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Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
lanippus. See Hdt. 5.67. It is probable that Clisthenes, in “fetching Melanippus,” transferred the hero's bones to the new shrine at Sicyon, following a common practice of the ancient Greeks, who were as anxious to secure the miraculous relics of heroes as modern Catholics are to secure the equally miraculous relics of saints. The most famous case of such a translation of holy bones was that of Orestes, whose remains were removed from Tegea to Sparta (Hdt. 1.67ff.). Pausanias mentions many instances of the practice. See the Index to my translation of Pausanias, s.v. “Bones,” vol. vi. p. 31. It was, no doubt, unusual to bury bones in the Prytaneum, where was the Common Hearth of the city (Pollux ix.40; Corpus Inscriptionum Atticarum, ii.467, lines 6, 73; Frazer, note on Paus. viii.53.9, vol. iv. pp. 441ff.); but at Mantinea there was a round building called the Common He
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
Scholiast on Hom. Il. ii.581. According to the Scholiasts on Euripides and Homer, Icarius joined Hippocoon in driving his brother Tyndareus out of Sparta. They fled to Thestius and allied themselves with him in the war which he waged with his neighbors; and Tyndareus married Leda, daughter of Thestiusd to have laid an egg, which in the time of Pausanias was still to be seen hanging by ribbons from the roof of the temple of Hilaira and Phoebe at Sparta. See Paus. 3.16.1. According to one account (First Vatican Mythographer 78), Castor, Pollux, and Helen all emerged from a single egg; according to against Aphidnae, took the city, got possession of Helen, and led Aethra, the mother of Theseus, away captive. Now the kings of Greece repaired to Sparta to win the hand of Helen. The wooers were these:For another list of the suitors of Helen, see Hyginus, Fab. 81. Hesiod in his Catalogues gave a lis
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
amsels, as we learn from Apollodorus, were Phoebe and Hilaira. Compare Stephanus Byzantius, s.v. *)/afidna; Prop. i.2.15ff.; Hyginus, Fab. 80. At Sparta they had a sanctuary, in which young maidens officiated as priestesses and were called Leucippides after the goddesses. See Paus. 3.16.1. From an obscure s in the shape of two golden stars, which shortly before the fatal battle of Leuctra fell down and disappeared, as if to announce that the star of Sparta's fortune was about to set for ever. See Cicero, De divinatione i.34.75, ii.32.68. The same interpretation of the twins would accord well with therpretation of the twins would accord well with their white horses (see the preceding note), on which the starry brethren might be thought to ride through the blue sky. And when the Dioscuri were translated to the gods, Tyndareus sent for Menelaus to Sparta and handed over the kingdom to him.
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
tion was king of Thebe in Cilicia. and Alexander married Oenone, daughter of the river Cebren.For the loves of Paris and Oenone, and their tragic end, compare Conon 23; Parthenius, Narrat. 4; Ovid, Her. v. She had learned from Rhea the art of prophecy, and warned Alexander not to sail to fetch Helen; but failing to persuade him, she told him to come to her if he were wounded, for she alone could heal him. When he had carried off Helen from Sparta and Troy was besieged, he was shot by Philoctetes with the bow of Hercules, and went back to Oenone on Ida. But she, nursing her grievance, refused to heal him. So Alexander was carried to Troy and died. But Oenone repented her, and brought the healing drugs; and finding him dead she hanged herself. The Asopus river was a son of Ocean and Tethys, or, as Acusilaus says, of Pero and Poseidon, or, according to some, of Zeus and Eurynome. Him Metop
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
5, p. 39, ed. Potter, who gives a list of legendary or mythical personages who were said to have been buried in sanctuaries or temples. Amongst the instances which he cites are the graves of Cinyras and his descendants in the sanctuary of Aphrodite at Paphus, and the grave of Acrisius in the temple of Athena on the acropolis of Larissa. To these examples C. G. Heyne, commenting on the present passage of Apollodorus, adds the tomb of Castor in a sanctuary at Sparta (Paus. 3.13.1), the tomb of Hyacinth under the image of Apollo at Amyclae (Paus. 3.19.3), and the grave of Arcas in a temple of Hera at Mantinea (Paus. 8.9.3). “Arguing from these examples,” says Heyne, “some have tried to prove that the worship of the gods sprang from the honours paid to buried mortals.” PandionCompare Paus. 1.5.3, who distinguishes two kings named Pandion, first, the son of Erichtonius, and, second,
Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
nt of the ancient writer confirms our confidence in the excellence of the sources used by Apollodorus and in the fidelity with which he followed them. In his complete work he may have narrated the impiety of Caeneus in setting up his spear for worship, though the episode has been omitted in the Epitome. Having made a compact with Pirithous that they would marry daughters of Zeus, Theseus, with the help of Pirithous, carried off Helen from Sparta for himself, when she was twelve years old,See above, Apollod. 3.10.7, with the note. Diod. 4.63.2 says that Helen was ten years old when she was carried off by Theseus and Pirithous. and in the endeavor to win Persephone as a bride for Pirithous he went down to Hades. And the Dioscuri, with the Lacedaemonians and Arcadians, captured Athens and carried away Helen, and with her Aethra, daughter of Pittheus, into captivity;Compare Diod. 4.63.3, 5; Plut. The
Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
and his murder by Agamemnon, see Eur. IA 1148ff.; Paus. 2.18.2, Paus. 2.22.2ff. According to Pausanias, he was a son of Thyestes or of Broteas, and his bones were deposited in a large bronze vessel at Argos. And there were born to Agamemnon a son Orestes, and daughters, Chrysothemis, Electra, and Iphigenia.In Hom. Il. 9.142ff. Agamemnon says that he has a son Orestes and three daughters, Chrysothemis, Laodice, and Iphianassa (Iphigenia), and he offers to give any one of his daughters in marriage to Achilles without a dowry, if only that doughty hero will forgive him and fight again for the Greeks against Troy. Electra, the daughter of Agamemnon, who figures so prominently in Greek tragedy, is unknown to Homer, and so is the sacrifice of Agamemnon's third daughter, Iphigenia. And Menelaus married Helen and reigned over Sparta, Tyndareus having ceded the kingdom to him.See above, Apollod. 3.11.2.
Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
myclae and on the chest of Cypselus at Olympia (Paus. 3.8.12; Paus. 5.19.5).; and sailed away to Sparta with ships built by Phereclus.Compare Hom. Il. 5.59ff., from which we learn that the shipbuilder was roperty on board, she set sail with him by night.With this account of the hospitable reception of Paris in Sparta, the departure of Menelaus for Crete, and the flight of the guilty pair, compare Proclus, Chrestom. i., in Epicoraccording to Hdt. 2.117, the author of the Cypria described how Paris and Helen sailed in three days from Sparta to Ilium with a fair wind and a smooth sea. It seems therefore that Herodotus and Proclus had different tm the Greeks and Trojans fought and died, was a mere wraith, while her true self was far away, whether at home in Sparta or with Proteus in Egypt; for there is nothing to show whether Stesichorus shared the opinion that Paris
Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
to Neoptolemus at Troy, and celebrated the marriage after his return to Sparta (Hom. Od. 4.1-9). Sophocles wrote a tragedy Hermione , the plcient idol of the Tauric Artemis. The wooden image of Artemis Orthia at Sparta, at whose altar the Spartan youths were scourged to the effusion of bloaemonians to be the true original image brought by Iphigenia herself to Sparta; and their claim was preferred by Pausanias to that of the Athenians (P Hermione a son Tisamenus, who succeeded his father on the throne of Sparta. But Pausanias also mentions a tradition that Orestes had a bastard sonn Arcadia; from there his bones were stolen by a Spartan and carried to Sparta in compliance with an oracle, which assured the Spartans of victory ovee found Orestes, who had avenged his father's murder. And having come to Sparta he regained his own kingdom,The return of Menelaus to his home was relat<
Aristophanes, Birds (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.), line 801 (search)
taerus First give our city a great and famous name, then sacrifice to the gods. Euelpides I think so too. Leader of the Chorus Let's see. What shall our city be called? Pisthetaerus Will you have a high-sounding Laconian name? Shall we call it Sparta? Euelpides What! call my town Sparta? Why, I would not use esparto for my bed, even though I had nothing but bands of rushes. Pisthetaerus Well then, what name can you suggest? Euelpides Some name borrowed from the clouds, from these lofty reSparta? Why, I would not use esparto for my bed, even though I had nothing but bands of rushes. Pisthetaerus Well then, what name can you suggest? Euelpides Some name borrowed from the clouds, from these lofty regions in which we dwell —in short, some well-known name. Pisthetaerus Do you like Nephelococcygia? Leader of the Chorus Oh! capital! truly that's a brilliant thought! Euelpides Is it in Nephelococcygia that all the wealth of Theogenes and most of Aeschines' is? Pisthetaerus No, it's rather the plain of Phlegra, where the gods withered the pride of the sons of the Earth with their shafts. Leader of the Chorus Oh! what a splendid city! But what god shall be its patron? for whom shall we weave
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