors you, wind-footed son of Aristomenes, in songs before your house, since by your triumph in the foot race you brought glory to Ceos.
Bacchylides, Epinicians (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Ode 7 For Lachon of Ceos [Boys'] Foot Race at Olympia 452 B. C. (search)
Ode 7 For Lachon of Ceos [Boys'] Foot Race at Olympia 452 B. C. Shining daughter of Time and Night, the fifty [months have brought] you, sixteenth day of the month at Olympia by the will of to judge the speed of swift feet and preeminence in strength of limbs among the Greeks. The one to whom you give the most distinguished honor of victory is called glorious and much envied among men. You have adorned with garlands [the son] of Aristomenes, Lachon hon of Ceos [Boys'] Foot Race at Olympia 452 B. C. Shining daughter of Time and Night, the fifty [months have brought] you, sixteenth day of the month at Olympia by the will of to judge the speed of swift feet and preeminence in strength of limbs among the Greeks. The one to whom you give the most distinguished honor of victory is called glorious and much envied among men. You have adorned with garlands [the son] of Aristomenes, Lachon The rest is fragmentary.
Demosthenes, On the Crown, section 319 (search)
Philammon did not leave Olympia without a crown, because he was not so strong as Glaucus of Carystus, or other bygone champions: he was crowned and proclaimed victor, because he fought better than the men who entered the ring against him. You must compare me with the orators of today; with yourself, for instance, or anyone you like: I exclude none.
Demosthenes, Against Theocrines, section 66 (search)
Remember, therefore, men of the jury, the wickedness of these men, and remember also our ancestors, of whom Epichares, my grandfather, was victor in the foot-race for boys at Olympia and won a crown for the city, and enjoyed good report among your ancestors as long as he lived; whereas we, thanks to this god-detested fellow, have been deprived of our citizenship in that state
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XII, Chapter 9 (search)
perior foe, and the Council and people were at a loss what to do. At first the sentiments of the masses, from fear of the war, leaned toward handing over the suppliants, but after this, when Pythagoras the philosopher advised that they grant safety to the suppliants, they changed their opinions and accepted the war on behalf of the safety of the suppliants. When the Sybarites advanced against them with three hundred thousand men, the Crotoniates opposed them with one hundred thousand under the command of Milo the athlete, who by reason of his great physical strength was the first to put to flight his adversaries. For we are told that this man, who had won the prize in Olympia six times and whose courage was of the measure of his physical body, came to battle wearing his Olympic crowns and equipped with the gear of Heracles, lion's skin and club; and he won the admiration of his fellow citizens as responsible for their victory.
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XIII, Chapter 74 (search)
astles here and at Bisanthe against some such contingency as this. in Thrace, since, apart from the anger of the multitude, he was afraid of the law-suits which had been brought against him. For there were many who, on seeing how he was hated, had filed numerous complaints against him, the most important of which was the one about the horses, involving the sum of eight talents. Diomedes, it appears, one of his friends, had sent in his care a four-horse team to Olympia; and Alcibiades, when entering it in the usual way, listed the horses as his own; and when he was the victor in the four-horse race, Alcibiades took for himself the glory of the victory and did not return the horses to the man who had entrusted them to his care.Cp. Isocrates, On the Team of Horses. As he thought about all these things he was afraid lest the Athenians, seizing a suitable occasion, would inflict punishment upon him for all the wrongs he had commi
Euripides, Hippolytus (ed. David Kovacs), line 535 (search)
Chorus 'Tis folly, folly, that the land of Greece makes great the slaughter of cattle by the banks of the Alpheus and in the Pythian house of ApolloOlympia and Delphi, holy places of Zeus and Apollo. if we pay no honor to Eros, mankind's despot, who holds the keys to the sweet chambers of Aphrodite! He ruins mortals and sets them upon all manner of disaster when he visits them.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 1, chapter 59 (search)
Now of these two peoples, Croesus learned that the Attic was held in subjection and divided into factions by Pisistratus, son of Hippocrates, who at that time was sovereign over the Athenians. This Hippocrates was still a private man when a great marvel happened to him when he was at Olympia to see the games: when he had offered the sacrifice, the vessels, standing there full of meat and water, boiled without fire until they boiled over. Chilon the Lacedaemonian, who happened to be there and who saw this marvel, advised Hippocrates not to take to his house a wife who could bear children, but if he had one already, then to send her away, and if he had a son, to disown him. Hippocrates refused to follow the advice of Chilon; and afterward there was born to him this Pisistratus, who, when there was a feud between the Athenians of the coast under Megacles son of Alcmeon and the Athenians of the plain under Lycurgus son of Aristolaides, raised up a third faction, as he coveted the sover
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