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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 384 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 28 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 24 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 22 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 18 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 16 0 Browse Search
Bacchylides, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 14 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 8 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 8 0 Browse Search
Plato, Laws 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long). You can also browse the collection for Olympia (Greece) or search for Olympia (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 1 (search)
and understanding, and in a way of life conformable to nature. Take care then not to die without having been spectators of these things. But you take a journey to Olympia to see the work of Phidias,This work was the colossal chryselephantine statue of Zeus (Jupiter) by Phidias, which was at Olympia. This wonderful work is describedOlympia. This wonderful work is described by Pausanias (Eliaca, A, 11). and all of you think it a misfortune to die without having seen such things. But when there is no need to take a journey, and where a man is, there he has the works (of God) before him, will you not desire to see and understand them? Will you not perceive eitherCompare Persius, Sat. iii, 66— "Discite what this is for which you have received the faculty of sight? But you may say, there are some things disagreeable and troublesome in life. And are there none at Olympia? Are you not scorched? Are you not pressed by a crowd? Are you not without comfortable means of bathing? Are you not wet when it rains? Have you not abundance of
Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 3 (search)
atever he suffers, it is Zeus who is exercising him? Hercules when he was exercised by Eurystheus did not think that he was wretched, but without hesitation he attempted to execute all that he had in hand. And is he who is trained to the contest and exercised by Zeus going to call out and to be vexed, he who is worthy to bear the sceptre of Diogenes? Hear what Diogenes says to the passers by when he is in a fever, Miserable wretches, will you not stay? but are you going so long a journey to Olympia to see the destruction or the fight of athletes; and will you not choose to see the combat between a fever and a man?Upton quotes Hieronymus lib. ii. adversus Jovianum, where the thing is told in a different way. Would such a man accuse God who sent him down as if God were treating him unworthily, a man who gloried in his circumstances, and claimed to be an example to those who were passing by? For what shall he accuse him of? because he maintains a decency of behaviour, because he display