hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 70 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 12 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 4 0 Browse Search
Aeschines, Speeches 2 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 2 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 2 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 2 0 Browse Search
Dinarchus, Speeches 2 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 2 0 Browse Search
Bacchylides, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Pausanias, Description of Greece. You can also browse the collection for Pellene or search for Pellene in all documents.

Your search returned 35 results in 17 document sections:

1 2
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Corinth, chapter 7 (search)
Asopus, there is on the right the Olympium, and a little farther on, to the left of the road, the grave of Eupolis,Flourished at the time of the Peloponnesian war. the Athenian comic poet. Farther on, if you turn in the direction of the city, you see the tomb of Xenodice, who died in childbirth. It has not been made after the native fashion, but so as to harmonize best with the painting, which is very well worth seeing. Farther on from here is the grave of the Sicyonians who were killed at Pellene, at Dyme of the Achaeans, in Megalopolis and at Sellasia.222 B.C. Their story I will relate more fully presently. By the gate they have a spring in a cave, the water of which does not rise out of the earth, but flows down from the roof of the cave. For this reason it is called the Dripping Spring. On the modern citadel is a sanctuary of Fortune of the Height, and after it one of the Dioscuri. Their images and that of Fortune are of wood. On the stage of the theater built under the citadel
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Corinth, chapter 8 (search)
joined by the Epidaurians and Troezenians inhabiting Argolian Acte, and by the Megarians among those beyond the Isthmus, while Ptolemy made an alliance with the Achaeans. The Lacedaemonians and king Agis, the son of Eudamidas, surprised and took Pellene by a sudden onslaught, but when Aratus and his army arrived they were defeated in an engagement, evacuated Pellene, and returned home under a truce. After his success in the Peloponnesus, Aratus thought it a shame to allow the Macedonians to holPellene, and returned home under a truce. After his success in the Peloponnesus, Aratus thought it a shame to allow the Macedonians to hold unchallenged Peiraeus, Munychia, Salamis, and Sunium; but not expecting to be able to take them by force he bribed Diogenes, the commander of the garrisons, to give up the positions for a hundred and fifty talents, himself helping the Athenians by contributing a sixth part of the sum. He induced Aristomachus also, the tyrant of Argos, to restore to the Argives their democracy and to join the Achaean League; he captured Mantinea from the Lacedaemonians who held it. But no man finds all his pla
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Corinth, chapter 12 (search)
iest sacrifices to the winds one night in every year. He also performs other secret rites at four pits, taming the fierceness of the blasts, and he is said to chant as well charms of Medea. On reaching Sicyon from Titane, as you go down to the shore you see on the left of the road a temple of Hera having now neither image nor roof. They say that its founder was Proetus, the son of Abas. When you have gone down to the harbor called the Sicyonians' and turned towards Aristonautae, the Port of Pellene, you see a little above the road on the left hand a sanctuary of Poseidon. Farther along the highway is a river called the Helisson, and after it the Sythas, both emptying themselves into the sea. Phliasia borders on Sicyonia. The city is just about forty stades distant from Titane, and there is a straight road to it from Sicyon. That the Phliasians are in no way related to the Arcadians is shown by the passage in Homer that deals with the list of the Arcadians, in which the Sicyonians are
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Elis 2, chapter 8 (search)
Socrates of Pellene won the boys' race, and Amertes of Elis the wrestlers' match for boys at Olympia, besides beating all competitors in the men's wrestling match at Pytho. It is not said who made the statue of Socrates, but that of Amertes is from the band of Phradmon of Argos. Euanoridas of Elis won the boys' wrestling-match both at Olympia and at Nemea. When he was made an umpire he joined the ranks of those who have recorded at Olympia the names of the victors. As to the boxer, by name Damator in the boys' boxing match. The statue of Euthymenes for his victory over the boys was made by Alypus; the statue of Damocritus was made by Cleon, and that of Philip the Azanian by Myron. The story of Promachus, son of Dryon, a pancratiast of Pellene, will be included in my account of the Achaeans.See Paus. 7.27.5. Not far from Promachus is set up the statue of Timasitheus, a Delphian by birth, the work of Ageladas of Argos. This athlete won in the pancratium two victories at Olympia and thr
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Elis 2, chapter 13 (search)
d round the post, and, when she heard the trumpet, quickened her pace, reached the umpires first, realized that she had won and stopped running. The Eleans proclaimed Pheidolas the winner and allowed him to dedicate a statue of this mare. The sons also of Pheidolas were winners in the horse-race, and the horse is represented on a slab with this inscription :—The swift Lycus by one victory at the Isthmus and two hereCrowned the house of the sons of Pheidolas.But the inscription is at variance with the Elean records of Olympic victors. These records give a victory to the sons of Pheidolas at the sixty-eighth Festival but at no other. You may take my statements as accurate. There are statues to Agathinus, son of Thrasybulus, and to Telemachus, both men of Elis. Telemachus won the race for four-horse chariots; the statue of Agathinus was dedicated by the Achaeans of Pellene. The Athenian people dedicated a statue of Aristophon, the son of Lysinus, who won the men's pancratium at Olympia
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Achaia, chapter 6 (search)
When the Ionians were gone the Achaeans divided their land among themselves and settled in their cities. These were twelve in number, at least such as were known to all the Greek world; Dyme, the nearest to Elis, after it Olenus, Pharae, Triteia, Rhypes, Aegium, Ceryneia, Bura, Helice also and Aegae, Aegeira and Pellene, the last city on the side of Sicyonia. In them, which had previously been inhabited by Ionians, settled the Achaeans and their princes. Those who held the greatest power among the Achaeans were the sons of Tisamenus, Daimenes, Sparton, Tellis and Leontomenes; his eldest son, Cometes, had already crossed with a fleet to Asia. These then at the time held sway among the Achaeans along with Damasias, the son of Penthilus, the son of Orestes, who on his father's side was cousin to the sons of Tisamenus. Equally powerful with the chiefs already mentioned were two Achaeans from Lacedaemon, Preugenes and his son, whose name was Patreus. The Achaeans allowed them to found a ci
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Achaia, chapter 7 (search)
When the Greeks no longer took concerted action, but each state acted for itself alone, the Achaeans enjoyed their greatest power. For except Pellene no Achaean city had at any time suffered from tyranny, while the disasters of war and of pestilence touched Achaia less than any other part of Greece. So we have what was called the Achaean League, and the Achaeans had a concerted policy and carried out concerted actions. As a place of assembly they resolved to have Aegium, for, after Helice had binterval. Some too who lived outside the Isthmus were persuaded to join the Achaean League by its unbroken growth in power. Alone among the Greeks the Lacedaemonians were the bitter enemies of the Achaeans and openly carried on war against them. Pellene, a city of the Achaeans, was captured by Agis, the son of Eudamidas, who was king at Sparta; but he was immediately driven out by the Sicyonians under Aratus. Cleomenes, the son of Leonidas, the son of Cleonymus, king of the other royal house, w
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Achaia, chapter 17 (search)
hat he had done to Attis, and persuaded Zeus to grant that the body of Attis should neither rot at all nor decay. These are the most popular forms of the legend of Attis. In the territory of Dyme is also the grave of Oebotas the runner. Although this Oebotas was the first Achaean to win an Olympic victory, he yet received from them no special prize. Wherefore Oebotas pronounced a curse that no Achaean in future should win an Olympic victory. There must have been some god who was careful that the curse of Oebotas should be fulfilled, but the Achaeans by sending to Delphi at last learned why it was that they had been failing to win the Olympic crown. So they dedicated the statue of Oebotas at Olympia and honored him in other ways, and then Sostratus of Pellene won the footrace for boys. It is still to-day a custom for the Achaeans who are going to compete at Olympia to sacrifice to Oebotas as to a hero, and, if they are successful, to place a wreath on the statue of Oebotas at Olympia.
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Achaia, chapter 26 (search)
the road the sanctuary of the Huntress, where they say the goat crouched. The territory of Aegeira is bounded by that of Pellene, which is the last city of Achaia in the direction of Sicyon and the Argolid. The city got its name, according to the acink it was from Pellen, an Argive. And they say that he was the son of Phorbas, the son of Triopas. Between Aegeira and Pellene once stood a town, subject to the Sicyonians and called Donussa, which was laid waste by the Sicyonians;it is mentioned,one place and some in another, then either he or one of his colleagues perverted the name through ignorance. The port of Pellene is Aristonautae. Its distance from Aegeira on the sea is one hundred and twenty stades, and to Pellene from this port isone hundred and twenty stades, and to Pellene from this port is half that distance. They say that the name of AristonautaeThe Greek word means “best sailors.” was given to that port because it was one of the habors into which the Argonauts enter
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Achaia, chapter 27 (search)
The city of Pellene is on a hill which rises to a sharp peak at its summit. This part then is precienian acropolis and at Plataea. The people of Pellene also say that a shrine of Athena sinks deep ie throughout the whole city. There is also at Pellene a sanctuary of Apollo, the Strangers' God, an the register of youths. Here stands a man of Pellene called Promachus, the son of Dryon, who won ptoo that when a war arose between Corinth and Pellene, Promachus killed a vast number of the enemy.as.Unknown. Be this as it may, the people of Pellene hold Promachus in the highest honor. But Chaee is because he overthrew the constitution of Pellene, and received from Alexander, the son of Phil be set up as tyrant of one's own fatherland. Pellene has also a sanctuary of Eileithyia, which is to Poseidon. About sixty stades distant from Pellene is the Mysaeum, a sanctuary of the Mysian Demus. Rivers come down from the mountains above Pellene, the one on the side nearest Aegeira being ca[2 more...]
1 2