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Pausanias, Description of Greece 36 0 Browse Search
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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 12 0 Browse Search
Bacchylides, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 8 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Alcestis (ed. David Kovacs) 4 0 Browse Search
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John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 2 0 Browse Search
Plato, Hippias Major, Hippias Minor, Ion, Menexenus, Cleitophon, Timaeus, Critias, Minos, Epinomis 2 0 Browse Search
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Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
poets call her Stheneboea.See below, Apollod. 2.3.1, Apollod. 3.9.1. Euripides called her Stheneboea (Eustathius on Hom. Il. vi.158, p 632). His in-law restored him to his own land with an army of Lycians, and he occupied Tiryns, which the Cyclopes had fortified for him.Compare Bacch. 10.77ff., ed. Jebb; Paus. 2.25.8; Strab. 8.6.8. They divided the whole of the Argive territory between them and settled in it, Acrisius reigning over Argos and Proetus over TTiryns. And Acrisius had a daughter Danae by Eurydice, daughter of Lacedaemon, and Proetus had daughters, Lysippe, Iphinoe, and Iphianassa, by Stheneboea. When these damsels were grown up, they went mad,Compare Bacch. 10.40-112, ed. Jebb; Hdt. 9.34; Strab. 8.3.19; Diod. 4.68; Paus. 2.7.8; Paus. 2.18.4; Paus. 5.5.10; Paus. 8.18.7ff.; Scholiast on Pind. N. 9.13 (30); Clement of Alexandria, Strom. vii.4.26, p. 844, ed. Potter; Stephanus Byzantiu
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
turn to Argos to claim the inheritance of him who had died by his hand, he went to Megapenthes, son of Proetus, at Tiryns and effected an exchange with him, surrendering Argos into his hands.As to this exchange of kingdoms, compare Paus. 2.16.3. So Megapenthes reigned over the Argives, and Perseus reigned over Tiryns, after fortifying also Midea and Mycenae.As to the fortification or foundation of Mycenae by Perseus, see Paus. 2.15.4, Paus. 2.16.3. Antext to banish Amphitryon from the whole of Argos, while he himself seized the throne of Mycenae and Tiryns; and he entrusted Midea to Atreus and Thyestes, the sons of Pelops, whom he had sent for. 0 Amphitryon went Sextus Empiricus, pp. 398ff., ed. Bekker; Scholiast on Pind. O. 6.68(115). And she told him to dwell in Tiryns, serving Eurystheus for twelve years and to perform the ten labours imposed on him, and so, she said, when the tas
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
When Hercules heard that, he went to Tiryns and did as he was bid by Eurystheus. First, Eurystheus ordered him to bring the skin of the Nemean lion;As to the Nemean lion, compare Hes. Th. 326ff.; Bacch. 8.6ff., ed. Jebb; Soph. Trach. 1091ff.; Theocritus xxv.162ff.; Diod. 4.11.3ff.; Eratosthenes, Cat. 12; Tzetzes, Chiliades ii.232ff.; Hyginus, Fab. 30. According to Hesiod, the Nemean lion was begotten by Orthus, the hound of Geryon, upon the monster Echidna. Hyginus says that the lion was bred by the Moon. now that was an invulnerable beast begotten by Typhon. On his way to attack the lion he came to Cleonae and lodged at the house of a day-laborer, Molorchus;As to Herakles and Molorchus, compare Tibullus iv.1.12ff.; Verg. G. 3.19, with Servius's note; Martial iv.64.30, ix.43.13; Statius, Sylv. iii.1.28. and when his host would have offered a victim in sacrifice, Hercules told him to wa
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
illed the children he had by Megara. See Apollod. 2.4.12. Not long after, some cattle were stolen from Euboea by Autolycus, and Eurytus supposed that it was done by Hercules; but Iphitus did not believe it and went to Hercules. And meeting him, as he came from Pherae after saving the dead Alcestis for Admetus, he invited him to seek the kine with him. Hercules promised to do so and entertained him; but going mad again he threw him from the walls of Tiryns.The story is told somewhat differently by Hom. Od. 21.23-30. According to him, Iphitus had lost twelve mares (not oxen) and came in search of them to Herakles, who murdered him in his house and kept the mares. A Scholiast on Hom. Od. xxi.22 says that the mares had been stolen by Autolycus and sold by him to Herakles. Another Scholiast on the same passage of Homer, who refers to Pherecydes as his authority, says that Herakles treacherously lured Iphitus
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
aeus), Apollod. 2.7.7 (Cycnus). Compare Apollod. E.2.5 (Oenomaus); note on Apollod. 1.7.8 (Evenus). After Eurystheus had perished, the Heraclids came to attack Peloponnese and they captured all the cities.For the first attempted invasion of the Peloponnese by the Heraclids or sons of Herakles, see Diod. 4.58.1-4. The invasion is commonly spoken of as a return, because, though their father Herakles had been born at Thebes in Boeotia, he regarded Mycenae and Tiryns, the kingdom of his forefathers, as his true home. The word (ka/qodos) here employed by Apollodorus is regularly applied by Greek writers to the return of exiles from banishment, and in particular to the return of the Heraclids. See, for example, Strab. 8.3.30, Strab. 8.4.1, Strab. 8.5.5, Strab. 8.6.10, Strab. 8.7.1, Strab. 8.8.5, Strab. 9.1.7, Strab. 10.2.6, Strab. 13.1.3, Strab. 14.2.6; Paus. 4.3.3; Paus. 5.6.3. The correspondi
Bacchylides, Epinicians (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Ode 11 For Alexidamus of Metapontion Boys' Wrestling at Delphi Date unknown (search)
ed thought into their minds, and they fled to the wooded mountain with terrible screams, leaving behind the city of Tiryns and its god-built streets. For it was now the tenth year since the heroes with their bronze shields, fearless in battle, had left Argos, the city loved by the gods, and lived in Tiryns with their much envied king, because an insurmountable quarrel had arisen, from a slight beginning, between the brothers Proetus and Acrisius. They were destroying their people with lae sons of Abas that, since they had as their share a land rich in barley, the younger one should be the founder of Tiryns, before they fell under ruinous compulsion. And Zeus son of Cronus, honoring the race of Danaus and of horse-driving Lynthe glorious city, where the godlike far-famed heroes lived when they had left behind horse-pasturing Argos. It was from Tiryns that the dark-haired unsubdued daughters of Proetus rushed in their flight. And woe overcame Proetus' heart, and an
Euripides, Alcestis (ed. David Kovacs), line 477 (search)
s of this land of Pherae, do I find Admetus at home? Chorus-Leader Yes, Pheres' son is at home, Heracles. But tell us what need brings you to Thessaly and to this city of Pherae. Heracles I am performing a certain labor for Eurystheus, king of Tiryns. Chorus-Leader Where are you bound? What is the wandering you are constrained to make? Heracles I go in quest of the four-horse chariot of Thracian Diomedes. Chorus-Leader How can you do that? Do you not know what kind of host he is? Heracleshen you will either kill him and return or end your days there. Heracles This is not the first such race I shall have run. Chorus-Leader If you defeat their master, what will it profit you? Heracles I will bring the horses back to the lord of Tiryns. Chorus-Leader You will not find it easy to put a bit in their mouths. Heracles Surely so, unless they breathe fire from their nostrils. Chorus-Leader No, but they tear men apart with their nimble jaws. Heracles This is fodder for mountain b
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 6, chapter 76 (search)
As Cleomenes was seeking divination at Delphi, the oracle responded that he would take Argos. When he came with Spartans to the river Erasinus, which is said to flow from the StymphalianThe Stymphalian lake, near the base of Cyllene, discharges itself into a cavern at the foot of a cliff; the river which reappears near Argos (the Erasinus) has been generally identified with this stream. lake (this lake issues into a cleft out of sight and reappears at Argos, and from that place onwards the stream is called by the Argives Erasinus)—when Cleomenes came to this river he offered sacrifices to it. The omens were in no way favorable for his crossing, so he said that he honored the Erasinus for not betraying its countrymen, but even so the Argives would not go unscathed. Then he withdrew and led his army seaward to Thyrea, where he sacrificed a bull to the sea and carried his men on shipboard to the region of Tiryns and to Naupli
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 6, chapter 77 (search)
The Argives heard of this and came to the coast to do battle with him. When they had come near Tiryns and were at the place called Hesipeia, they encamped opposite the Lacedaemonians, leaving only a little space between the armies. There the Argives had no fear of fair fighting, but rather of being captured by a trick. This was the affair referred to by that oracle which the Pythian priestess gave to the Argives and Milesians in common, which ran thus: When the female defeats the maleThis would be fulfilled by a victory of the female *spa/rth over the male *)argos. And drives him away, winning glory in Argos, She will make many Argive women tear their cheeks. As someday one of men to come will say: The dread thrice-coiled serpent died tamed by the spear. All these things coming together spread fear among the Argives. Therefore they resolved to defend themselves by making use of the enemies' herald, and they performed their resolve in this way: whenever the Spartan herald signalled an
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 6, chapter 83 (search)
But Argos was so wholly deprived of men that their slaves took possession of all affairs, ruling and governing until the sons of the slain men grew up. Then they recovered Argos for themselves and cast out the slaves; when they were driven out, the slaves took possession of Tiryns by force. For a while they were at peace with each other; but then there came to the slaves a prophet, Cleander, a man of Phigalea in Arcadia by birth; he persuaded the slaves to attack their masters. From that time there was a long-lasting war between them, until with difficulty the Argives got the upper hand.About 468, apparently.
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