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Pausanias, Description of Greece 60 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 22 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 8 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 6 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 4 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 4 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris (ed. Robert Potter) 4 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 2 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 2 0 Browse Search
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Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
n a custom practised by vine-dressers on passing strangers. See W. Mannhardt, Mythologische Forschungen, pp. 12, 53ff., who, for the rough jests of vine dressers in antiquity, refers to Hor. Sat. i.8.28ff.; Pliny, Nat. Hist. xviii.26.66(249). And having put in to the island of Doliche, he saw the body of Icarus washed ashore and buried it, and he called the island Icaria instead of Doliche. In return Daedalus made a portrait statue of Hercules at Pisa, which Hercules mistook at night for living and threw a stone and hit it. And during the time of his servitude with Omphale it is said that the voyage to ColchisThat is, the voyage of the Argo. See above, Apollod. 1.9.16ff. As to the hunt of the Calydonian boar, see above, Apollod. 1.8.2ff. As to the clearance of the Isthmus by Theseus, see below, Apollod. 3.16, and the Apollod. E.1.1ff. and the hunt of the Calydonian boar took place, and t
Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
. On the chest of Cypselus at Olympia the horses of Pelops in the chariot race were represented with wings (Paus. 5.17.7). Now Oenomaus, the king of Pisa, had a daughter Hippodamia,The following account of the wooing and winning of Hippodamia by Pelops is the fullest that has come down to us. Compareomaus with Lesbos is to a certain extent countenanced by a story for which the authority cited is Theopompus. He related that when Pelops was on his way to Pisa (Olympia) to woo Hippodamia, his charioteer Cillus died in Lesbos, and that his ghost appeared to Pelops in a dream, lamenting his sad fate and beg had reached the Ocean and been cleansed by Hephaestus,Compare Tzetzes, Scholiast on Lycophron 156; Scholiast on Eur. Or. 990. he returned to Pisa in Elis and succeeded to the kingdom of Oenomaus, but not till he had subjugated what was formerly called Apia and Pelasgiotis, which he called Peloponnesu
Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
zes, Posthomerica 571-579; Tzetzes, Chiliades vi.508-515; Serv. Verg. A. 2.166; Dictys Cretensis ii.18. The mode of his capture and the substance of his prophecies were variously related. The need of fetching the bones of Pelops is mentioned by Tzetzes among the predictions of Helenus; and the necessity of obtaining the Palladium is recorded by Conon and Servius. According to Paus. 5.13.4, it was a shoulder-blade of Pelops that was brought from Pisa to Troy; on the return from Troy the bone was lost in a shipwreck, but afterwards recovered by a fisherman. to wit, first, if the bones of Pelops were brought to them; next, if Neoptolemus fought for them; and third, if the Palladium,As to the Palladium, see above, Apollod. 3.12.3. which had fallen from heaven, were stolen from Troy, for while it was within the walls the city could not be taken. On hearing these things the Greeks caused the bones of
Bacchylides, Epinicians (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Ode 5 For Hieron of Syracuse Single-horse victory at Olympia 476 B. C. (search)
t in battle, answered: “I left behind at home Deianeira,Deianeira did marry Heracles; later she killed him unintentionally by giving him a robe treated with poison, which she thought was a love-charm.with her neck like a fresh olive; golden Cypris, charmer of mortals, is still unknown to her.” White-armed Calliope, stop your well-made chariot right there. Sing of the Olympian ruler of the gods, Zeus son of Cronus, and the untiring stream of the Alpheus, and the strength of Pelops, and Pisa, where glorious Pherenicus won victory in the race with his feet, and returned to Syracuse with its fine towers, bringing to Hieron the leaf of good fortune. For the sake of truth we must give praise, pushing away envy with both hands, if any mortal man does well. A Boeotian man, Hesiod, attendant of the sweet Muses, said this: “He whom the gods honor has a good name among men as well.” I am easily persuaded to send to Hieron my illustrious voice, not from the path .There is anothe
Euripides, Helen (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 386 (search)
Helen and the chorus go into the palace. After the doors have closed upon them, Menelaos enters. He is alone and clad in rags. Menelaos O Pelops, who once held that chariot-race contest with Oinomaos over Pisa, if only, when you were persuaded to make a banquet for the gods, you had left your life then, inside the gods, before you ever begot my father, Atreus, to whom were born, from his marriage with Airope, Agamemnon and myself, Menelaos, a famous pair; for I believe that I carried a mighty army—and I say this not in boast—in ships to Troy, no tyrant commanding any troops by force, but leading the young men of Hellas by voluntary consent. And some of these can be counted no longer alive, others as having a joyful escape from the sea, bringing home again names thought to be of the dead. But I wander miserably over the swelling waves of the gray ocean, ever since I sacked the towers of Ilion; and although I long to come home, I am not thought worthy by the gods to achieve this. I
Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris (ed. Robert Potter), line 1 (search)
Before the great temple of Artemis of the Taurians. A blood-stained altar is prominently in view. Iphigenia, clad as a priestess, enters from the temple. Iphigenia Pelops, son of Tantalus, coming to Pisa with swift horses, married Oenomaus' daughter, and she gave birth to Atreus, whose children are Menelaus and Agamemnon; from him I was born, his child Iphigenia, by the daughter of Tyndareus. Where Euripus rolls about its whirlpools in the frequent winds and twists the darkening waves, my father sacrificed me to Artemis for Helen's sake, or so he thought, in the famous clefts of Aulis. For there lord Agamemnon mustered his expedition of a thousand ships of Hellas, wanting to take the crown of Troy in glorious victory and avenge the outrage to Helen's marriage, doing this favor for Menelaus. But when he met with dreadful winds that would not let him sail, he went to burnt sacrifices, and Calchas had this to say: “"Lord and general of Hellas, Agamemnon, you will not set free your sh
Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris (ed. Robert Potter), line 798 (search)
ell, it is for you to speak, for me to learn. Orestes I will say first what I have heard from Electra. Do you know of the strife that was between Atreus and Thyestes? Iphigenia I have heard of it; the quarrel concerned a golden ram. Orestes Did you not weave these things in a fine-textured web? Iphigenia O dearest, you are bending your course near to my heart! Orestes And the image of the sun in the middle of the loom? Iphigenia I wove that shape also, in fine threads. Orestes And you received a ceremonial bath from your mother, for Aulis? Iphigenia I know; for no happy marriage has taken that memory from me. Orestes What about this? You gave locks of your hair to be brought to your mother? Iphigenia As a memorial, in place of my body, in the tomb. Orestes What I myself have seen, I will say for proof: an old spear of Pelops, in my father's house, which he brandished in his hand when he won Hippodamia, the maiden of Pisa, and killed Oenomaus; it was hung up in your rooms.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 2, chapter 7 (search)
ngth. Inland from the sea as far as Heliopolis, Egypt is a wide land, all flat and watery and marshy. From the sea up to Heliopolis is a journey about as long as the way from the altar of the twelve gods at Athens to the temple of Olympian Zeus at Pisa. If a reckoning is made, only a little difference of length, not more than two miles, will be found between these two journeys; for the journey from Athens to Pisa is two miles short of two hundred, which is the number of miles between the sea androm the sea as far as Heliopolis, Egypt is a wide land, all flat and watery and marshy. From the sea up to Heliopolis is a journey about as long as the way from the altar of the twelve gods at Athens to the temple of Olympian Zeus at Pisa. If a reckoning is made, only a little difference of length, not more than two miles, will be found between these two journeys; for the journey from Athens to Pisa is two miles short of two hundred, which is the number of miles between the sea and Heliopolis.
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Elis 1, chapter 1 (search)
a daughter Hyrmina, but no male issue. In the reign of Epeius the following events also occurred. Oenomaus was the son of Alxion (though poets proclaimed his father to be Ares, and the common report agrees with them), but while lord of the land of Pisa he was put down by Pelops the Lydian, who crossed over from Asia. On the death of Oenomaus, Pelops took possession of the land of Pisa and its bordering country Olympia, separating it from the land of Epeius. The Eleans said that Pelops was the fiPisa and its bordering country Olympia, separating it from the land of Epeius. The Eleans said that Pelops was the first to found a temple of' Hermes in Peloponnesus and to sacrifice to the god, his purpose being to avert the wrath of the god for the death of Myrtilus. Aetolus, who came to the throne after Epeius, was made to flee from Peloponnesus, because the children of Apis tried and convicted him of unintentional homicide. For Apis, the son of Jason, from Pallantium in Arcadia, was run over and killed by the chariot of Aetolus at the games held in honor of Azan. Aetolus, son of Endymion, gave to the dwell
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Elis 1, chapter 3 (search)
took Elis and sacked it, with an army he had raised of Argives, Thebans and Arcadians. The Eleans were aided by the men of Pisa and of Pylus in Elis. The men of Pylus were punished by Heracles, but his expedition against Pisa was stopped by an oraclePisa was stopped by an oracle from Delphi to this effectMy father cares for Pisa, but to me in the hollows of Pytho.Hermann's emendation would mean: “but unto me be assigned Pytho.”This oracle proved the salvation of Pisa. To Phyleus Heracles gave up the land of Elis and all thePisa, but to me in the hollows of Pytho.Hermann's emendation would mean: “but unto me be assigned Pytho.”This oracle proved the salvation of Pisa. To Phyleus Heracles gave up the land of Elis and all the rest, more out of respect for Phyleus than because he wanted to do so: he allowed him to keep the prisoners, and Augeas to escape punishment. The women of Elis, it is said, seeing that their land had been deprived of its vigorous manhood, prayed to Pisa. To Phyleus Heracles gave up the land of Elis and all the rest, more out of respect for Phyleus than because he wanted to do so: he allowed him to keep the prisoners, and Augeas to escape punishment. The women of Elis, it is said, seeing that their land had been deprived of its vigorous manhood, prayed to Athena that they might conceive at their first union with their husbands. Their prayer was answered, and they set up a sanctuary of Athena surnamed Mother. Both wives and husbands were so delighted at their union that they named the place itself, wh
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