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Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 10 0 Browse Search
Aristophanes, Wasps (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.) 2 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Eudemian Ethics 2 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 2 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden) 2 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 2 0 Browse Search
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Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
Admete, daughter of Eurystheus, desired to get it. So taking with him a band of volunteer comrades in a single ship he set sail and put in to the island of Paros, which was inhabited by the sons of Minos,According to Diod. 5.79.2, Rhadamanthys bestowed the island of Paros on his son Alcaeus. Combined with thParos on his son Alcaeus. Combined with the evidence of Apollodorus, the tradition points to a Cretan colony in Paros. to wit, Eurymedon, Chryses, Nephalion, and Philolaus. But it chanced that two of those in the ship landed and were killed by the sons of Minos. Indignant at this, Hercules killed the sons of Minos on the spot and besieged the rParos. to wit, Eurymedon, Chryses, Nephalion, and Philolaus. But it chanced that two of those in the ship landed and were killed by the sons of Minos. Indignant at this, Hercules killed the sons of Minos on the spot and besieged the rest closely, till they sent envoys to request that in the room of the murdered men he would take two, whom he pleased. So he raised the siege, and taking on board the sons of Androgeus, son of Minos, to wit, Alcaeus and Sthenelus, he came to Mysia, to the court of Lycus, son of Dascylus, and was entertai
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
. According to Hyginus, Fab. 41, Androgeus was killed in battle during the war which his father Minos waged with the Athenians. But when the tidings of his death were brought to Minos, as he was sacrificing to the Graces in Paros, he threw away the garland from his head and stopped the music of the flute, but nevertheless completed the sacrifice; hence down to this day they sacrifice to the Graces in Paros without flutes and garlands. But not long afParos without flutes and garlands. But not long afterwards, being master of the sea, he attacked Athens with a fleet and captured Megara, then ruled by king Nisus, son of Pandion, and he slew Megareus, son of Hippomenes, who had come from Onchestus to the help of Nisus.Compare Paus. 1.39.5, who calls Megareus a son of Poseidon, and says that Megara took its name from him. Now Nisus perished through his daughter's treachery. For he had a purple hair on the middle of his head, and an oracle ran t
Aristophanes, Wasps (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.), line 1170 (search)
is usually done. Philocleon Ah! I know something that is indeed most domestic. Once upon a time there was a rat and a cat ... Bdelycleon "Oh, you ignorant fool," as Theagenes said to the dung-gatherer in a rage. Are you going to talk of cats and rats among high-class people? Philocleon Then what should I talk about? Bdelycleon Tell some dignified story. Relate how you were sent on a solemn mission with Androcles and Clisthenes. Philocleon On a mission! never in my life, except once to Paros, a job which brought me in two obols a day. Bdelycleon At least say, that you have just seen Ephudion doing well in the pancratium with Ascondas and, that despite his age and his white hair, he is still robust in loin and arm and flank and that his chest is a very breastplate. Philocleon Stop! stop! what nonsense! Who ever contested at the pancratium with a breast-plate on? Bdelycleon That is how well-behaved folk like to talk. But another thing. When at wine, it would be fitting to rel
Aristotle, Eudemian Ethics, Book 2, section 1223a (search)
moreover there are three subdivisions of appetition—wish, passion and desire; so that we have to distinguish these. And first we must consider conformity with desire.It would seem that everything that conforms with desire is voluntary. For everything involuntary seems to be forced, and what is forced and everything that people do or suffer under necessity is painful, as indeed Evenus says: For all necessity doth cause distress— Evenus of Paros = Theog. 472 Quoted also Aristot. Met. 1015a 28 and Aristot. Rhet.1370a 10, and = Theognidea 472 (but that has XRH=M' A)NIARO/N); probably by the elder Evenus of Paros, fl. 460 B.C. (Bowra, Cl. Rev. 48.2). so that if a thing is painful it is forced and if a thing is forced it is painful; but everything contrary to desire is painful (for desire is for what is pleasant), so that it is forced and involuntary. Therefore what conforms with desire is volu
Aristotle, Politics, Book 1, section 1258b (search)
very probable variant gives ‘the quarrying of stone.’ and all sorts of mining; and of mining itself there are many classes, since there are many sorts of metals obtained out of the earth. TheIn the mss. this sentence follows the next one. most scientific of these industries are those which involve the smallest element of chance, the most mechanic those in which the operatives undergo the greatest amount of bodily degradation, the most servile those in which the most uses are made of the body, and the most ignoble those in which there is the least requirement of virtue as an accessory. But while we have even now given a general description of these various branches, yet a detailed and particular account of them, though useful for the practice of the industries, would be illiberal as a subject of prolonged study. There are books on these subjects by certain authors, for example CharetidesOtherwise unknown. of Paros
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden), Book 3, line 121 (search)
Ere this, a flying rumor had been spread That fierce Idomeneus from Crete was fled, Expell'd and exil'd; that the coast was free From foreign or domestic enemy. We leave the Delian ports, and put to sea; By Naxos, fam'd for vintage, make our way; Then green Donysa pass; and sail in sight Of Paros' isle, with marble quarries white. We pass the scatter'd isles of Cyclades, That, scarce distinguish'd, seem to stud the seas. The shouts of sailors double near the shores; They stretch their canvas, and they ply their oars. ‘All hands aloft! for Crete! for Crete!’ they cry, And swiftly thro' the foamy billows fly. Full on the promis'd land at length we bore, With joy descending on the Cretan shore. With eager haste a rising town I frame, Which from the Trojan Pergamus I name: The name itself was grateful; I exhort To found their houses, and erect a fo
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams), Book 3, line 121 (search)
The tale was told us that Idomeneus, from his hereditary kindgom driven, had left his Crete abandoned, that no foe now harbored there, but all its dwellings lay untenanted of man. So forth we sailed out of the port of Delos, and sped far along the main. The maenad-haunted hills of Naxos came in view; the ridges green of fair Donysa, with Olearos, and Paros, gleaming white, and Cyclades scattered among the waves, as close we ran where thick-strewn islands vex the channelled seas with rival shout the sailors cheerly called: “On, comrades! On, to Crete and to our sires!” Freely behind us blew the friendly winds, and gave smooth passage to that fabled shore, the land of the Curetes, friends of Jove. There eagerly I labored at the walls of our long-prayed-for city; and its name was Pergamea; to my Trojan band, pleased with such name, I gave command to build altar and hearth, and raise the lofty tow