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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 332 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 1 256 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden) 210 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 188 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 178 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 164 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 112 0 Browse Search
Euripides, The Trojan Women (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 84 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 82 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 80 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs). You can also browse the collection for Troy (Turkey) or search for Troy (Turkey) in all documents.

Your search returned 40 results in 22 document sections:

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Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs), line 56 (search)
Enter a female servant from the house. Servant Mistress, I do not shrink from calling you this name since it was the name I thought proper in your house when we lived in the land of Troy. I was well disposed toward you there and to your husband while he lived, and now I have come to you with bad news, in fear that one of the masters might hear of it but out of pity for you: Menelaus is planning dreadful acts against you with his daughter. Against them you must take precaution. Andromache Dearest fellow-slave (for you are fellow-slave to your former mistress, who is now unfortunate), what are they doing? What kind of plans are they weaving now, in their desire to kill me, woman most wretched? Servant They are about to kill your son, unhappy woman, whom you sent secretly out of the house. Menelaus has left the house to fetch him. Andromache Oh me! Has he discovered the son I sent into hiding? How could he have done so? Alas, I am undone! Servant I do not know. But I had this wor
Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs), line 103 (search)
Andromache sung It was not as a bride that Paris brought Helen to lofty Troy into his chamber to lie with but rather as mad ruin. For her sake, the sharp warcraft of Greece in its thousand ships captured you, O Troy, sacked you with fire and sword, and killed Hector, husband to luckless me. The son of the sea-goddess Thetis draTroy, sacked you with fire and sword, and killed Hector, husband to luckless me. The son of the sea-goddess Thetis dragged him, as he rode his chariot, about the walls of Troy. I myself was led off from my chamber to the sea-shore, putting hateful slavery as a covering about my head. Many were the tears that rolled down my cheeks when I left my city and my home and my husband lying in the dust. Oh, unhappy me, why should I still look on the lighTroy. I myself was led off from my chamber to the sea-shore, putting hateful slavery as a covering about my head. Many were the tears that rolled down my cheeks when I left my city and my home and my husband lying in the dust. Oh, unhappy me, why should I still look on the light as Hermione's slave? Oppressed by her I have come as suppliant to this statue of the goddess and cast my arms about it, and I melt in tears like some gushing spring high up on a cliff.
Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs), line 126 (search)
Chorus Know your fate, consider the present ill-fortune into which you have come. Do you wrangle with your masters when you are a woman of Troy and they were born in Sparta? The sea goddess's shrine, receiver of sacrifices—leave it behind. What profit is for you to mar your body with weeping in bewilderment because of the hard constraints of your masters? The mastering hand will come upon you: why do you toil in vain, powerless as you ar
Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs), line 141 (search)
Chorus In my eyes you were much to be pitied when you came, woman of Troy, to the house of my lords. But I hold my peace from fear (though I have pity on your lot) lest the child of Zeus's daughter learn that I wish you w
Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs), line 183 (search)
feriors arguments that defeat them. Nonetheless I shall not be guilty of betraying myself. Tell me, young woman, what was the reliable argument that persuaded me to deprive you of your lawful due as a wife? [Is it that Sparta is a lesser city than Troy and is surpassed in fortune by it, and that you see me a free woman?] Was it in order that I might bear children instead of you, slaves and a miserable appendage to myself? Or is it that, emboldened by youth and a body in the bloom of its prime, hildren as the royal family of Phthia if you do not bear any? Naturally, since the Greeks love me both for Hector's sake . And am I myself obscure and not rather one of Troy's royal family? No, it is not because of any drugs of mine that your husband dislikes you but the fact that you are not fit to live with. For this too is a means of procuring love. It is not beauty but good qualities that give joy to husbands. Bu
Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs), line 284 (search)
Chorus When the goddesses came to the shady glen, in the streams of mountain springs they bathed their radiant bodies, and then vying with each other in extravagant words of malicious intent they came to the son of Priam. Aphrodite was victorious by her wheedling words, delightful to hear but entailing bitter destruction for the luckless city of the Phrygians, the citadel of Troy.
Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs), line 301 (search)
Chorus Slavery's yoke would not have come upon the women of Troy and you, woman, would have come to possess the throne of royalty. She could have loosed Hellas from the grievous toils of ten years' exile the young men with their spears suffered about Troy. And marriage-beds would not now be left desolate and old men bereft of their children. Chorus Slavery's yoke would not have come upon the women of Troy and you, woman, would have come to possess the throne of royalty. She could have loosed Hellas from the grievous toils of ten years' exile the young men with their spears suffered about Troy. And marriage-beds would not now be left desolate and old men bereft of their children.
Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs), line 309 (search)
akes them seem intelligent.] Did you, who are such a petty creature, once serve as general over Greece's troops and wrest Troy away from Priam? At the word of your daughter, a mere child, you come in great pride and enter into competition with a poor slave woman. I regard you no longer as worthy of Troy or Troy as worthy of you. [It is from without that those with the reputation for wisdom are splendid, while from within they are no more than the rest of humanity except in wealth: yet wealth hTroy as worthy of you. [It is from without that those with the reputation for wisdom are splendid, while from within they are no more than the rest of humanity except in wealth: yet wealth has great power. Melenaus, come now, let us converse. Suppose I have died at your daughter's hand and she has destroyed me. From that point on she will not escape the pollution of murder. But in the eyes of the majority you also will be on trial for u. But if I escape death, will you kill my son? And then how will his father cheerfully put up with his son being killed? Troy does not call him such a coward. But he will go where he must and he will make it clear that he is doing deeds worthy of P
Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs), line 352 (search)
riage, and in his eyes I incur no less a penalty than in yours if I afflict his line with childlessness. That is the way I am. As for your nature, there is one thing I fear: it was in the matter of a female quarrel that you also destroyed unhappy Troy. Chorus Leader You have spoken too much as a women to a man, and has hurled forth sober judgment from your mind. Menelaus Woman, these things are, as you say, trifles and not worthy of my kingly power or of Greece. But make no mistake, whatever an individual happens to desire, that becomes for him greater than the conquest of Troy. I have become the fixed ally of my daughter, for I think it is a serious matter to be deprived of sex. Any other misfortunes a woman may suffer are secondary, but if she loses her husband she loses her life. Neoptolemus must rule over my slaves, and my kin—and I myself as well—must rule over his. For friends have no private property but hold all things in common. And i
Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs), line 384 (search)
rs have I set fire to? I went to bed against my will with my master: will you then kill me rather than him, the man who is to blame? Will you let go the cause and attack the effect that came after? Alas for my misery! O my unhappy fatherland, what injustice I suffer! Why must I even have given birth and doubled the burden I bear? [But why do I lament these things but do not consider to their last drop the misfortunes immediately before me?] I saw Hector dragged to death behind a chariot and Troy put piteously to the torch, and I myself went, pulled by the hair, as a slave to the Argive ships. And when I came to Phthia, I was made the bride of Hector's slayer. How can life be sweet for me? To what shall I look? To my past or my present fate? I had left a single son, the eye of my life: those who have decided these things mean to kill him. But no, not to save my wretched life! If he survives he bears our hopes, while for me not to die on behalf of my child is a reproach. She leaves t
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