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Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
ythographer, as well as by Hom. Il. 2.742. Ovid calls her Hippodame. The scene of the battle of the Lapiths with the centaurs at the wedding of Pirithous was sculptured in the western gable of the temple of Zeus at Olympia; all the sculptures were discovered, in a more or less fragmentary state, by the Germans in their excavations of the sanctuary, and they are now exhibited in the museum at Olympia. See Paus. 5.10.8, with my commentaOlympia. See Paus. 5.10.8, with my commentary ( Frazer, Paus. vol. iii. pp. 516ff.). when he engaged in war against the centaurs. For when Pirithous wooed Hippodamia, he feasted the centaurs because they were her kinsmen. But being unaccustomed to wine, they made themselves drunk by swilling it greedily, and when the bride was brought in, they attempted to violate her. But Pirithous, fully armed, with Theseus, joined battle with them, and Theseus killed many of them.
Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
golden chariot with winged steeds. On the chest of Cypselus at Olympia the horses of Pelops in the chariot race were represented ke him. The sacrifice was offered at a particular altar at Olympia, which some people called the altar of Hephaestus, and othus. 5.14.6). In the eastern gable of the temple of Zeus at Olympia the competitors with their chariots and charioteers were re or less mutilated, by the Germans in their excavation of Olympia and are now exhibited in the local museum. See Paus. 5.10.is Theopompus. He related that when Pelops was on his way to Pisa (Olympia) to woo Hippodamia, his charioteer Cillus died in Lesbos, he legend of Oenomaus and Hippodamia belonged to Lesbos and not to Olympia. See his Bild und Lied, p. 187 note. and whether it was td to Argolis, but her bones were afterwards brought back to Olympia. See Thuc. 1.9; Paus. 6.20.7; Tzetzes, Chiliades i.415ff.; <
Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
ucian and Hyginus. The offers made by the three divine competitors to Paris are recorded with substantial agreement by Eur. Tro. 924ff., Isocrates, Lucian, and Apollodorus. Hyginus is also in harmony with them, if in his text we read fortissimum for the formissimum of the MSS., for which some editors wrongly read formosissimum. The scene of the judgment of Paris was represented on the throne of Apollo at Amyclae and on the chest of Cypselus at Olympia (Paus. 3.8.12; Paus. 5.19.5).; and sailed away to Sparta with ships built by Phereclus.Compare Hom. Il. 5.59ff., from which we learn that the shipbuilder was a son of Tecton, who was a son of Harmon. The names of his father and grandfather indicate, as Dr. Leaf observes, that the business had been carried on in the family for three generations. Compare Tzetzes, Scholiast on Lycophron 97. For nine days he was entertained by Mene
Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
between Memnon and Achilles was represented on the throne of Apollo at Amyclae, and on the chest of Cypselus at Olympia (Paus. 3.18.12; Paus. 5.19.1). It was also the subject of a group of statuary, which was set up beside the Hippodamium at Olympia (Paus. 5.22.2). Some fragments of the pedestal which supported the group have been discovered: one of them bears the name MEMNON inscribed in archaic letters. See Die Inschriften von Olympia 662; and Frazerux when they rescued their sister Helen. See above, Apollod. 3.7.4, Apollod. E.1.23. On the chest of Cypselus at Olympia the artist portrayed Helen setting her foot on Aethra's head and tugging at her handmaid's hair. See Paus. 5.19. had taken refuge, Ajax drew down the image itself. This incident was carved on the chest of Cypselus at Olympia (Paus. 5.19.5), and painted by Polygnotus in his great picture of the sack of Troy at Delphi (Paus.
Aristophanes, Wasps (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.), line 1342 (search)
bit? Hi! you woman! come here! Philocleon Oh! What do you want to do? Bdelycleon To take her away from you and lead her off. You are too much worn out and can do nothing. He takes the girl into the house. Philocleon Listen to me! One day, at Olympia, I saw Euphudion boxing bravely against Ascondas; he was already aged, and yet with a blow from his fist he knocked down his young opponent. So watch out that I don't blacken your eyes. Bdelycleon who has returned By Zeus! you have Olympia at n! come here! Philocleon Oh! What do you want to do? Bdelycleon To take her away from you and lead her off. You are too much worn out and can do nothing. He takes the girl into the house. Philocleon Listen to me! One day, at Olympia, I saw Euphudion boxing bravely against Ascondas; he was already aged, and yet with a blow from his fist he knocked down his young opponent. So watch out that I don't blacken your eyes. Bdelycleon who has returned By Zeus! you have Olympia at your finger-ends!
Aristotle, Eudemian Ethics, Book 3, section 1233b (search)
the fitting is the suitable, as nothing is fitting that is unsuitable. But it must be fitting in each particular, that is, in suitability to the agent and to the recipient and to the occasion—for example, what is fitting at the wedding of a servant is not what is fitting at that of a favorite; and it is fitting for the agent himself, if it is of an amount or quality suitable to him—for example people thought that the mission that Themistocles conducted to Olympia was not fitting for him, because of his former low station, but would have been for Cimon.The story of Themistocles at the Olympic festival incurring disapproval by vying with Cimon in the splendor of his equipment and entertainments is told by Plut. Them. 5. But he who is casual in regard to the question of suitability is not in any of these classes.Similarly in regard to liberality: a man may be neither liberal nor illiberal.Generally
Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (ed. H. Rackham), Book 7, chapter 4 (search)
scussion of ‘pleasures and desires’ ( 4.5); but in chap. 6 it is contrasted with desire, and its indulgence in the form of anger is seen to be painful rather than pleasant (6.4). —not merely ‘unrestrained’ ; because we regard them as distinct from the unrestrained in the strict sense, and only so called by analogy, like our familiar exampleThis seems to be the meaning of the imperfect tenses. An inscription records that a boxer named *)/anqrwpos won at Olympia in 456 B.C. and the Greek commentators say that he is referred to here. His name would appear to have been used in the Peripatetic school as an example of the analogical use of words. of Man the Olympic winner, whose special definition is not very differenti.e., it requires the addition of three words. Strictly speaking, however, it is impossible to define an individual; moreover, the Olympic victor (a) was a man not merely by analogy but as a mem
Aristotle, Politics, Book 2, section 1274a (search)
an able lawgiver, and that he was trained in Crete, being a Locrian and travelling there to practise the art of soothsaying, and Thales became his companion, and Lycurgus and Zaleucus were pupils of Thales, and Charondas of Zaleucus; but these stories give too little attention to the dates. Philolaus of Corinth also arose as lawgiver at Thebes. Philolaus belonged by birth to the Bacchiad family; he became the lover of Diocles the winnerIn 728 B.C. at Olympia, but when Diocles quitted the city because of his loathing for the passion of his mother Alcyone, he went away to Thebes, and there they both ended their life. Even now people still show their tombs, in full view of each other and one of them fully open to view in the direction of the Corinthian country but the other one not; for the story goes that they arranged to be buried in this manner, Diocles owing to his hatred for his misfortune securing that the land
Aristotle, Politics, Book 5, section 1313b (search)
ardApparently this means a citizen force side by side with the tyrant's mercenaries; a variant gives ‘in order that the (tyrant's) guard may be kept.’may not be kept, and also that the people being busy with their daily affairs may not have leisure to plot against their ruler. Instances of this are the pyramids in Egypt and the votive offerings of the Cypselids,Cypselus and his son Periander (1310b 29 n., 1284a 26 n.) dedicated a colossal statue of Zeus at Olympia and other monuments there and at Delphi. and the building of the temple of Olympian Zeus by the PisistratidaePisistratus is said to have begun the temple of Olympian Zeus at Athens, not finished till the time of Hadrian. and of the temples at Samos, works of PolycratesTyrant of Samos, d. 522 B.C. (for all these undertakings produce the same effect, constant occupation and poverty among the subject people); and the levying of taxes, as at
Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese), book 2, chapter 23 (search)
r territory, were in the habit of alleging that it was festival time, when there should be a holy truce. This obviously left the door open to fraud, so Agesipolis (one of the Spartan kings) consulted the oracle of Zeus at Olympia to ask whether he was to respect such a truce. The reply of the oracle was that he might decline a truce fraudulently demanded. To confirm this, Agesipolis put the same question to Apollo: “Is your opinion as to the truce the s answered Apollo. Agesipolis thereupon invaded Argos. The point is that really Apollo had little choice, since it would have been disgraceful for the son to contradict the father. after having first consulted the oracle at Olympia, asked the god at Delphi whether his opinion was the same as his father's, meaning that it would be disgraceful to contradict him. Helen was a virtuous woman, wrote Isocrates, because Theseus so judged; the same applies to Alexand<
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